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Pete Birkinshaw / flickr creative commons

This week in pop culture: Delta and Bank of America decide Shakespeare is in poor taste. Megan Kelly decides Alex Jones is worthy of a platform. Senators John McCain and Richard Burr decide that Senator Kamala Harris shouldn't get to finish her sentences. And Bob Dylan decides to troll the Nobel committees.

Jason Cisneroz, a community service officer in Houston, is troubled. His job in the nation's fourth largest city is to forge good relations between the police and Hispanic immigrants, a population typically wary of blue uniforms.

"A couple of days ago there was a witness to a burglary of a motor vehicle," he said. "She saw the suspects run to a certain place and with items they stole from a car, but she was afraid to come to police, she was in fear they would ask for her papers."

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

I’ve been in Senegal over the last several days to follow the work being done to expand community radio into an important rural part of the country called Tambacounda. 

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

Dakar is the capital of Senegal, and is truly its center. The city continues to grow with more than two million residents. An interesting fact: half of the country’s population is 18 and under. 

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

Bonjour! I’ve taken a few days away from hosting WNPR's Where We Live to report from Senegal, on the west coast of Africa. I'm following the work of a Connecticut-based non-profit, Le Korsa, which is working with local groups in Senegal to help rural villages open their own community radio stations.

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