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Connecticut saw jobs growth slow significantly in July, according to the latest figures from the state Department of Labor. Preliminary monthly totals show the state lost 600 jobs in July, and its unemployment rate remained unchanged at five percent. 

The U.S. economy created an estimated 209,000 jobs in July, representing a modest slowdown from the previous month but coming in better than many economists had expected. The unemployment rate ticked down to 4.3 percent from 4.4 percent.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics said in its monthly report that, statistically, July showed little change from previous months, as the number of unemployed persons remained around 7 million.

Americans have been waiting for a solid pay raise for years. Maybe there's good news awaiting them as the country employs more people.

The U.S. economic recovery has gone on for eight long years, and the unemployment rate is at a low 4.4 percent. But wage gains have barely budged.

That's got economists scratching their heads.

Boston Globe CEO Doug Franklin resigned Tuesday, after less than seven months in the role.

In a memo to staff, Franklin cited “differences” over strategy with John Henry, the owner and publisher of the newspaper.

“While John Henry and I share similar passion and vision for the Globe, we have our differences how to strategically achieve our financial sustainability,” Franklin said in his memo. “With disappointment, I am resigning from the Globe, effective immediately, and will not be part of your work shaping the Globe’s future.”

A new study demonstrates a key role immigrants fill in the American economy. The study, by the bipartisan research and advocacy group New American Economy, shows immigrants are more likely than U.S.-born workers to pick up night and weekend shifts in a number of fields.

State legislatures and city halls are battling over who gets to set the minimum wage, and increasingly, the states are winning.

After dozens of city and county governments voted to raise their local minimum wage ordinances in the last several years, states have been responding by passing laws requiring cities to abide by statewide minimums. So far, 27 states have passed such laws.

Micromanagement is routinely the top complaint people have about their bosses, and in today's good job market where workers have more options, that's a bigger problem for employers.

People might have their own definition of when a manager crosses into being too controlling, but most people would probably agree that Marjon Bell's former boss would fit.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk, speaking to U.S. governors this weekend, told the political leaders that artificial intelligence poses an "existential threat" to human civilization.

At the bipartisan National Governors Association in Rhode Island, Musk also spoke about energy sources, his own electric car company and space travel. But when Gov. Brian Sandoval of Nevada, grinning, asked if robots will take everyone's jobs in the future — Musk wasn't joking when he responded.

Yes, "robots will do everything better than us," Musk said. But he's worried about more than the job market.

City of Stamford

Job search website Indeed says it will create more jobs in Stamford, adding 500 positions to its current workforce of 700 and making an investment of $26.5 million in its offices. 

Multiculturalism / Creative Commons

Race is a myth; racism is not. I'm stealing this line from Gene Seymour, one of our guests on our show today. 

kaboompics.com

Efforts on the state level to introduce paid family leave are critical to overcoming gender equity problems in the workforce, according to advocates.

An estimated 222,000 jobs were added to the U.S. economy in June, according to the monthly employment report released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics Friday.

"The job gains were better than expected — most economists had predicted a gain of 180,000 jobs," NPR's Chris Arnold reports for our Newscast unit.

The unemployment rate rose slightly to 4.4 percent from 4.3 percent — a 16-year low that was hit in May.

Why can't kids today just work their way through college the way earlier generations did?

The answer to that question isn't psychology. It's math. A summer job just doesn't have the purchasing power it used to, especially when you compare it with the cost of college.

Let's take the example of a working-class student at a four-year public university who's getting no help from Mom and Dad. In 1981-'82, the average full cost to attend was $2,870. That's for tuition, fees and room and board.

Aetna

Aetna has announced it will move its headquarters to Manhattan, relocating its top executives out of Hartford for the first time since its founding in the city in 1853. The shift will come in late 2018. 

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Yale New Haven Health has announced plans to create forty new jobs in New London as it consolidates its affiliation with the city’s Lawrence and Memorial Hospital. 

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