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The long and growing list of high-profile men losing their jobs amid sexual-harassment allegations speaks to a big cultural sea change. But is that shift driven by generational differences in how sexual harassment is viewed, or by bigger changes in the workplace?

Seattle executive consultant Kim Arellano has taught classes on generational differences, and says sexual harassment makes for the liveliest discussions.

Discrimination in the form of sexual harassment has been in the headlines for weeks now, but new poll results being released by NPR show that other forms of discrimination against women are also pervasive in American society. The poll is a collaboration with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

For example, a majority (56 percent) of women believe that where they live, women are paid less than men for equal work. And roughly a third (31 percent) say they've been discriminated against when applying for jobs because they are women.

Carmen Baskauf / WNPR

It started as a hashtag and has grown into a cultural moment.

The Trump administration has been eliminating some protections that allow more than 300,000 people to live and work in the U.S. under what is known as temporary protected status. Many could face deportation when their status expires.

An estimated 50,000 of them work in the construction industry, concentrated in areas like Texas, Florida and California that are recovering from hurricanes and wildfires and where labor shortages in construction are especially acute.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It’s been a hectic few weeks on Capitol Hill, but the Thanksgiving recess means a bit of rest for lawmakers and a chance for us to check in with a member of the Connecticut delegation.

Mark Moz / Flickr

Across the country, teachers are being shut out of some housing markets due to their low wages. That's according to a report by the National Council on Teacher Quality. But the outlook in Connecticut is a little better.

Last week, state lawmakers decided to allow some people with criminal records to work in casinos. The head of MGM Springfield said the company is "very excited" by the change. 

Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development

Connecticut officials have unveiled their pitch to bring Amazon's new $5 billion headquarters to the Nutmeg State.

On a wall in Greg LeRoy's office is a frame with a custom-engraved wrench and a photo of workers in front of the Diamond Tool and Horseshoe factory in Duluth, Minn. It's from his days helping unions fight plant closings — when he first started digging into the convoluted financial relationship of corporations and local governments.

These days, LeRoy is the guy to call if you want to know about corporate subsidies. Lately, his phone has been ringing about one company in particular: Amazon.

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

On Thursday morning, Mayor Luke Bronin stood at a podium that sat on a bed of mulch. He was in a city park to talk about how $2.5 million raised in private funds will push his Youth Service Corps program into year two.

Nathan & Jenny / Creative Commons

The state’s largest health insurer, Anthem is still in dispute with Hartford HealthCare over reimbursement for health services, but another insurer has reached a contract with the hospital system. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Residents of East Windsor have struck down a measure that would put an annual payment of $3 million from the Mashantucket and Mohegan tribes into a reserve fund. The money is being paid to mitigate the effects of visitors coming into town for a casino the tribes plan to build. 

Juhan Sonin/flickr creative commons

Hundreds of jobs for young people were not available this summer, as the state failed to pass a budget in time to fund its Summer Youth Employment Program. But some local organizations stepped up to make some of those jobs available.

The early feedback for Hillary Clinton's new book What Happened is rolling in. Sarah Huckabee Sanders said it's "sad," and Bernie Sanders is understanding about her criticisms towards him.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Alexion Pharmaceuticals plans to move its headquarters out of the city of New Haven where it began as a startup. The giant company will relocate its corporate office to Boston, the third major company to announce a move from the state in the last two years, following General Electric and Aetna.

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