WNPR

justice

Updated at 6:25 p.m. ET

Attorney General Jeff Sessions told the House Judiciary Committee Tuesday that his "story has never changed" about his and other Trump campaign officials' connections to Russia.

"I will not accept, and reject accusations that I have ever lied," Sessions said. "That is a lie!"

Annette Elizabeth Allen / NPR

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is back on Capitol Hill for a House Judiciary Committee hearing about his oversight of the Justice Department. He is also likely to face questions about Trump campaign contacts with Russia.

For Attorney General Jeff Sessions, an appearance before the House Judiciary Committee Tuesday presents a risk — and an opportunity.

The risk lies in testifying under oath, for the fourth time this year, about his awareness of Russian efforts to interfere in the 2016 election while he served as a top surrogate for President Trump.

Updated Saturday at 9:10 p.m. ET

One morning earlier this year, Northern Arapaho member Rose was sitting at the table with her 14-year-old daughter, Latoya.

Updated at 4:20 p.m. ET

Apparent Russian agents began reaching out to Donald Trump's presidential campaign as early as March 2016, the Justice Department established in documents released Monday, with appeals for partnership and offers of help including "dirt" on Trump's opponent, Hillary Clinton.

That case is made in charging documents in the case of then-Trump foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos, who pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI.

A judge has acquitted former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley of first-degree murder in the shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith in late 2011. The verdict over Smith's killing has been highly anticipated — and it prompted protests outside the courthouse.

Here's an overview of the case from St. Louis Public Radio:

The Justice Department has notified Senate investigators that it will not make FBI officials available for interviews because doing so could pose conflicts with the work of special counsel Robert Mueller.

Leaders of the Senate Judiciary Committee had sought to meet with the FBI's chief of staff, James Rybicki, and the executive assistant director of its national security branch, Carl Ghattas, as part of their review into the dismissal of then-FBI Director James Comey earlier this year.

Lori Mack / WNPR

Connecticut U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal held an emergency hearing in New Haven Monday. The purpose was to gather testimony on the impact of President Trump’s immigration policies.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut’s chief state’s attorney believes some of the latest reforms to the juvenile justice system may have gone too far. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Calling it a "sad and outrageous day," Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal has called on Congress to quickly replace the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Juvenile justice reform often focuses on changing a system in which the majority of delinquents are boys. But how do courts and community providers address the needs of girls?

This hour, we find out what advocates have learned from a new report on girls in Connecticut's juvenile justice system. 

President Trump has pardoned controversial former Sheriff Joe Arpaio for a misdemeanor criminal contempt conviction.

A statement issued by the White House Friday night said, "Today, President Donald J. Trump granted a Presidential pardon to Joe Arpaio, former Sheriff of Maricopa County, Arizona."

Known as "America's Toughest Sheriff," Arpaio gained a reputation for his harsh — his critics would say cruel — treatment of immigrants in the country illegally.

Robin Lubbock / WBUR

Low-income communities and communities of color are disproportionately affected by the consequences of climate change -- think New Orleans and Hurricane Katrina. These areas suffer from poor air quality, increasing temperatures, and extreme weather.

Rachel Eliza Griffiths

Although there’s no law preventing former convicted felons from practicing law in Connecticut, it’s state regulation that any applicant for the bar exam must prove “his or her good moral character and fitness to practice law by clear and convincing evidence.”

The Justice Department has experienced an "explosion" in the number of referrals, or requests for probes, this year from intelligence agencies over the leak of classified information, prompting the attorney general to consider whether to loosen regulations on when it can subpoena media organizations.

Pages