journalism

Where We Live
9:00 am
Fri July 18, 2014

The Modern Age of Science; Connecticut Bull Osborndale Ivanhoe

Horia Varlan
Creative Commons

Back in March, a team of Harvard scientists claimed to have found the first direct evidence of gravity waves from the Big Bang. Within a matter of hours, their story had made its way around the Internet, spreading across blogs, news sites, and social media.

Read more
Journalism
10:35 am
Tue July 15, 2014

NPR News Executive Leaves For Job At The Atlantic

Margaret Low Smith is leaving her post as NPR News' senior vice president to become president of AtlanticLIVE.
Stephen Voss NPR

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 12:14 pm

Margaret Low Smith, a longtime NPR executive who has served as senior vice president for news for three years, is leaving the company to become the president of The Atlantic's live events business.

"Her departure will be felt as profoundly as any in recent memory," NPR Chief Content Officer Kinsey Wilson wrote in a memo to staff Tuesday.

He added that Smith's final day at NPR will be at the end of July. She joined the company in 1982 as an overnight production assistant on Morning Edition.

Wilson added that:

Read more
Beyond The Microphone
8:01 am
Sat July 5, 2014

The Letter That Kicked Off A Radio Career

When NPR's Tamara Keith was 15 years old, she embarked on a letter-writing campaign that set her career in motion.
Courtesy Keith Family

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 11:36 am

The letter started like this:

Dear Mr. Simon,

Hi, I am a 15 year old high school senior, and I need help.
You see, my fondest desire (right after being an MTV VeeJay Chick) is to be a reporter for NPR. I really need some career advice. Living in a town where 80% of the population have four legs and udders and the high school a nationally recognized milk tasting team, I need some outside help.

Read more
Where We Live
9:00 am
Fri June 27, 2014

The Modern Age of Science; Connecticut Bull Osborndale Ivanhoe

Horia Varlan
Creative Commons

Back in March, a team of Harvard scientists claimed to have found the first direct evidence of gravity waves from the Big Bang. Within a matter of hours, their story had made its way around the Internet, spreading across blogs, news sites, and social media.

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
11:11 am
Tue May 27, 2014

A Conversation With Joe Muto On FOX Holes, Gawker, and Media Machines

Joe Muto.
Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

On any given day, it's pretty easy to find all the ways in which modern media has substituted politicization for truth and/or serious reflection. Today, you could take the so-called Santa Barbara killing spree by Elliot Rodger. After the usual first round of back and forth sniping about the availability of weapons.

Read more
Journalism
11:43 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Fired 'New York Times' Editor: 'Losing A Job You Love Hurts'

Jill Abramson
Evan Agostini AP

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 1:39 pm

Jill Abramson, the former executive editor of The New York Times, addressed her sudden and controversial firing during a commencement address at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, N.C., on Monday.

"Sure, losing a job you love hurts," she admitted. "But the work I revered, journalism that holds powerful institutions and people accountable, is what makes our democracy so resilient. This is the work I will remain very much a part of."

Read more
Commencement Speeches
11:34 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Abramson To Wake Forest Grads: 'Show What You're Made Of'

Jill Abramson, former executive editor of The New York Times, speaks at the commencement ceremony at Wake Forest University on Monday.
Nell Redmond AP

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 2:49 pm

When Wake Forest University officials invited Jill Abramson to deliver this year's commencement speech, they probably didn't realize they'd be in the midst of one of the biggest media controversies of the year.

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
9:44 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Bob Garfield is Off the Media and On The Scramble

Bob Garfield.
Credit WNYC

Bob Garfield, host of WNYC's On The Media, kicks off this edition of The Scramble. Something tells us The New York Times' Jill Abramson saga isn't over...

Read more
Code Switch
8:44 am
Fri May 16, 2014

A Complicated First: A Black Editor Takes The Helm At The Gray Lady

The New York Times removed the first woman to ever hold its top editor post and replaced her with the first person of color to ever do so.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 6:58 pm

When New York Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger removed Jill Abramson from the paper's executive editor spot on Wednesday, it stunned the media world. Abramson was the first woman to ever fill the paper's top post and was credited with helping right its fiscal ship, and much of the early coverage about just why she was pushed out centered on a possible dispute over her pay, which was less than her male predecessors' compensation.

Read more
Journalism
2:55 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

'New York Times' Replaces Jill Abramson As Executive Editor

Jill Abramson
Evan Agostini AP

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 11:57 pm

This story was updated at 6:30 p.m. ET.

The New York Times is replacing Executive Editor Jill Abramson with Dean Baquet, the paper's managing editor.

Abramson, who took the top spot at the newspaper in 2011, was the first woman to hold that job.

Read more
Freedom of Information
4:33 pm
Wed May 7, 2014

FOI Advocates Pleased With Legislature's Lack of Action

Jim Smith, president of the Connecticut Council on Freedom of Information.
Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

Efforts to change the state's laws regarding access to public information have apparently stalled. That comes as good news to those who advocate for freedom of information. 

