law

If you’re in Connecticut, you can’t just walk into a store and buy a Tesla. That’s because of a state law that says car companies like Tesla can’t bypass dealers and sell directly to customers. 

Oklahoma lawmakers have passed a bill that makes performing an abortion a felony.

NPR's Jennifer Ludden told our Newscast unit that the bill is the first of its kind, and an pro-abortion rights group plans to sue if the governor signs the bill into law. Gov. Mary Fallin has not yet indicated what she plans to do. Here's more from Jennifer:

Attorney Mitchell Garabedian is calling for a federal investigation of sexual abuse allegations at private schools in New England, such as the Fessenden School in Newton.

Adam Frenier / NEPR

A Berkshire Superior Court judge has granted Kinder Morgan an injunction, allowing it to go forward with a natural gas pipeline in Sandisfield, Massachusetts, on its way to Connecticut. But the judge did issue conditions.

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Connecticut legislators adjourned late Wednesday without passing a state budget or Governor Dannel Malloy's criminal justice bill. 

Doctors in Vermont will soon face new limits on the number of narcotic pain pills they can prescribe to patients.

A last-minute offer by electric carmaker Tesla Motors to open a regional distribution center in Connecticut may not be enough to persuade lawmakers to pass a bill allowing the company to sell its vehicles directly to consumers.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Consumer advocate Ralph Nader spent the better part of two decades dreaming up a museum with a highly specific, slightly bizarre theme: tort law. In late 2015, that dream became a reality with the opening of the American Museum of Tort Law in downtown Winsted, Connecticut.

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Beth Ostrowski spends most of her day in her car.

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The Connecticut House has passed a bill late Wednesday night that would prohibit anyone with a temporary restraining order against them from possessing firearms. It now heads to the Senate for consideration.

Ray Hardman / WNPR

The Yale Babylonian Collection has been given an immense trove of ancient artifacts from the Near East. Among the items in the collection are hundreds of cylinder seals.

The fate of one of President Obama's controversial executive actions on immigration goes before the Supreme Court on Monday. The action would grant temporary, quasi-legal status and work permits to as many as 4 million parents who entered the U.S. illegally prior to 2010. The president's order applies only to parents of children who are U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents.

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A Connecticut Superior Court judge has ruled that the lawsuit against the maker of the rifle used in the 2012 shootings at the Sandy Hook Elementary School can go forward. 

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The Massachusetts Attorney General’s office has filed its opposition to an injunction request by Kinder Morgan. The company wants to build a natural gas pipeline which would run through state-owned conservation land in Southern Berkshire County on its way to Connecticut.

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Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders is attracting criticism from members of Connecticut's congressional delegation after comments he made about shielding the gun industry from legal liability. 

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It's been 16 years since Connecticut passed its Safe Haven law to protect newborns. The state Department of Children and Families says in that time, 27 babies have been brought to local hospitals.

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Proponents of legalizing marijuana in Connecticut are urging state lawmakers to capitalize on the "novelty factor" of becoming the first New England state to allow recreational use of the drug. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

In the decade since Connecticut first adopted a human trafficking law, not a single person has been convicted.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Consumer advocate Ralph Nader spent the better part of two decades dreaming up a museum with a highly specific, slightly bizarre theme: tort law. In late 2015, that dream became a reality with the opening of the American Museum of Tort Law in downtown Winsted, Connecticut. 

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

On Monday, March 28, a federal judge may rule on whether immigration officials must allow two former Connecticut residents back into the country to talk about why they were deported. 

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A bill that would allow children with certain medical conditions to be prescribed marijuana passed a key legislative committee Monday. 

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Yale University's expulsion of the basketball team captain last month is adding to growing criticism nationwide about how colleges investigate and discipline students accused of sexual misconduct.

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This hour, our news roundtable The Wheelhouse tackles some of the biggest political stories of the week. We discuss everything from state budget cuts, to automatic voter registration, to a "legislative mystery" that's got everyone asking: Who added language to the SEEC's bill? 

Harriet Jones / WNPR

MGM Resorts International, the gaming group building a casino in Springfield, is now funding a lawsuit by the Schaghticoke Tribal Nation against Connecticut’s proposed third casino. 

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There was controversy at the Capitol Thursday over a bill which would allow police officers to require gun owners to produce their permit to carry a firearm. At the moment, they can’t demand to see a permit unless they can see the firearm and suspect criminal activity. 

CT-N Screenshot

Yes means yes.

That's essentially what affirmative consent means: that all parties who engage in a sexual activity have to clearly indicate that they want to. 

"My friends are scared, and I am scared," said Yale student Hannah Schmitt, speaking to the General Assembly's Higher Education and Employment Advancement Committee on Tuesday.

Trevor Huxham / Creative Commons

Advocates and critics of gun control sparred last week at the University of Connecticut over how much regulation is allowed under the Second Amendment, and whether the amendment was written primarily for individuals or militias.

After hearing oral arguments on what could be one of the most important abortion cases decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in decades, NPR's Nina Totenberg says that the only thing that is certain is that Justice Anthony Kennedy will cast the deciding vote.

As expected, Nina says, the three conservatives and four liberals on the court stuck to their positions for and against a Texas law that puts restrictions on abortions.

AUGUSTA, Maine - Maine Sen. Susan Collins has joined the growing number of senators calling for passage of the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act. 

The measure would provide for additional prevention and education efforts aimed at the drug crisis and for additional resources to treat addicted jail inmates.

"It is clear Mr. President that we need to take a comprehensive approach to this epidemic and the bill before us is a vital step forward," Collins said today on the Senate floor.

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Connecticut’s Claims Commissioner J. Paul Vance Jr. recently resigned his position. He had been at the center of a controversy for awarding $16.8 million to four men whose murder convictions in a 1996 gang­-related shooting were overturned. Because of this recent award, lawmakers are looking to make changes to the state’s wrongful incarceration statute.

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