labor

Harriet Jones

The Connecticut Low Wage Employer Advisory Board is holding its third hearing on Wednesday in Bridgeport. 

The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

New Haven Votes No Confidence in Police Chief

Jul 8, 2016
Markeshia Ricks / New Haven Independent

The Elm City Local union voted no confidence in Police Chief Dean Esserman on Thursday, according to the New Haven Independent.

Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

Layoffs are continuing in Connecticut state government, with 166 employees at the Department of Correction receiving pink slips.

Uber drivers will stay independent contractors, not employees, in California and Massachusetts, just as the ride-booking company had maintained they were. Uber is settling class action lawsuits by drivers in the two states for a maximum of $100 million.

In a statement, the company says it will pay the plaintiffs $84 million, plus another $16 million if Uber goes public and within a year increases in value by one and a half times over its worth in December.

Harriet Jones

Hundreds of workers in Hartford are expected to go on strike Thursday in the long-running campaign to raise the minimum wage. The one-day stoppage once again calls for $15.00 an hour.

A coal-mining giant has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection amid an industrywide slump.

Peabody Energy — which is the biggest coal miner in the U.S. and says it is the largest private-sector coal company in the world — is looking to restructure its heavy debt load and gain relief from its creditors. It hopes to continue operations unimpeded.

Nearly 40,000 workers at Verizon have gone on strike, objecting to, among other things, outsourcing and temporary location transfers.

The two unions representing Verizon workers say their employees have been without a contract since August. They call the walkout, which began at 6 a.m. ET Wednesday, "by far the largest work stoppage in the country in recent years."

NPR's Joel Rose tells our Newscast unit:

"The striking employees mostly work in Verizon's wireline business — landline phone, video and Internet — on the East Coast.

Photo Phiend / Creative Commons

The first round of layoff notices have been given out to state workers as Governor Dannel Malloy works to confront looming deficits.

Tom Page / Creative Commons

Unions representing more than 36,000 Verizon landline phone and cable workers are threatening a strike starting Wednesday morning if the company doesn't agree to a new contract.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin took office in January, and his honeymoon is officially over. The mayor is trying to figure out a way to balance the city’s budget. 

The U.S. Supreme Court has deadlocked on a 4-4 vote in a major labor case. The court, without further comment, announced the tie vote Tuesday. The result is that union opponents have failed, for now, to reverse a long-standing decision that allows states to mandate "fair share" fees from nonunion workers.

DC Central Kitchen / Creative Commons

They say it's important to eat breakfast every day. But what if you eat two breakfasts?

According to a new study, students who eat two breakfasts -- one at home and one at school -- are less likely to experience unhealthy weight gain than students who skip the meal altogether

Adavyd / Creative Commons

Time in the legislative session is starting to run down and the list of things to do remains long. This week on our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, we’re joined by Capitol reporters to catch us up on what is (and isn’t) getting done. Governor Dannel Malloy is going up against labor unions and asking for concessions to help with the budget but the rank and file union members haven't authorized a renegotiation of the current contract.

Vimeo / Metro Square Media

One of the largest state employee unions in the Hartford area has launched a television ad campaign to address the threat of more than 1,000 job cuts amid Connecticut's budget shortfall.

neetalparekh via flickr.com / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s unemployment rate jogged upward in December, even as the state added 300 jobs. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Over the long months of the Hartford Symphony Orchestra contract dispute with its players, two questions, among many others, have been heard with regularity.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A year-long labor dispute between the Hartford Symphony Orchestra and its musicians has reached a critical point. 

Mark Fischer / Creative Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments Monday in a landmark case that could potentially limit teachers’ unions from collecting fees from non-members. New Haven has joined an amicus brief filed in the case.

It's the showdown at the Supreme Court Corral on Monday for public employee unions and their opponents.

Union opponents are seeking to reverse a 1977 Supreme Court decision that allows public employee unions to collect so-called "fair share fees."

Twenty-three states authorize collecting these fees from those who don't join the union but benefit from a contract that covers them.

Connecticut's largest teachers union wants state lawmakers and the governor to replace a controversial standardized test administered to students in grades three through eight.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

In a preliminary vote Thursday night, musicians of the Hartford Symphony Orchestra rejected — by secret ballot — a labor offer and wage cuts proposed by HSO management.  

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

After a year of contentious negotiations, protests, and the threat of a shutdown, the Hartford Symphony Orchestra and its musicians may be edging closer to an agreement on a new contract.

Seventeen miners at a salt mine in western New York were freed early this morning after they were trapped hundreds of feet underground when the elevator they were in stopped working late Wednesday night.

Steup / Flickr Creative Commons

To the list of things you can't avoid -- death and taxes -- we now add losing your job to a machine. A worry typically reserved for those in manufacturing, automation in the workplace is now a reality of nearly all occupations, and it's only getting worse... or is it?

Hartford Symphony Orchestra / Facebook

Last week, the Hartford Symphony Orchestra said it may have to close its doors for good if HSO musicians won't come to the negotiating table to hammer out a new contract. Now, the union that represents the musicians has responded to those claims.

Nate Gagnon / WNPR

The board that oversees the Hartford Symphony Orchestra said it could be forced to shut down unless a union that represents musicians is willing to make concessions.

Eric Westervelt of the NPR Ed team is guest-hosting for the next few weeks on Here & Now, the midday news program from NPR and WBUR.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

College professors say that the state's higher education system is not employing enough full-time teachers. And some professors claim this has caused the full-time faculty to look down on their adjunct colleagues. 

Central Connecticut State University

Faculty at Connecticut's state universities are negotiating with the Board of Regents over a new three-year contract. Last month the new president of the Board, Mark Ojakian joined us to discuss the negotiations from his perspective. This hour, we hear from several of the professors pushing back against cuts and other changes in the public higher education system.

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