media

taberandrew, creative commons

If you take a look at movies or TV, you’d think that having a disability is the worst fate possible-- maybe even worse than death.  Better to not be born at all than struggle through life unable to walk, hear, see or talk.

Chion Wolf

Two years after the uprisings of the “Arab Spring” - and the overthrow of Egyptian strongman Hosni Mubarak, that country is in political turmoil. The state - and it’s president - Mohammed Morsi was even the target of the Daily Show’s Jon Stewart.

Here are some of the magazine's I've written for: Mirabella, Men’s Health, Mademoiselle, Best Life, Verge ...

Simon Q (Flickr Creative Commons)

New York Times reporter John Broder got the kind of assignment that’s pretty sweet in these days of high-profile “tech” reporting - a road trip in a Tesla “model S” electric car.

His article - drawn from his experience of running out of battery power in the cold temperatures here in Connecticut - suggested that Tesla’s vision of the great American road trip “needs some work.”

Tesla CEO Elon Musk snapped back - calling the article a “fake.”

Flickr Creative Commons, daveyrockwell

Watching the coverage of Newtown unfold on Friday, I grew upset by the number of wrong reports.

Flickr Creative Commons, danxoneil

What didn't get covered as a full-blown campaign issue in 2012?

TINY ART

Oct 19, 2012

Poster stamps, also known as “cinderellas,” are posters shrunk to the size of stamps. Though they are gummed on the back for affixing to letters, they are non-denominated, meaning they cannot be used to mail anything.  In the early 1900s, they were used to advertise businesses and events or to make political statements. Before poster stamps, stamps were created only for postage or revenue. In the late 1800s, stamps created for exhibitions and fairs were among the first to be non-denominated and became the pre-cursors to poster stamps.

Trust Al Gore to come up with an out-of-left-field and yet completely plausible explanation for something people have been discussing for two days.

Chion Wolf

Latinos make up one-sixth of the nation's population, but accounted for more than half of the country's population growth from 2000 to 2010, according to the latest census.

That includes a growth of nearly 50 percent in Connecticut - where Hispanics make up 13 percent of the population.

With this growth comes a new push from the media to cater to the population - and not always just in Spanish. Major news networks are creating English language programming for Latinos.

Jonathan McNicol photo

It’s the fiftieth anniversary of CPTV! Connecticut Public Broadcasting President and CEO Jerry Franklin joins us. David Shipley and Will Schwalbe's Send—the classic guide to email for office and home—has become indispensable for readers navigating the impersonal, and at times overwhelming, world of electronic communication.  Filled with real-life email success (and horror) stories and a wealth of useful and entertaining examples, Send dissects all the major minefields and pitfalls of email. Schwalbe is our guest.

Real Life Survival Guide Episode 61

Oct 1, 2012
Cindy Papish Gerber

We've been focusing our conversations on the specifics of some of our categories lately, and in the area of relationships, there are many difficulties associated with the process of coupling - and uncoupling - in 21st century life, it seemed ike a natural topic for the Guide.

Impressionist Art in the Information Age

Sep 20, 2012

Hartford, CT -  What does the CPBN Media Lab and The New Britain Museum of American Art  have in common?  The answer; Weir Farm.  

Lunch With the Lab

Aug 9, 2012

On May 7, Kayley, our first summer intern, began her experience in the media lab. She was later joined by Anthony, Lucy, Kirsten, Tyler, Emily, and me. We did a total of 17 shoots over our three months here. In addition to having three of the four senatorial candidates come to our studio for the (I)NTERVIEW series, we went out for two Outdoor Enthusiast shoots, at Wadsworth Falls and Candlewood Lake. With all of our adventures across the state, I wanted to know what my fellow interns are taking away from their experiences.

Flickr Creative Commons, Michael Melchoirre

What a strange day. I've just been reading the final tweets of a very young journalist named Jessica Ghawi also known as Jessica Redfield.

Chion Wolf

After years of speculation, rumors, and whispers, we finally heard this week what we had long expected. The only problem is I can't tell whether I'm talking about the Higgs boson or Anderson Cooper.

mrceder (Flickr Creative Commons)

You can read about government, listen to stories on the radio and watch them on TV...but do you really know how government works?

When a mayor makes a campaign promise...when a candidate takes a campaign donation from a company...when a complex budget is explained in a one-page press release...we’re left wondering, “What’s the real story?”

Real Life Survival Guide Episode 46

May 13, 2012
Cindy Papish Gerber

I don't want to say that serving adult beverages makes for better conversation, but in Episode 46, recorded at Nini's House of Tapas, the conversation flowed - and so did the vino!

