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We spend over three trillion dollars on health care every year and we have worse outcomes than any other developed country - all of which spend on average about half of what America spends per person. 

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Customers on Connecticut’s health care exchange will be facing double digit rate increases next year, but the state’s insurance commissioner said Wednesday she’s hopeful there might be some relief in sight. 

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Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal stood beside Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders and 15 others Wednesday in Washington D.C. as Sanders introduced his “Medicare For All” bill.

Courtesy of Access Health CT

Connecticut’s health care exchange will once again have two insurers offering plans next year, a welcome relief for Access Health Connecticut, which has been on shifting sands since the election of Donald Trump as president. 

Staff Sgt. Daniel J. Martinez / Air National Guard

Insurance companies are still in the midst of settling claims from Hurricane Harvey. Now they must prepare for possibly an even bigger impact from Irma. 

Randy Bresnik / NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Insurers are among those deploying teams to communities affected by Hurricane Harvey. Travelers, which has its property casualty lines based in Hartford, has dispatched three mobile claims centers to the state. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Health insurer Aetna has admitted it inadvertently revealed the HIV status of some of its customers in a paper mailing last month. 

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Hartford has long been known as the insurance capital of the world, but will that change now that insurance giant, Aetna, is moving its headquarters out of the state?

This hour, we examine the past and future of insurance in Connecticut — and beyond.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini has a message for Washington, as the uncertainty over health care reform continues. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The U.S Senate recently rejected a number of Republican plans to repeal, replace, or just overhaul the Affordable Care Act. But the health care debate is far from settled.

Senate Republicans don't appear to be too worried about President Trump's latest round of threats.

Updated 4:21 p.m. ET Aug. 1

Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., announced today that the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions committee will hold bipartisan hearings on ways to stabilize the Affordable Care Act marketplaces for 2018.

The hearings will start the week of Sept. 4. Their aim is to act by Sept. 27, when insurers must sign contracts to sell individual insurance plans on HealthCare.gov for 2018.

In a moment of unexpected high drama, Republicans were stymied once again in their effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act — and they have John McCain to thank for it.

In the early morning hours Friday, the senator showed why he earned the nickname "Maverick" over his long tenure.

Betting that thin is in — and might be the only way forward — Senate Republicans are eyeing a "skinny repeal" that would roll back an unpopular portion of the federal health law. But health policy analysts warn that the idea has been tried before, and with little success.

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Republicans in Washington finally got closer to the goal they’ve had for about seven years - the repeal and replacement of Obamacare. Well, at least the repeal part.

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