WNPR

media

Updated at 10:24 p.m. ET

The White House communications operation underwent a dramatic shake-up Friday. Sean Spicer resigned as press secretary after President Trump appointed Anthony Scaramucci, a wealthy New York financier, as his communications director. Appearing on camera before the White House press corps at a televised press briefing, Scaramucci then announced Sarah Sanders, Spicer's deputy, as the new press secretary.

In statements Friday night, Trump praised Scaramucci and Sanders.

Investors sent shares of the Internet streaming service Netflix soaring after the company reported that it had beaten forecasts and attracted 5.2 million new subscribers worldwide, increasing its membership to 104 million.

"We also crossed the symbolic milestones of 100 million members and more international than domestic members. It was a good quarter," Netflix wrote in its second-quarter letter to shareholders.

Early in the new ESPN documentary Mike And The Mad Dog, Robert Thompson — a designated Talking Head Expert On Pop Culture for decades — says that if you don't live in New York, there's a good chance you don't really know who Mike Francesa and Chris Russo are. But, the documentary argues persuasively, you've seen the results of their work.

JT / Flickr

Americans like to argue, a lot. In politics, in media, and in society at large, arguing has (arguably) become the default means by which we handle disagreement. But is it the most effective way, and has our readiness to wage a war with words gotten out of hand?

President Trump plans to nominate Republican Brendan Carr, the general counsel of the Federal Communications Commission, to fill one of the agency's two empty leadership seats.

Carr is a former legal adviser to current FCC Chairman Ajit Pai and was a lawyer with Wiley Rein LLP, which has worked with telecommunications companies including AT&T and Verizon.

The White House announced the president's plan late Wednesday.

Creative Commons

President Obama has been criticized in recent days for his response to Russian intervention in the 2016 election as reported in this big Washington Post article from Friday. The former president and his defenders say he acted in the best interests of the nation in trying to maintain faith in the electoral process and protect state voting rolls. Others think he could have done more. We talk about it. 

scyther5/iStock / Thinkstock

A special election in Georgia has been called the "most expensive, highest profile, most hyped special election" for a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. So with the Republican win, does it really tell us anything about the state of the electorate during the Trump administration? 

Sean P. Anderson flickr.com/photos/seanpanderson / Creative Commons

Gun control advocates and families of the Sandy Hook tragedy are asking NBC to pull an interview with “Infowars” radio host Alex Jones. The conspiracy theorist has said on numerous occasions that Sandy Hook was a hoax.

Jon S / Creative Commons

Several iconic Connecticut newspapers, including The New Haven Register, The Middletown Press, and The Register Citizen, have a new owner. New York-based Hearst Media has announced it has cut a deal to acquire the Connecticut assets of Digital First Media. 

Gabriel Kronisch / Creative Commons

My dream donut is smothered in vanilla frosting, rolled in toasted coconut and filled with lemon cream...mmm donuts.  

Donuts have been part of peoples lives for more than a thousand years -  in ceremony, in houses of worship, even police precincts.  Donuts mean different things to different people but bring different people together as one. Some credit donuts for helping American troops win WWI. We'll tell you that story. But first, tell us yours. 

Updated at 2:20 pm ET

President Trump is mounting a vigorous defense of his controversial travel ban, continuing an argument he started over the weekend in response to a terrorist attack in London.

That message launched a series of tweets.

His uncompromising language could complicate matters for administration lawyers charged with defending the travel ban in court.

Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, children of all ages!

I always wanted to use that in a commentary, that wonderful circus introduction ballyhooed by the splendid ringmaster, but I could just never find the ideal spot.

Of course, had I, there would've been some people who'd say that a circus doesn't belong in with sports. But, hey, just because there's clowns around doesn't disqualify certain daredevils from being certified athletes ­­-- equestrians, tightrope walkers and those who fly through the air with the greatest of ease.

Updated at 4:11 p.m. ET

Through nearly four decades, at least five presidential administrations and seemingly countless Super Bowls and World Series, NPR listeners could depend on at least one thing in the ever-unpredictable world of athletics: Frank Deford. A mainstay on Morning Edition, the Hall of Fame sportswriter was public radio's scholar of sports for some 37 years before hanging up his cleats earlier this year.

Jhonatas Jesus Silva / Flickr

Of the many strange behaviors we humans have engaged in, few seem more abhorrent than cannibalism. But the act of feasting on another human's flesh cannot be so easily dismissed as simply disgusting or deviant. Freud, in fact,  believed cannibalism played a role in the birth of religion itself.

Jon Kalish / New England News Collaborative

There's a thriving scene on YouTube where woodworkers, metalworkers and other "makers" provide a step-by-step guide to their process.

In Waterford, Maine a maker named Gardner Waldeier -- who calls himself “Bus Huxley” -- has been entertaining viewers with equal portions of Yankee ingenuity and video wizardry.

Pages