WNPR

Massachusetts

Williams College President Adam Falk is leaving at the end of the year. Falk is the 17th president in the private Williamstown college’s history. WAMC’s Berkshire Bureau Chief JD Allen asked Falk about what he will do come January.

The state of Massachusetts planned to require more internet retailers to collect sales tax starting July 1st. But the initiative has been pulled just days before it would take effect.

Under the Baker administration plan, internet retailers with sales of $500,000 and 100 transaction per year in Massachusetts would have to charge the tax.

But the state rescinded the plan after two lawsuits were filed. The Department of Revenue said it will reintroduce the tax through a new regulation this fall.

The building code commissioner for Springfield, Mass., has sent a warning letter to a church that plans to become a sanctuary for immigrants facing deportation.

In 2010, Sonia Vallabh watched her mom, Kamni Vallabh, die in a really horrible way.

First, her mom's memory started to go, then she lost the ability to reason. Sonia says it was like watching someone get unplugged from the world. By the end, it was as if she was stuck between being awake and asleep. She was confused and uncomfortable all the time.

"Even when awake, was she fully or was she really? And when asleep, was she really asleep?" says Sonia.

The credit rating for Massachusetts is now on par with most New England states. That's after a major credit rating agency downgraded the state's bonds.

The Environmental Protection Agency's Appeals Board hears arguments Thursday on the second phase of cleaning up the Housatonic River in Berkshire County.

Chion Wolf / WNPR (file photo)

Hello. Hello? Anybody home? Think, McFly, think!

Oh, wait. Not that Biff. This BIFF: The Berkshire International Film Festival.

He's not a real doctor. His friends and family called him Ted. Since his death in 1991, Theodor Seuss Geisel has become the best-selling author of children's books in the world.

Now the city of Springfield, Massachusetts, pays homage to its favorite native son with the first-of-its-kind Seuss Museum.

Lydia Brown / WNPR

"The Cat in the Hat comes back" to Springfield and he’s bringing a few of his friends. Yertle the Turtle, Horton, the Lorax -- all can be found at The Amazing World of Dr. Seuss, a museum honoring the life and legacy of children’s author Theodor Geisel. 

Under President Trump, officials with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) are casting a broader net when it comes to who they’re prioritizing for arrest. According to ICE data, the focus in New England appears to be on immigrants with no criminal record.

ICE arrests of non-criminal immigrants living in New England without authorization have more than tripled so far this year.

Thirty-eight-year-old Jose Flores and his longtime partner, Rosa Benitez, have been living in Massachusetts for almost seven years. The Honduran nationals both entered the United States by illegally crossing the Southern border.

Benitez, 40 and with tired eyes, says she and Flores had to leave Honduras because of the violence.

‘I Came Here To Fight For My Family’

Western New England University is looking into statements allegedly posted by a member of the women's lacrosse team calling on President Trump to "build that wall."

Friday was Cinco de Mayo, May 5th, a Mexican holiday celebrating the country's victory in a battle against the French in 1862. In the U.S., it's become a celebration of Mexican American culture.

A Massachusetts judge has thrown out the murder conviction of Aaron Hernandez because the former NFL star died in prison before his appeal could be heard. The ruling comes nearly three weeks after Hernandez killed himself.

apasciuto / Creative Commons

President Donald Trump this week ordered a review of the U.S. Antiquities Act. The move could impact the Atlantic Ocean's first-ever marine national monument, created last fall.

Massachusetts formally dropped more than 21,000 tainted drug convictions Thursday that were linked to a disgraced state chemist who in 2013 admitted to faking test results.

It's the largest single dismissal of convictions in U.S. history, according to the American Civil Liberties Union.

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