WNPR

law

Voice of America / Wikimedia Commons

Khizr Khan entered a life in the public eye after he spoke at the Democratic National Convention last summer, challenging then-Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump to read the U.S. Constitution.

This hour, we speak to the Pakistani American and Gold Star Father about life after that memorable speech, and why he continues to travel around the country to speak on behalf of religious and minority rights. 

The city of Miami can sue Wells Fargo and Bank of America for damages under the Fair Housing Act, the Supreme Court says, allowing a lawsuit to continue that accuses the big banks of causing economic harm with discriminatory and predatory lending practices.

The 5-3 vote saw Chief Justice John Roberts form a majority with the court's more liberal justices. Justice Anthony Kennedy, widely seen as the court's "swing" justice, sided with Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito. The court's newest justice, Neil Gorsuch, wasn't involved in the case.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It’s been nearly 50 years since a US Supreme Court decision put an end to state laws banning interracial marriage.

This hour, we learn about the civil rights case, Loving v. Virginia. Have society’s perceptions really changed from that landmark decision in 1967?

Lawmakers in the Connecticut House of Representatives voted unanimously on Wednesday to create more opportunities for locally brewed beer in the state.

Keith Allison flickr.com/photos/keithallison / Creatiive Commons

Attorney General Jeff Sessions recently urged cities, counties, and states to honor federal immigration detainer requests, saying if they don’t, they could lose federal money. Specifically, if an immigrant here illegally is arrested, he wants local law enforcement to continue to hold onto that person until federal immigration officials can pick them up.

But Connecticut officials say it’s not that easy -- and it may not be lawful. 

Pages