Emily Stanchfield / Creative Commons

Our weekly Monday afternoon "Scramble" continues the conversation arising from last week’s school shooting in Oregon. As the number of mass shootings continues to rise, the nationwide discussion has reached a stalemate. Is there a different, more effective way to talk about guns? 

After Thursday's mass shooting at an Oregon community college, which left nine people dead and more injured, President Obama aired his frustration over gun laws in the U.S. At a news conference Friday, he called on voters to push their representatives to take action.

"You just have to, for a while, be a single-issue voter, because that's what is happening on the other side," Obama said. "And that's going to take some time. I mean, the NRA has had a good start."

Consumer advocate and former presidential candidate Ralph Nader recently opened a museum filled with items like defective toys and unsafe machines all tied together under a unifying theme: tort law.

Unless you're a lawyer, you might not quite know the exact meaning of the word tort.

"It's a wrongful injury," Nader says. "It's a wrongful act that injures people and deserves a remedy."

Lee Werling / Flickr

With recent incidents like the ones in Ferguson and Baltimore, the issue of police training and leadership has come under the spotlight. Police commissioners and chiefs have either been fired or forced to resign due to some of these incidents. But police leadership may not be solely responsible for the practices and policies employed by cops on the street.

Massachusetts later this month will join with a majority of the other states and ban the sale of e-cigarettes to minors.  New statewide regulations will fill a void that led to a patchwork of local rules about the product that is growing in popularity while the health risks are unknown.

Wikipedia / Creative Commons

Newtown and its schools are putting up a stiff legal fight against a wrongful-death lawsuit filed by the parents of two children killed in the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting.

Wikimedia / Creative Commons

The state's top prosecutor wants the Connecticut Supreme Court to reconsider its recent landmark decision to completely eliminate the death penalty in the state. The Connecticut Law Tribune reports that Chief State's Attorney Kevin Kane has filed a motion for argument and motions to strike the 4-3 decision, which was handed down in August.

Laura Ouimette / Creative Commons

As Hartford voters prepare to pick their next mayor, there's another mayor whose name keeps coming up. Eddie Perez was convicted more than five years ago on corruption-related charges. Now, his case may soon get a hearing at the state's highest court. 

A new report from Yale Law School looks at solitary confinement in the U.S. 

Massachusetts is joining a national movement to reexamine get-tough-on-crime policies.

Massachusetts state leaders earlier this month committed to a comprehensive review of the state’s criminal justice policies with a goal to reduce the cost of incarceration and improve public safety by reducing recidivism. 

John Phelan / Wikimedia Commons

Last week, the state Supreme Court issued its ruling on capital punishment and completely repealed it - including for those already on death row. This hour on our weekly news roundtable, The Wheelhouse we talk about the decision and answer your questions about how the state’s judicial system works with guests who will hopefully have answers.

Yale University / Creative Commons

A national fraternity at Yale University is headed to trial in the case of a 2011 crash that killed a woman and injured two others.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

From a 12-year-old girl to a 73-year-old farmer, Connecticut has executed about 160 people over the nearly 400-year history of the death penalty. Two state justices invoked that history while writing in support of the court's decision to overturn capital punishment. 

Thomas MacMillan / New Haven Independent

Connecticut's Supreme Court has ruled the state's death penalty is unconstitutional. WNPR spoke to the public defender who represented one of the state's best known death row inmates.

John Phelan / Creative Commons

The Connecticut Supreme Court ruled in favor of a full repeal of the state's death penalty on Thursday.

The decision comes more than three years after a repeal of the death penalty for crimes committed after the law was enacted. It means that eleven people currently on death row in the state will be spared execution.

How Police in Connecticut Identify Body Parts

Aug 10, 2015
CIMMYT/Flickr Creative Commons

If you've ever wondered how the police identify found body parts, an ongoing investigation in New Haven provides a case study.

Office of Gov. Dannel Malloy

Governor Dannel Malloy has signed into law a bill that better protects underage victims of sex trafficking, while giving police more tools to identify and prosecute traffickers.

A Glimpse Into The Dark Side of Technology

Jul 27, 2015
elhombredenegro/flickr creative commons

We all depend on technology and its vast, positive potential on everything from poverty to medicine, but there’s a flip side. As we gear up for the Internet of Things, with greater connections come greater risks. 


A Connecticut man who videotaped a homemade "drone" flying and firing a handgun in Clinton is now the subject of an FAA investigation.

The 14-second video shows a small hovering flying machine. It's black with four spinning propellers and there's a semiautomatic handgun strapped on top. As it hovers, it fires four shots into a wooded area before the video cuts out. / Creative Commons

Though it often seems like a distant institution, the U.S. Supreme Court affects our lives more than you might think. 


This hour -- from its recent rulings on health care and same-sex marriage, to its role in the upcoming presidential election -- we take an intimate look inside the world of the nation's top court. 

Lori Mack / WNPR

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch was in Connecticut on Tuesday as part of a national community policing tour.

Wasted Time R / Creative Commons

Quinnipiac University has filed a lawsuit against the town of Hamden in a zoning violation dispute. The move follows a zoning board decision to deny the university’s appeal of a recent finding that the school violated a zoning deal for its York Hill dormitory project.

U.S. Department of Agriculture / Creative Commons

Advocates for the poor have argued that the state takes too long to process food stamp applications, and that people should have a right to sue. State attorneys have pushed back. But last week, a federal appellate court ruled that applicants can in fact file a class action against the state. 

Josh Michtom / Creative Commons

Police say the body of a seven-month-old boy who has been missing since his father jumped into the Connecticut River with him two days ago has been found.

Lionel Allorge

A federal appeals court says people applying for food stamps in Connecticut have the right to sue the state over delays in processing their applications.

CT Senate Democrats / Flickr

The Connecticut General Assembly returned to Hartford for a special session Monday, and while the state Senate spent the afternoon deliberating the two budget bills, the House of Representatives took up the "excessive force bill."

Updated at 10:46 a.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court, in a 5-4 opinion, says the sedative used in Oklahoma's lethal injection cocktail does not violate the U.S. Constitution's ban on cruel and unusual punishment.

Here's the background to the case, in the words of SCOTUSblog:

Daily Joe / Creative Commons

The EPA has issued new guidelines for underground gasoline tanks, changes the agency hopes will beef up safety standards for containers underneath gas stations and convenience stores in Connecticut.

Updated at 1 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday handed the Obama administration a major victory on health care, ruling 6-3 that nationwide subsidies called for in the Affordable Care Act are legal.

"Congress passed the Affordable Care Act to improve health insurance markets, not to destroy them," the court's majority said in the opinion, which was written by Chief Justice John Roberts. But they acknowledged that "petitioners' arguments about the plain meaning ... are strong."

In the wake of last week's Charleston, S.C., church shootings, 2016 Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders explained his competing concerns between gun rights and gun safety.

"I think guns and gun control is an issue that needs to be discussed," Sanders told NPR's David Greene in an interview airing on Thursday's Morning Edition. "Let me add to that, I think that urban America has got to respect what rural America is about, where 99 percent of the people in my state who hunt are law abiding people."