The White House

Today, a special edition of the show: A post mortem on the bin Laden post mortem, a look at the minds and mindsets behind the story.

We start with a discussion on the mass psychology behind reactions to bin Laden's death—your reactions, our reactions… everyone's reactions.

Then we'll talk to the first chief of the CIA's bin Laden task force about the mind of the man—Osama bin Laden, himself.

And finally, NPR's media correspondent David Folkenflik joins us to discuss the media's mindset during and following a story like this one.

Elvert Barnes, Creative Commons

For years, we’ve been hearing about the chronic struggles of newspapers and the proliferation of so called “new media” sources of journalism.  

As one outcome of this change, the traditional competition for stories between papers has given way to a new era of cooperation. By pooling resources and working together, these upstarts are making a real impact, informing the community, and driving the discussion in collaboration with newspapers.  

Today we continue our series of conversations recorded at a conference called “Lifting the Veil: Journalism Uncovered.”

GiantsFanatic / Creative Commons

Connecticut towns and cities are mandated by law to publish public notices in local newspapers.  But that could soon change.

NPR's David Folkenflik once got into a battle of words with Geraldo Rivera.  It just proves that covering the media isn't always pretty. 

His latest assignment is a perfect example: Cover the corporate meltdown of your own company...go! 

Flickr Creative Commons, Don Hankins

Here, to me, are the killer statistics:

Todd Huffman

NPR is under attack over funding, fundraising and claims of bias.  So what does the network’s Ombudsman think?

We have Alicia Shepard, NPR’s Ombudsman on Where We Live regularly to talk about journalism, and the job that NPR reporters and editors do. 

She’s leaving the network, just as NPR has become a national issue on Fox News and the butt of jokes on The Daily Show. 

Flickr Creative Commons, mrgilles

So you think you had a bad week? National Public Radio can top you

Flickr Creative Commons, ky_olsen

You could argue that one of the big breaks in the history of knowledge is happening right now, as we move from being storers of knowledge to being adept searchers for what is stored.

There's a basic shift in the notion of what education is. Most of us moved through an education pipeline in which existed some vague notion that you were better off loading a lot of stuff into your head. It would help you think. It would give you points of reference. You should know a lot of things.