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insurance

After years of waiting, it's finally here.

Mary Anne Williams

Homeowners whose foundations are crumbling because of faulty concrete pleaded with lawmakers Tuesday for help.

Back in the day, people paid for routine, primary medical care on their own and used insurance only when something serious came up. Some primary care doctors are betting that model can thrive again through a monthly subscription for routine care and a high-deductible insurance policy to take care of the big stuff.

But the changes raise questions about whether that approach really leads to more effective and efficient health care.

Spotmatik/iStock / Thinkstock

A new report from C-HIT -- the Connecticut Health Investigative Team -- looks at how emergency rooms across the state are grappling with a rising number of child mental health patients. The number is still mounting, it says, despite efforts to confront the issue by Governor Malloy and other officials. 

No matter where you stand on the political spectrum, health care under the Affordable Care Act is going to change in the next few years. The Republican-led Congress has vowed to "repeal and replace" the health law known as Obamacare.

That has left many people anxious and confused about what will happen and when. So NPR's Morning Edition asked listeners to post questions on Twitter and Facebook, and we will be answering some of them here and on the radio in the weeks ahead.

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