Mark Fischer / Creative Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments Monday in a landmark case that could potentially limit teachers’ unions from collecting fees from non-members. New Haven has joined an amicus brief filed in the case.

It's the showdown at the Supreme Court Corral on Monday for public employee unions and their opponents.

Union opponents are seeking to reverse a 1977 Supreme Court decision that allows public employee unions to collect so-called "fair share fees."

Twenty-three states authorize collecting these fees from those who don't join the union but benefit from a contract that covers them.

Connecticut's largest teachers union wants state lawmakers and the governor to replace a controversial standardized test administered to students in grades three through eight.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

In a preliminary vote Thursday night, musicians of the Hartford Symphony Orchestra rejected — by secret ballot — a labor offer and wage cuts proposed by HSO management.  

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

After a year of contentious negotiations, protests, and the threat of a shutdown, the Hartford Symphony Orchestra and its musicians may be edging closer to an agreement on a new contract.

Seventeen miners at a salt mine in western New York were freed early this morning after they were trapped hundreds of feet underground when the elevator they were in stopped working late Wednesday night.

Steup / Flickr Creative Commons

To the list of things you can't avoid -- death and taxes -- we now add losing your job to a machine. A worry typically reserved for those in manufacturing, automation in the workplace is now a reality of nearly all occupations, and it's only getting worse... or is it?

Hartford Symphony Orchestra / Facebook

Last week, the Hartford Symphony Orchestra said it may have to close its doors for good if HSO musicians won't come to the negotiating table to hammer out a new contract. Now, the union that represents the musicians has responded to those claims.

Nate Gagnon / WNPR

The board that oversees the Hartford Symphony Orchestra said it could be forced to shut down unless a union that represents musicians is willing to make concessions.

Eric Westervelt of the NPR Ed team is guest-hosting for the next few weeks on Here & Now, the midday news program from NPR and WBUR.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

College professors say that the state's higher education system is not employing enough full-time teachers. And some professors claim this has caused the full-time faculty to look down on their adjunct colleagues. 

Central Connecticut State University

Faculty at Connecticut's state universities are negotiating with the Board of Regents over a new three-year contract. Last month the new president of the Board, Mark Ojakian joined us to discuss the negotiations from his perspective. This hour, we hear from several of the professors pushing back against cuts and other changes in the public higher education system.

One of the state’s largest employers is about to undergo a major change in ownership. Keurig Green Mountain, the Waterbury-based coffee company that employs more than 600 people statewide, is to be bought by an investor group for $13.9 billion. But state officials say they’re confident that Vermont workers will keep their jobs.

The South Korean labor leader holed up in a Buddhist temple to avoid arrest has turned himself in on charges of organizing illegal rallies, ending a 24-day standoff with police. Officers had planned to raid Seoul's top temple, Jogyesa, on Wednesday afternoon, but postponed a move to forcefully enter the temple after negotiations with the head of the Buddhist Jogye order.

Sarah Flaherty / WNPR

Roughly 100 college students and professors gathered in Hartford on Thursday to protest proposed changes to the state's higher education system.

Hartford Symphony Orchestra / Facebook

It's well into the Hartford Symphony Orchestra's new season, and HSO musicians still don't have a new contract. The musicians are asking management for "shared sacrifice" to reach an agreement.

myfuturedotcom / Creative Commons

Union leaders said they've reached a tentative deal that will stop a threatened strike at 20 Connecticut nursing homes and provide a $15 per hour minimum wage to certified nursing assistants. 

Mattpopovich / Creative Commons

Organized labor and the state's chief business group are taking the first steps in an unlikely alliance to confront Connecticut's slow economic growth. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The National Labor Relations Board has filed a complaint against the Hartford Symphony Orchestra for failing to come to the bargaining table to hammer out a new contract with the orchestra's musicians.

Nate Gagnon / WNPR

At a rally on the steps of the state Capitol Wednesday, a huge crowd came out to support the musicians of the Hartford Symphony Orchestra who are being asked to take a huge pay cut next season. 

White House

President Obama announced an executive order requiring paid sick leave for more than 300,000 employees of federal contractors Monday morning.

Creative Commons

More than 100 firefighters are suing the city of New Haven in federal court over lost wages.

The New Haven Register reports 174 current and former firefighters claim that the fire department failed to accurately calculate their regular rates for overtime compensation, which they said violates the Fair Labor Standards Act.

Hiring an employee is an expensive proposition. Workers' compensation, social security and other expenses can run thousands of dollars a year, so it's no surprise that companies often try to reduce expenses keeping workers off the payroll, calling them independent contractors instead.

But sometimes they do so in violation of state law. And in a new report, State Auditor Doug Hoffer says the state isn't doing enough to stop a practice known as "misclassification."

Unemployment Down, But Dream Jobs Still Out Of Reach

Aug 31, 2015













In New York and Connecticut, unemployment is at 5.4 percent, the lowest it has been in seven years. Nationwide, unemployment has dropped its lowest levels since the recession, giving those entering the workforce more opportunity. But for many, that elusive dream job is still out of reach. 

Quinn Dombrowski / Creative Commons

Connecticut labor officials have shut nearly two dozen nail salons, recovered more than $47,000 in wages allegedly owed to employees and penalized businesses $100,000 for alleged pay and records violations.