Joining the party; guest cohost Gerry McGuire (sitting in for Duo, who's back next week), Barbie Douglas, Katie Gerhard, Mary Elliot and Jon Crane.

Real Life Survival Guide Episode 45

May 6, 2012
Cindy Papish Gerber

I've known News 8 anchor Ann Nyberg for years now, and always describe her as "the whole package" - kind, generous... and drop dead gorgeous! Needless to say, when Ann offered to host Episode 45 of the Real Life Survival Guide, we couldn't say "YES" fast enough!

Joining Ann and her boutique-mate (and great friend) Francine Piscitelli were Venetucci Home visionary Tony Venetucci, and returning guest editor Eileen Kaplan.

Ann Nyberg is WTNH-TV's longest serving Anchor~Reporter in station history. Ann anchors the 6 and 10 o'clock nightly newscasts.

Whisk(e)y!

Apr 9, 2012
Chion Wolf

Flickr Creative Commons, cmcbrown

"All media work us over completely."  So said Marshall McLuhan.

It was clear to McLuhan in the early 1960s and it's even clearer to us that engagement with fast-moving electronic media is producing changes that are hard to keep track of.

What if somebody wanted to produce certain changes in us that we weren't aware of?  What if someone wanted to persuade us without having to have a conversation with our conscious intellects?

Chion Wolf

The sudden news that the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation has apologized and essentially reversed itself on the issue of defunding Planed Parenthood is yet another example of the incredible power of the internet. 

Flickr Creative Commons, BenLucier

It's hard to keep an even keel about the debate over the two Internet anti-piracy laws known as SOPA and PIPA.

Yesterday's spectacle, if it revealed nothing else, showed what a flimsy connection there is between a congressmen "co-sponsoring" a bill and that same congressmen knowing what's in the bill.

After yesterday's show of force,  a number of congressmen withdrew their support for their co-sponsorship because ... wait for it ... they didn't agree with the content of the bills.

A spokesman for the New Haven Public Schools is leaving his post following an incident in which he grabbed a reporter’s camera while she was on assignment and insisted that she stop filming. More and more school districts are employing public relations professionals. We take a look at the field, at a time when people want more information about what’s going on in their local schools.

Flickr Creative Commons, DonkeyHotey

The national political media spend about a month trying to convince you that Iowa's caucuses are important. Now they're going to spend a week telling you why they don't matter.

On his blog PressThink, media critic Jay Rosen argued this week that: "The Iowa Caucuses are presented as a news event, a mini-election with an informational outcome, a winner. But what they really are is a ritual, the gathering of a professional tribe, which affirms itself and its place in our political system by staging this thing every four years."

David Baker (Flickr Creative Commons)

If you’ve listened to this show for a while, you know I’m from Pittsburgh. And that makes me a Steelers fan. Steelers fans root for their team in good seasons and bad, and have always had a belief that their players embody the spirit of Art Rooney, one of the founders of the modern NFL. Their players are tough and gritty, without being thuggish. They play hard…and they play right.

Then, you see this.

That’s from last Thursday night.

Holiday Advertising

Dec 14, 2011
Lucky Strike

It's the holiday season! Christmas, Hanukah, Christmakuh, Kwanza, or as advertisers like to think of it, the season when they separate you from your money.

#OccupyWallSt

Oct 4, 2011
carwil, creative commons

It started three weeks ago with a small group of protesters, a vague list of objectives, and a central message: Occupy Wall Street.

The movement has picked up steam - adding thousands of protesters, with a still evolving list of concerns.  Aimed at corporate America and the wealthiest 1% of the nation’s taxpayers, another central theme of the protest is: “We are the 99%.”

For the better part of a week, the biggest story in the media was the perceived lack of coverage of the protests... by the media.

US Navy photo by (SCW) F. Julian Carroll

A briefing with a three star Army General was the first order of business Tuesday at the journalists conference at Ft Leavenworth. Lieutenant General William B Caldwell was all set to appear before us via video teleconference from Afghanistan but technology got in the way. The link up didn't work properly so he spoke with reporters using the old fashioned telephone conference.

Lucy Nalpathanchil

It's Military 101 on the first official day of the journalists conference at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Inside Lewis and Clark Hall, men and some women stream through wearing the Army combat uniforms: tan, grey and green camouflage that blends well in the desert. Occasionally, you see officers from other countries like Brazil, Botswana, and Singapore, who are also here to study at the Command and General Staff College.

Photo by Lucy Nalpathanchil

Bridging the gap between the media and the military: that's the goal of a week-long conference hosted by the University of Kansas School of Journalism and Fort Leavenworth Combined Arms Center. Seventeen journalists including myself were accepted into the program because of our interest and backgrounds covering military issues.

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