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America’s national parks are experiencing record crowds — and some nature enthusiasts worry about what that means for the protected land. Is the sheer amount of people taking away the rustic experience these parks offer? 

James L. Occi / Armed Forces Pest Management Board

Incidents of tick-borne diseases are on the rise throughout Connecticut and other parts of the country, especially in the Northeast. Researchers are also reporting an increase in the overall number of ticks.

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With the zucchinis coming on hot and heavy and winter squash not far behind, you might welcome some insects that prey on these cucurbits. But while squash can be overly abundant, I'd never wish squash bugs or squash vine borers on any gardener.

This summer, scientists in California are releasing 20 million mosquitoes in an effort to shrink the population of mosquitoes that can carry diseases.

It sounds counterintuitive. But the plan is to release millions of sterile male mosquitoes, which will then mate with wild female mosquitoes. The eggs the females lay won't hatch, researchers say.

Experts have predicted a higher than usual number of ticks this year. That could mean increased risk of Lyme disease, but not all ticks carry the infection. If you’ve found a tick recently, the University of Rhode Island has an easy way to identify it, and determine whether it might be dangerous. 

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

Summer is officially here! And it looks like it's going to be a hot one.

This hour, we find out what opportunities -- and challenges -- lie ahead for Connecticut’s garden lovers. We check in with gardening expert Charlie Nardozzi, and we want to hear from you. 

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Honey bees have been having a tough time lately. Pests and disease have plagued many hives, killing off the pollinators and forcing people looking to save the bees to get creative.

NY State IPM Program at Cornell University / Creative Commons

The tick population in Connecticut is on the rise, and so is the threat of Lyme disease — and other tick-borne illnesses.

This hour, we hear the latest from medical professionals and policy makers about the need for new funding and research to battle a “growing tick problem” in the Northeast.

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

Summer *officially* kicks off next week -- and if recent temperatures are any indication of what's to come, then it's going to be a hot one.

This hour, we find out what opportunities -- and challenges -- lie ahead for Connecticut’s garden lovers. We check in with gardening expert Charlie Nardozzi, and we want to hear from you. 

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Connecticut’s top insect expert is banking on more rain, and a fungus, to knock back populations of gypsy moths. For the past two years, those hungry pests have plagued Connecticut’s trees.

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Officials say Connecticut is experiencing an "extraordinary" season for ticks. Nearly 40 percent of more than 1,000 ticks tested so far were positive for the bacteria causing Lyme disease.

NY State IPM Program at Cornell University / Creative Commons

The tick population in Connecticut is on the rise, and so is the threat of Lyme disease — and other tick-borne illnesses.

This hour, we hear the latest from medical professionals and policy makers about the need for new funding and research to battle a “growing tick problem” in the Northeast.

Scott Bauer / U.S. Department of Agriculture

The tick population and tick-borne diseases are steadily increasing in Connecticut and throughout the Northeast according to scientists. In response, Senator Richard Blumenthal announced a federal grant to enhance research efforts into mosquito and tick-borne diseases.

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Gypsy moths have been with Nutmeggers for a while. The pest was first detected in Stonington in 1905, and by the mid-20th century, spread statewide. The pests hurt trees, annoy homeowners, and in recent years -- have been growing in number. 

Last summer Felicia Keesing returned from a long trip and found that her home in upstate New York had been subjected to an invasion.

"There was evidence of mice everywhere. They had completely taken over," says Keesing, an ecologist at Bard College.

It was a plague of mice. And it had landed right in Keesing's kitchen.

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