income

Harriet Jones

The Connecticut Low Wage Employer Advisory Board is holding its third hearing on Wednesday in Bridgeport. 

President Obama on Monday called on Congress to revisit the controversial idea of providing a government-run insurance plan as part of the offerings under the Affordable Care Act.

What's been described as the "public option" was jettisoned from the health law in 2009 by a handful of conservative Democrats in the Senate. Every Democrat's vote was needed to pass the bill in the face of unanimous Republican opposition.

Washington, D.C., will be the next major city to implement a $15 minimum wage rate following a unanimous vote Tuesday by its city council.

In a victory for local and national labor unions, Washington joins the ranks of cities such as San Francisco, Los Angeles and Seattle in raising wages for primarily lower-income workers in restaurants, retail and other service industries.

The District's current hourly minimum wage is $10.50, and it was scheduled to go up to $11.50 next month under a law enacted in 2014.

Millions more American workers will soon be eligible for overtime pay under a rule being finalized Wednesday by the Labor Department.

The rule says anyone who makes less than $47,476 per year must receive time-and-a-half pay for hours worked beyond 40 hours a week. That's roughly double the current threshold of $23,660.

The measure is one of the most sweeping moves the Obama administration has made so far in its efforts to boost slow-growing incomes. But it's sure to face opposition from some business owners.

The Senate unexpectedly found itself debating the minimum wage on Thursday night. The effort to raise the wage to $12.00 an hour by 2020 was introduced as an amendment on a different bill. 

It was 1993 when Massachusetts Gov. William Weld declared: "A good education in a safe environment is the magic wand that brings opportunity." The Republican was signing into law a landmark overhaul of the state's school funding system. "It's up to us to make sure that wand is waved over every cradle," he added.

With that, Massachusetts poured state money into districts that educated lots of low-income kids, many of which also struggled to raise funds through local property taxes.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Tax liens might not sound like the "sexiest" topic. But for some property owners, they can mean the difference between keeping or losing a home.

This hour, we take a look at how these liens -- and, more specifically, the sales of these liens -- are affecting some of Connecticut’s most financially vulnerable residents. It’s the latest in our ongoing series with WNPR contributor Susan Campbell. 

Harriet Jones

Hundreds of workers in Hartford are expected to go on strike Thursday in the long-running campaign to raise the minimum wage. The one-day stoppage once again calls for $15.00 an hour.

A New Hampshire-based bakery chain is showing its support for Equal Pay Day Tuesday by giving female customers a break on their bills.

Women who visit The Works bakery locations in Concord, Keene, Portsmouth and Durham today will be charged only 79 percent of their bills.

Men will still have to pay full price.

That’s meant to highlight the oft-cited statistic of women earning 79 cents on the dollar compared to their male counterparts.

Poor people who reside in expensive, well-educated cities such as San Francisco tend to live longer than low-income people in less affluent places, according to a study of more than a billion Social Security and tax records.

Five star players from the U.S. women's national soccer team have filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, saying that the U.S. Soccer Federation pays the reigning World Cup champions far less than their male counterparts.

Every morning for weeks, Meagen Limes made the same phone call: to a court in Washington, D.C., to see if that day was the day she'd be evicted from her home.

Limes faced eviction because she couldn't pay rent on her three-bedroom apartment in Southeast Washington, where many of the city's poorest residents live.

It can sometimes take weeks before the marshals actually show up at your door, and Limes fully expected to be homeless any day.

DC Central Kitchen / Creative Commons

They say it's important to eat breakfast every day. But what if you eat two breakfasts?

According to a new study, students who eat two breakfasts -- one at home and one at school -- are less likely to experience unhealthy weight gain than students who skip the meal altogether

Kelly Henderson loves her job, teaching at Newton South High School in a suburb west of Boston. But she's frustrated she can't afford to live in the community where she teaches: It's part of the 10th most expensive housing market in the nation.

"For people in the private sector, they're probably saying 'Oh poor you, you can't live in the community where you work, what's the big deal?' " says Henderson, 35. "And I guess part of the nature of public education and why it's a different kind of job, is that it's all-consuming — as it should be."

Keoni Cabral / Creative Commons

The Michigan Civil Rights Commission announced it will hold hearings to see whether discrimination played a role in the handling of Flint’s water crisis. The decision came early last week, amid allegations of environmental racism against the city’s largely black community.

This hour -- from Flint, Michigan to New Haven, Connecticut -- we learn about the environmental justice issues affecting America's low-income communities of color. 

One month down, two to go.

For unemployed adults in 22 states, that's how long they can count on help with the grocery bills: Starting this January, they have three months to find a job or lose their food assistance.

SNAP benefits — formerly known as food stamps — have been tied to employment for two decades. Unless they are caring for children or unable to work, adults need to have a job to receive more than three months of benefits.

University of Connecticut

A  new study shows few low-income Connecticut students earn bachelor degrees within six years of transferring from a community college. 

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Hartford city Treasurer Adam Cloud said he will give back a $20,000 raise that neither the mayor nor the city council remembers approving.

Doug Kerr / Creative Commons

Just over half of renters in the U.S. are older than 40, a new study released on Wednesday found. The change comes in the wake of volatile housing issues in the last several years.

Jessica Hill / AP Photo

The 2011 consolidation of Connecticut’s regional and community colleges hasn’t worked out so well. Administrative costs have gone up, it’s still hard for students to transfer credits from community to four-year colleges, and the system faces budget deficits that will require painful cuts. But a new proposal calling for give backs from employees has unleashed a furious backlash. 

glegorly/iStock / Thinkstock

A children's advocacy group said in a new report that many people of color and young workers in Connecticut have been left behind in the economic recovery from the Great Recession that ended in 2009.

Tax Credits / Flickr Creative Commons

Are you wondering whether to buy or rent a home? Or how much to save for your child’s education? How much should you set aside for retirement, depending on your age? 

myfuturedotcom / Creative Commons

Union leaders said they've reached a tentative deal that will stop a threatened strike at 20 Connecticut nursing homes and provide a $15 per hour minimum wage to certified nursing assistants. 

JECO Photo / Creative Commons

Across the U.S., low-income, first-generation college students are not graduating at the same rate as some of their wealthier peers. 

Matthew / Flickr Creative Commons

Across America, low-income, first generation college students are not graduating at the same rate as some of their wealthier peers. Coming up, we take a closer look at this trend with WAMU reporter Kavitha Cardoza. Her documentary is called “Lower Income, Higher Ed."  

Connecticut Commission on Children / cga.ct.gov

Connecticut was the first state in the nation to pass a law in 2014 that aims to help get kids ready for school by also focusing on their parents.

Tax Credits / Creative Commons

Are you wondering whether to buy or rent a home? Or how much to save for your child’s education? How much should you set aside for retirement, depending on your age? 

In America's fine-dining restaurants, how much workers get paid is closely correlated to the color of their skin.

Matthew / Creative Commons

Across America, low-income, first generation college students are not graduating at the same rate as some of their wealthier peers. Coming up, we take a closer look at this trend with WAMU reporter Kavitha Cardoza. Her documentary is called “Lower Income, Higher Ed."  

Report Warns Of Boston's High Inequality

Sep 23, 2015

Income inequality in Boston has widened considerably over the last dozen or so years, a new report from The Boston Foundation details.

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