Read more
Freedom of Information
9:17 am
Wed May 7, 2014

Company Says Health Care Exchange Contracts Are "Trade Secrets"

Stockbyte Thinkstock

The company that got the multimillion-dollar contract to run the call centers for the health care exchange Access Health CT -- called Maximus -- is refusing to release invoices and contracts to show exactly how much they are paid by the state. 

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
5:00 am
Wed May 7, 2014

The Murder of Joseph Smith

Joseph Smith Jr., Founder of the Latter Day Saint Movement.
Credit Unknown Painter / Wikimedia Commons

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, is the religious version of recession food. Since the end of the Civil War, the Mormon membership numbers have grown every single year, and quite often they've grown at an astonishing pace.  In the late 1970's and 80's, they added members at a rate of 5-6% a year. Today, their worldwide membership is around 15 million. 

Read more
Code Switch
3:45 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Can Student Journalists Ban 'Redskins' From Their School Paper?

This mural by the football field features Neshaminy's mascot.
Aaron Moselle NPR

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 10:34 am

"Redskins."

That word sits at the center of a controversy in suburban Philadelphia. It's pitted student journalists against school board members, but has left the school community largely shrugging its shoulders.

Student editors at Neshaminy High School in Bucks County have vowed not to print the word, which is the school's Native American mascot.

The Neshaminy School Board, however, is expected to vote later this month on a policy that would reverse the ban.

Read more
Technology
4:44 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

Drone Journalism Can't Fully Take Flight Until Regulators Act

Drone Journalism Lab researcher Ben Kreimer is limited to testing drones indoors.
Courtesy of Drone Journalism Lab

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 11:12 am

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
10:14 am
Mon May 5, 2014

The Scramble: David Folkenflik, Smart Guns, and Bearden

Rupert Murdoch at the Vanity Fair party celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Tribeca Film Festival
Credit David Shankbone / Wikimedia Commons

This hour on The Scramble our superguest is David Folkenflik. I don't have to tell you who David Folkenflik is, do I? I mean, you're public radio listeners. The superguest always sets the agenda, and David wants to talk about new journalism start-ups like Vox, Five-Thirty Eight, First Look,  and about what middle-aged digital brand names like Slate are doing to survive. 

Read more
Political Humor
2:45 am
Sun May 4, 2014

Obama Cracks Wise At White House Correspondents Dinner

Obama has two ferns brought to the podium as a spoof of his appearance on "Between Two Ferns" for his standup at the White House Correspondents' Association dinner.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 8:14 pm

President Obama made fun of himself at the White House Correspondents Association dinner on Saturday, the annual nerd-ball schmooze fest where Washington's media stars get comfy with a mix of political bigwigs and Hollywood beautiful people to celebrate a year of journalism.

Obama, known for his comic timing and delivery, didn't disappoint.

Read more
Where We Live
9:00 am
Thu May 1, 2014

John Dean and the Legacy of Watergate

The cover of TIME magazine in April 1973 illustrated by Jack Davis showed the men surrounding Richard Nixon, including John Dean.
TIME magazine

We’re live from the Hartford Hilton, part of InPractice, a conference put on by the Hartford County Bar Association. Their special guest is John Dean, former White House Counsel during the Nixon administration. Dean is credited with cooperating with investigators, and linking President Nixon to the Watergate scandal. He was also called, by the FBI, the “master manipulator of the cover up.”

Dean pleaded guilty to obstruction of justice, and spent four months in jail. He has faced decades of questions and criticism about his role. The story he’s here to tell lawyers is about the Legacy of Watergate, and what it means for today’s legal profession.

Read more
Media
6:45 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Hillary Clinton On Journalism: Less Advocacy, More Explanation Needed

Clinton spoke about the problems she sees with the news industry during her appearance at UConn.
Peter Morenus/UConn Photo

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton spoke at the University of Connecticut last week. The speech was closed to the public, but she took questions, including one from UConn President Susan Herbst exploring the current state of journalism.

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
6:00 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Salon.com's Editor-in-Chief Scrambles With Colin McEnroe

Credit Daniel Novta / Flickr Creative Commons

We cover a lot of ground on this hour's Scramble. We begin with the editor of Salon.com in a conversation about a story that dominated the headlines this weekend, the racist remarks attributed to Los Angeles Clippers owner, Donald Sterling.

Dave Daley sees Sterling and Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy as part of a pattern. I don't. Not exactly, anyway. Dave also talks about Thomas Piketty, the first rock star economist in, well, a really long time.

Read more
Sports Journalism
10:48 am
Thu April 24, 2014

Sports Reporting: The Way It Was ... And Is

Back in the day, people used to ask Frank Deford who he thought was the greatest boxer. Nowadays, nobody even asks about boxing.
Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 10:08 am

When I was a young, cocksure lad in this business, one thing I hated was for anyone in the Old Guard to preface an observation about sports by saying, "It used to be ... "

Invariably, the point was that it used to be better.

I promised myself that I'd never become a "used-to-be" guy. But for the benefit of today's young, cocksure lads in the business, here I go:

It used to be that people always asked me if athletes weren't making too much money. Nobody ever asks me that anymore. The only money issue I hear now is, "Why aren't college athletes paid?"

