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law

Lenna Utro-Shterenberg / Creative Commons

Robert Mueller on Friday indicted 13 Russian nationals and three organizations on charges related to interference in the 2016 U.S. electoral process. 

Charles Bulfinch / Creative Commons

Legend holds that years after the the Hartford Convention, a visitor from the South was touring the Old State House and asked to be shown the room where the Convention met. Ushered into the Senate chamber, the southerner looked at the crimson in the face of George Washington in the Gilbert Stuart portrait hanging here and said, "I'll be damned if he's got the blush off yet."

Uli Rahms / Flickr

The word bastard hasn't always been meant to offend. Used simply as an indication of illegitimate birth at first, the label bastard didn't bring with it shame or stigmatization until long after it first appeared in the Middle Ages.

White House / Wikimedia Commons

Special counsel Robert Mueller has already charged several people associated with the Trump campaign with crimes uncovered in his investigation into Russian interference in our 2016 presidential election. Yet, some some believe there's a good chance he won't indict President Trump - even if he finds wrongdoing. 

TonyNetone / Creative Commons

The central question in Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation is whether a foreign agent interfered in our electoral process and whether the Trump campaign colluded in that effort. 

WSAR - Own work/creative commons

Columbia, South Carolina is one of the first cities to ban the use of gun bump stocks - an attachment that enables a semiautomatic rifle to fire faster. 

Rod Waddington / Creative Commons

Five years ago, 20 first graders and six adults were gunned down at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut. Following the massacre, the state enacted some of the toughest gun laws in the nation.

Lori Mack/WNPR

The East Haven police department has acquired a new piece of equipment to protect one of its most valued employees. 

Jeffrey Smith / Creative Commons

On the eve of the latest report into traffic stops and racial profiling in the state, The Connecticut Police Chiefs Association released a peer-reviewed study that questions the report's methodology.

jglazer75 / Creative Commons

On Friday at 5:00 pm, the Connecticut Public Affairs Network stopped its operations of CT-N, a network founded in 1999 to independently cover all three branches of state government.

Disney-ABC Television Group / Creative Commons

One of the men who pleaded not guilty Monday in the ongoing probe of the 2016 election has deep Connecticut ties.

Marco Verch / Creative Commons

Paul Manafort and his former business associate Rick Gates surrendered Monday morning to special counsel Robert Mueller after he asked them to do so. The New York Times reports the charges are for money laundering, tax and foreign lobbying. 

The indictments come after CNN reported Friday night that a federal grand jury had approved the first charges in the Russia investigation led by special counsel and former FBI director, Robert Mueller. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

According to the Gun Violence Archive, nearly 900 people have been shot and killed in the U.S. since the mass shooting October 1 in Las Vegas. U.S. Senator Chris Murphy along with Senator Richard Blumenthal and others introduced legislation on Wednesday that would expand federal background checks.

In her day job, Chicopee, Massachusetts, attorney Tahirah Amatul-Wadud does family law -- divorce, custody, child support. But on her own time, she's filed civil rights lawsuits on behalf of Muslim communities who feel threatened, especially African-American Muslims like herself.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The first year of Hartford’s new minor league baseball stadium is complete, but the legal fights concerning the land surrounding it are far from over. On Monday, the city announced that it formally terminated Centerplan from further work. 

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