math

Search for Flight 370
5:55 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

Can A 250-Year-Old Mathematical Theorem Find A Missing Plane?

This statistical map guided searchers to an Air France flight that disappeared into the Atlantic Ocean in 2009.
C. Keller/Metron

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 9:28 am

Searchers are feeling overwhelmed by the task of locating the wreckage of missing Malaysian Airlines Flight 370.

"We're not searching for a needle in a haystack — we're still trying to define where the haystack is," Australian Air Marshal Mark Binskin said Tuesday. The current search zone stretches across many thousands of square miles of the Indian Ocean off the coast of Australia.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
12:19 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

The Unfolding Evolution of Origami

Robert J. Lang's Yellow Jacket.
Credit Terri D'Arcangelo

How do you make a 100 meter telescope that folds down to 3 meters so you can tuck it inside a space vehicle? How do you make a heart stent that folds out inside the human body? In each case, researchers have turned to masters of origami, the thousand year-old art of paper folding.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Thu February 20, 2014

Gender Balance and the Culture of Women in Science

What is causing a shortage of female scientists?
Credit Defence Images / Creative Commons

In 1962, the Nobel Prize was awarded to three scientists, James Watson, Francis Crick, and Maurice Wilkins, for their work in discovering the fundamental structure of DNA: the double helix. Today, Watson, Crick, and Wilkins maintain international prestige for their findings. 

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Audible Math
9:11 am
Thu November 14, 2013

The Sound of Sorting

Credit panthema.net

Ever wonder what an algorithm sounds like when it's being sorted? Wonder no more. A demo program called "The Sound of Sorting" visualizes algorithms and provides interesting sound effects, too -- low notes for smaller values, and high notes for higher values.

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Math
9:20 am
Tue September 24, 2013

Ever Wondered What's Bigger Than Infinity?

In this version of "epic maths" we'll walk you through a five-part introduction to the concept infinity. Thankfully, we have some muppets and a lot of charts to help us along the way.
Credit Flickr Creative Commons, Rainbow Lyf

Spoiler! The answer's not infinity plus one. Heck, it's not even infinity times infinity. (Yes, I'm sad to say that ad with the guy in the suit sitting with the kids is lying to you.) 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:40 am
Thu September 19, 2013

A Crash Course On How Infinity Works

Credit Flickr Creative Commons, Rainbow Lyf

Infinity is weird. It's neither even nor odd. It's not a number. Really, it's just a concept we use to summarize that which we can't understand.

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Pre-School
11:36 am
Fri June 21, 2013

"Math Talk" With Young Children

Sujata Srinivasan

A new study finds that the way teachers interact with young children while they play, can have a powerful impact on toddlers’ mathematical abilities. WNPR visits a pre-school on the campus of Eastern Connecticut State University.

This toddler is rolling a dice on a board game, trying to figure out how many spaces to get to a pig. Along the way, his teacher is constantly engaging him in “math talk.” The child was one of about 65 four and five-year-olds in a study on the importance of math education during play.

Professor Sudha Swaminathan.

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News
11:00 pm
Sun June 16, 2013

Blue Collar Tech Jobs Highlighted in "Hidden STEM Economy"

Pratt & Whitney in East Hartford

A new report out from Brookings confirms what many in Connecticut might have suspected: science, technology, engineering and math skills are vital to more than just universities and pharma companies. In fact, the study estimates 20 percent of all jobs -- about 26 million around the nation -- are dependent on a high level of skill in one of the STEM disciplines. That's a huge increase over previous estimates.

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Where We Live
11:57 am
Tue April 9, 2013

Exploring X and the City

Alex (Wikimedia Commons)

We talk a lot about cities and urban planning on Where We Live - the way cities work, fit together, breathe and function.

But when it gets right down to it, I’m viewing the city structure from my “liberal arts” background - not using math to “crunch the numbers” about what makes a city.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:41 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

The Complete Idiot's Guide To Reading Political Polls

Flickr Creative Commons, blprnt_van

A poll conducted in 1997 showed Congresswoman Barbara Kennelly leading incumbent John Rowland by four points. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
4:32 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Can Game Theory Predict The Next President?

Flickr Creative Commons, Jorge Franganillo

For years I have been ignorantly fascinated by Game Theory. By that I mean I know there's this whole interesting study of strategy and decision making that would inform my understanding of a lot of things -- politics, business, psychology -- if I only knew more about it.  

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Where We Live
10:49 am
Mon August 6, 2012

Why Is Algebra Necessary?

stuartpilbrow (Flickr Creative Commons)

“Is algebra necessary?” It’s a question that crosses the minds of many students struggling in high school and college math classes.

Professor Andrew Hacker wonders the same thing. His opinion piece about the math we teach to students has started a big conversation about how schools prepare people for the real world.

He wonders whether this stumbling block forces kids out of school early...whether it really helps with the 21st century tools we need.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:40 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

Fringe Physicists

Caption & photo used with permission - Jim Carter

Somewhere in the United States today, an envelope will arrive at a university math or science department, and in it will be some person's paradigm-shattering idea -- a novel theory that drastically violates or disrupts settled science.

The world is full of outsider physicists and rouge mathematicians. And, of course, one or two of them are basically correct about something. Einstein worked in a patent office. Michael Faraday did not have a university degree.

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STEM
3:08 pm
Mon February 13, 2012

STEM Series: A Look At K-12 STEM Education

Chion Wolf

The U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that many of the nation’s fastest-growing and highest paid jobs require training in science, technology, engineering and math, also known as the STEM fields. But in Connecticut,  an estimated 1,000 manufacturing jobs remain unfilled because applicants lack the skills they need. 

Many middle and high school students seem to lose interest in studying STEM subjects. For our second report in a week-long series, we explore why.

16-year old Charlotte Harrison says she’s always liked math.  

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Scholarship Program
7:50 am
Tue February 7, 2012

UNH To Offer Scholarships To Magnet School Students

Diane Orson

Qualified students in a New Haven engineering and science magnet school will be able to attend the University of New Haven for half price or free, under a program announced on Monday. The goal is to encourage students to pursue serious study in the “STEM” areas of science, technology, engineering and math.

Speaking at Monday’s announcement, UNH President Steven Kaplan said America is lagging behind other developed nations in math and science.  

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:13 pm
Thu June 9, 2011

Quirk Theory & Cool Science Geeks

Flickr Creative Commons, Horia Varlan

If you're tired of hearing about how far our public schools lag behind other nations in math and science, get ready for something completely different.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:33 pm
Mon March 14, 2011

Pi - A Window On Infinity

Flickr Creative Commons, Mykl Roventine

It's Pi Day, and we have to ask, can numbers be sexy?

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