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Live Music

An Ode To Yodeling

Oct 10, 2017
Matt Raible / Flickr

What is yodeling, anyway? Some consider it singing, some say it's an ululation, and still others consider it merely a means to herd animals. Whatever yodeling is, one's thing clear: Yodeling has been around for thousands of years and shows no signs of disappearing.

Copper Beech Institute

Recently, I hopped into my car to go home after a long and grinding first day back to work. I had just returned the day before from a two-week vacation exploring the treasures of two foreign countries I had never seen before. 

The abrupt transition from play to work left me feeling quite blue, made worse by my receding memories of those weeks. Something in me needed music.  So, I traded out my usual afternoon newscast for a "soul" song that caught my ear and brightened my heart. 

Best Video Film and Cultural Center in Hamden is asking the Greater New Haven community for funds to help keep it afloat. The store has thrived in the post-video rental era, but a series of setbacks may force the non-profit to close for good.

Best Video got its start in the 1980s, where it had a reputation for stocking classic and foreign films and other hard-to-find gems.

James Baker / flickr creative commons

Where have all the guitar heroes gone? Where has all the guitar music gone? Where have all the guitar sales gone?

Are rumors of the electric guitar's death exaggerated or no?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Coming up, we find out how New Haven's new Elm City Party Bike is motivating some to pedal for their beer.

But first, members of the Hartford-based, '90s-inspired rock band Audio Jane join us live in WNPR’s Studio 3.

We talk about their local roots and listen to songs off their 2017 release -- an album called Naive

Jean-Pierre Dalbéra / Creative Commons

Chartwell Dutiro is a Zimbabwe native and leading authority on the mbira tradition. He is also an experienced collaborator. This hour, we hear about his recent partnership with Timbila -- a band co-founded by Afropop Worldwide producer Banning Eyre. 

Diane Orson / WNPR

Remember when video stores seemed as ubiquitous as the corner grocery store? Today, few have been able to survive the onslaught of Netflix and online streaming.

Photo courtesty of Pantone Inc.

It’s St. Paddy’s Day! And did you know the 2017 color of the year is Greenery?

This hour, we find out more from the so called Authority on Color — Pantone. Plus, Connecticut based fiddler Dan Foster joins us to play some Irish tunes for the occasion — ahead of his band's Friday evening concert in Stonington. 

Takahiro Kyono. / Wikimedia Commons

Brian Wilson is, in many regards, the perfect musical artist for this moment. We need, for a dozen different reasons, the sweetness and sun of his best-known music. But what makes him more relevant is that undercurrent of melancholy which grew more and more prominent as his music grew less commercial. Who in 2017 does not identify with "I Just Wasn't Made For These Times," a song he wrote and recorded 51 years ago?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Twenty-five-year-old hip-hop artist John Manselle-Young is well-known on the Connecticut stage -- performing under the pseudonym Tang Sauce. Coming up, we sit down with the musician to talk about his latest projects and hear his music live on-air. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour: two musicians, two nations, one unifying sound. We sit down with Brazilian jazz artists Joe Carter and Isabella Mendes. We learn about their unique backgrounds and influences, and we listen to the music that brought them together. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour: two musicians, two nations, one unifying sound. We sit down with Brazilian jazz artists Joe Carter and Isabella Mendes. We learn about their unique backgrounds and influences, and we listen to the music that brought them together. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

For the third year in a row, "Big Al" Anderson and Jim Chapdelaine sing some songs and tell some stories as we usher out 2016. Anyone in the WNPR newsrooom who isn't still home for the holidays will become for one day only, the Dankosky Tabernacle Choir and sing their hearts out after such a tumultuous year.

Jay Corey

Listen to alto saxophonist Kris Allen’s splendid, new CD, Beloved, and you might well hear in his rich, expressive playing, evocations of but never imitations of Jackie McLean’s searing, soulful sound or Ornette Coleman’s profound, plaintively moving lyricism. 

HartfordSymphonyBlog.com

These days, just about everybody in the classical music world has an idea about how to enliven the concert experience.

Stephen Hough, the brilliant British-born pianist and composer, has just put forward what might be the single most effective one, not to mention unquestionably the least expensive: Make concerts shorter, already.

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