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The East Haven police department has acquired a new piece of equipment to protect one of its most valued employees. 

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On the eve of the latest report into traffic stops and racial profiling in the state, The Connecticut Police Chiefs Association released a peer-reviewed study that questions the report's methodology.

jglazer75 / Creative Commons

On Friday at 5:00 pm, the Connecticut Public Affairs Network stopped its operations of CT-N, a network founded in 1999 to independently cover all three branches of state government.

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One of the men who pleaded not guilty Monday in the ongoing probe of the 2016 election has deep Connecticut ties.

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Paul Manafort and his former business associate Rick Gates surrendered Monday morning to special counsel Robert Mueller after he asked them to do so. The New York Times reports the charges are for money laundering, tax and foreign lobbying. 

The indictments come after CNN reported Friday night that a federal grand jury had approved the first charges in the Russia investigation led by special counsel and former FBI director, Robert Mueller. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

According to the Gun Violence Archive, nearly 900 people have been shot and killed in the U.S. since the mass shooting October 1 in Las Vegas. U.S. Senator Chris Murphy along with Senator Richard Blumenthal and others introduced legislation on Wednesday that would expand federal background checks.

In her day job, Chicopee, Massachusetts, attorney Tahirah Amatul-Wadud does family law -- divorce, custody, child support. But on her own time, she's filed civil rights lawsuits on behalf of Muslim communities who feel threatened, especially African-American Muslims like herself.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The first year of Hartford’s new minor league baseball stadium is complete, but the legal fights concerning the land surrounding it are far from over. On Monday, the city announced that it formally terminated Centerplan from further work. 

Gage Skidmore, Peoria Arizona / Wikimedia Commons

President Trump pardoned former Maricopa County sheriff Joe Arpaio Friday. Arpaio was not going to jail for his documented brutality against immigrants, failure to investigate complaints of sexual assault, or his  arrest of journalists critical of his policies. He was going to jail for repeated contempt of a judicial order to stop illegally detaining immigrants. Arpaio and our president seem to both hold contempt for the laws they were elected to uphold. 

Muzeum Lubelskie w Lublinie / Courtesty of Stacey Fitzgerald

During World War II the Nazis experimented on Polish women among others at Ravensbrück concentration camp outside of Berlin. After the war, socialite and Connecticut resident Caroline Ferriday helped bring dozens of these women to the U.S. for medical treatment. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

New Fairfield resident Joel Colindres said he’s grateful to have been given a temporary stay from deportation by immigration officials.

“I just want nobody in the world to go through this. The pain that we’ve been having all this time -- it’s very hard,” Colindres said at a press conference Friday.

On Thursday, a federal judge granted Colindres the stay only 90 minutes before his plane was scheduled to take off for his native country of Guatemala.

Rachel Eliza Griffiths

Although there’s no law preventing former convicted felons from practicing law in Connecticut, it’s state regulation that any applicant for the bar exam must prove “his or her good moral character and fitness to practice law by clear and convincing evidence.”

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A New Fairfield man ordered to be deported to his native Guatemala says he could be at risk of violence or kidnapping if he returns. Joel Colindres came to the United States illegally in 2004. He married a U.S. citizen in 2010 and they have two young children.

Daniel X. O'Neil / Creative Commons

Justice for all? Or justice for the privileged?

This hour, we hear how one Connecticut-based incubator is helping vulnerable residents gain access to counsel. We also examine more wide-ranging efforts to narrow the country’s “justice gap.” 

On a recent morning in Texas, Fort Worth police arrested a man who threatened to burn down his girlfriend's apartment. The officers also detained two Mexican nationals at the apartment complex because they suspected them of being in the country illegally.

Then police called ICE Fugitive Operations. Soon men with guns and dark ballistic vests swarmed the parking lot.

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