WNPR

Long Island Sound

Wikimedia Commons

An environmental advocacy group claims hundreds of thousands of gallons of sewage flowed into rivers and streams in the state over several years, and it's blaming the city of Danbury.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Plastic today is everywhere: in our bottles and cell phones, our grocery bags, and our trash. Some plastic garbage is so small, it's impossible to see with the naked eye: tiny microbeads, which have been banned from some products because of their environmental impact. WNPR met up with a group of scientists who are looking for them, in an effort to determine how many are in the water off Connecticut's coast.

The state of Connecticut is working on a plan to inventory all of Long Island Sound’s natural resources and the ways people use it. It’s called the Blue Plan, and they’re starting to take public comment on it.

JGNY / Creative Commons

Federal environmental officials have given the go ahead for a new site in Long Island Sound where sediment dredged from the bottom of nearby harbors can be dumped. The announcement was welcomed by Connecticut's marine industries.

Lori Mack / WNPR

Clean water advocate Christopher Swain stopped in New Haven during a 130-mile swim from Montauk to New York City.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Connecticut is prepared to go to court with the state of New York over the right to dump dredged materials in eastern Long Island Sound. 

Friends of Hammonasset

UPDATE: Dennis Schain, spokesman for the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, stated: "It is likely that we will reduce the times the center is open in the upcoming offseason.  It is much less likely that we would actually close the nature center  for the winter months."

ORIGINAL POST:

A nature center on Long Island Sound could be closing just a few months after opening a brand new building. 

HBarrison / Creative Commons

The northeast congressional delegation is rallying in support of a comprehensive management plan for the Atlantic Ocean -- the nation's first coordinated strategy for federal waters. 

rickpilot_2000, Wikimedia Commons

Two men have died and a woman and child had to be taken to a hospital after a party of four people set off from the beach at Hammonasset State Park Sunday evening.

Andrew Ciscel / Creative Commons

What if commuting between Connecticut and Long Island meant hopping into a car and driving through a tunnel deep below Long Island Sound? Sounds far-fetched, right?

Well, if you're New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, you might not think so. And if you're Amtrak, you might think it shouldn't be cars driving under the Sound, but trains connecting the Northeast Corridor

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Tons of sand traveled from Cape Cod to the shoreline of a beach in West Haven. It’s part of a project to build a spot for recreational beach-goers and protect millions of dollars of buried coastal infrastructure. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

For Nutmeggers who drive to work on the state’s jam-packed highways or pile into Metro-North trains during the morning rush, the thought of commuting by sea might seem like a tranquil alternative -- but not necessarily a realistic transit option.

Kit4na / Creative Commons

A new climate change study looking at the northeast Atlantic Ocean points to a stressful future for some of the region's most iconic species. 

slack12 / Creative Commons

Millions of tons of sediment and sand could be dumped into the open waters of Long Island Sound in the coming decades. That’s according to a recently-unveiled federal plan outlining what to do with materials dredged from the bottoms of coastal ports and harbors.

5Gyres, Oregon State University / Creative Commons

A federal ban on tiny synthetic plastic spheres known as "microbeads" passed through Congress this week, following the lead of legislative action in several states including Connecticut.

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