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Harriet Jones / WNPR

Fairfield University said it will partner to redevelop the headquarters campus that General Electric is leaving in the town.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Hartford resident Tenaya Taylor, 25, became a bike commuter last summer. She’s a college student and works a few different jobs around the city. The bus schedule can be unreliable sometimes, she said, so biking for her is the fastest way to get around. 

Gov. Dannel Malloy/flickr creative commons

This week’s opening in New Haven of Alexion Pharmaceutical's new global headquarters marks the completion of the first phase of the city’s revitalization effort.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

For Nutmeggers who drive to work on the state’s jam-packed highways or pile into Metro-North trains during the morning rush, the thought of commuting by sea might seem like a tranquil alternative -- but not necessarily a realistic transit option.

Eduardo Mueses / Creative Commons

Ten Connecticut towns and three transit districts across the state are receiving $20 million in federal highway funds for transportation projects centered on improving traffic flow and air quality

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy seems to be at odds with his transportation commissioner over the issue of congestion pricing. It’s a way to discourage drivers from using highways, but its place in the state’s comprehensive transportation plan is uncertain.

Keoni Cabral / Creative Commons

Residents opposed to a new Niagara water bottling facility in Bloomfield are holding a public meeting Thursday. They say the company and the town chose to keep the public out of the loop until it was too late. And they say public records back that up. 

Kat Northern Lights Man / Creative Commons

If you’re at a crosswalk, do you wait for the walk signal to cross to the other side? Or do you just cross when there's no oncoming traffic? What if you’re with other people, or children? 

That’s what researchers at the University of Connecticut and Manchester Community College are asking in a survey they hope to circulate online. 

Chup Yip So via flickr.com / Creative Commons

Governor Dannel Malloy announced this week that 15 Connecticut towns will receive funding through the state’s Small Town Economic Assistance Program (STEAP).

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Hartford school officials have decided to tear down Clark Elementary School because of extensive PCB contamination. The district had planned on renovating the school, but after discovering the extent of the problem, that option has been taken off the table.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

    

The Isham-Terry house, a lone Italianate villa, sits on a corner in Hartford within view of drivers headed eastbound on I-84. 

The house is the last of what was once an affluent neighborhood -- and it survived, though not without a fight, the construction of I-84 in the 1960s, one of the few historical buildings to avoid the wrecking balls of Hartford’s urban renewal projects. 

Additional hearings have been scheduled to review the latest plans for the $950 million MGM Springfield casino. 

The Springfield City Council, which has already held four hearings on the site plan for the resort casino, has scheduled two additional hearings later this month. 

City Council President Mike Fenton said he’s been assured by MGM officials that the extended review will not hold up the construction of the casino which is scheduled to open in 2018.

Freewayjim / YouTube

Governor Dannel Malloy’s transportation goals for the state include a plan to widen the entire length of I-95 in Connecticut. The state’s transportation commissioner said on WNPR Friday that the widening plan is actually tied to congestion pricing to discourage highway use.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

More trains! Wider roads! Fixed bridges! The governor’s big plan to fix our transportation system has a lot in it but the state is still figuring out how to pay for it. Department of Transportation Commissioner James Redeker stops by for an update on the state of Connecticut’s current transportation infrastructure and plans to overhaul the system.

Thanks in part to the mild snow-free winter so far, the reconstruction of Interstate 91 through downtown Springfield is ahead of schedule.

   MassDOT CEO Stephanie Pollack said the contractor on the $185 million project appears to be on track to earn a $9 million bonus by completing the work by the end of 2017.

"Between the mild winter and those rewards the contractor has every incentive to bring the project in ahead of schedule and it is my understanding that may well happen," Pollack told reporters in Springfield Wednesday.

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