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
10:38 am
Wed April 23, 2014

The Scramble: Fact-Checking, the "Rape Scene" and the NYT Op-Ed Page

NYT columnist, Thomas Friedman
Credit Charles Haynes / Wikimedia Commons

The more I read about The Dallas Buyers Club, the less I like it, which is too bad because I really like that movie.

First, I read the that film's portrayal of Ron Woodruff, the hard-bitten homophobe who gradually softens is wrong. Woodruff was, according to friends and family, comfortably bisexual. He never had to go through the transition you see in the film.

Read more
Awards
3:24 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Pulitzer Prizes Are Out: 'Washington Post,' 'The Guardian' Win For NSA Stories

Journalists Laura Poitras and Glenn Greenwald helped The Guardian win a Pulitzer Prize for public service along with The Washington Post Monday, for their stories based on NSA documents provided by Edward Snowden.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 12:07 pm

Months after lifting a veil of secrecy from the National Security Agency's surveillance operations, The Washington Post and The Guardian won a Pulitzer Prize for public service Monday. The two papers broke the story in tandem, relying on NSA documents provided by Edward Snowden.

Read more
Rwandan Genocide
3:36 am
Thu April 10, 2014

A Reporter Reflects On Rwanda: 'It's Like A Madness Took Over'

NPR's Jackie Northam reporting from Rwanda during the country's genocide in 1994.
NPR

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 8:54 am

There was a thin mist in the early morning air when we set off for the Rwandan capital, Kigali, on April 11, 1994. The genocide had begun four days earlier.

There were no flights into the country, so I and three fellow journalists crossed into Rwanda from neighboring Burundi, hitching a ride with a French priest who was shuttling Tutsi nuns out of the country. He took us to the town of Butare, where a Belgian inn keeper rented us an old cream-colored Renault and drew us a map of how to get to Kigali.

Read more
Where We Live
9:00 am
Fri March 14, 2014

Celebrating The Hartford Courant's 250th Year

This year, The Hartford Courant celebrates its 250th year of publication.
Credit NS Newsflash / Creative Commons

For centuries, Connecticut has housed one of American journalism’s greatest gems: The Hartford Courant. In 1764, a New Haven printer by the name of Thomas Green founded the capital-based newspaper. Since then, The Courant has evolved into an established and highly revered news enterprise, circulating well over 100,000 copies to readers each day.

Now, thanks to years of professional writing and reporting, The Courant is celebrating its 250th year of publication, thus maintaining its status as the nation’s oldest continuously-running newspaper. 

Read more
Where We Live
9:00 am
Fri March 7, 2014

Mental Illness, Jayson Blair, and Women Composers

The Women Composers Festival of Hartford celebrates its 14th year at Hartford's Charter Oak Cultural Center.
Credit shadowslicer1 / Creative Commons

Life with bipolar disorder is not easy for anyone. For a prominent psychiatrist, it has provided a very important window into how to treat others. Dr. Kay Redfield Jamison from Johns Hopkins University joins us, author of the bestselling memoir about living with bipolar disorder, An Unquiet Mind. We talk to her in advance of her appearance at Friday night's Connecticut Forum.

Read more
Covering Sports
11:09 am
Fri February 28, 2014

More Women Are Athletes, But Sports Reporters Are Still Mostly Men

Credit Jim Larrison / Creative Commons

Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972  gave women the same rights to educational opportunities as men at every level of schooling.

While the law says that schools must give equal consideration to men and women when deciding who gets admitted to a school, who gets financial aid, and where a student lives while at school, the clause allowing women entrance to sports has long overshadowed the rest. 

Read more
Host's Diary
9:12 am
Fri February 28, 2014

A Judge, Rendered Homicidal by Grammar

Credit GiantsFanatic / Creative Commons

The Colin McEnroe Show is featuring an episode on grammar next Tuesday. 

Below we have a "fatal" example of a misplaced modifier. I'm fairly certain the judge didn't do any of those horrible things. (h/t R.R. Cooper)

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
10:01 am
Tue February 25, 2014

Women Speak Out on the State of Sports

Meg Greenwell is a senior editor for features at ESPN the Magazine
Chion Wolf

Four women join us to talk about sports, mostly football. Two of them are sports journalists. A third is a journalist specializing in legal issues, and a fourth is a scientist and engineer.

Read more
Egypt
12:37 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

3 Al-Jazeera Journalists In Egypt Plead Not Guilty To Terrorist Links

Journalists hold placards as they demonstrate across the street from Egypt's embassy in central London, on Wednesday.
Lefteris Pitarakis AP

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 2:44 pm

Three journalists working for Qatar-based network Al-Jazeera English who are on trial in Egypt for their alleged links to the Muslim Brotherhood have pleaded not guilty on Thursday. The trio were denied bail and their trial was adjourned until March 5.

Australian Peter Greste, Mohamed Fahmy and Baher Mohammed, wearing white prison outfits, appeared in metal cages, according to Reuters, which says several others identified as al-Jazeera journalists are being tried in absentia.

Read more

Pages