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immigration

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

More than a hundred people gathered on the campus of Eastern Connecticut State University Tuesday to protest President Trump’s decision to end protections for undocumented young people. 

Updated at 3:57 p.m. ET

The Trump administration Tuesday formally announced it will end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program — also called DACA — putting an expiration date on the legal protections granted to roughly 800,000 people known as "DREAMers," who entered the country illegally as children.

President Trump issued a statement, saying, "I do not favor punishing children, most of whom are now adults, for the actions of their parents. But we must also recognize that we are nation of opportunity because we are a nation of laws."

Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

The White House will announce its decision about DACA, an Obama-era immigration policy, on Tuesday, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said. President Trump had earlier said the announcement could come at some point over the weekend.

As a presidential candidate, Trump pledged to "immediately terminate" DACA, the program that former President Barack Obama began five years ago to protect immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

But once in the White House, Trump took a softer stance.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

The U.S. Secretary of Agriculture said Thursday he hopes progress towards immigration reforms around farm labor could lead to a more comprehensive immigration policy fix. Sonny Perdue was speaking during a forum with Connecticut farmers. 

CT-N

People who benefit from the DACA program in Connecticut spoke out Wednesday about rumors that the Trump administration may end protection for undocumented residents who arrived as children. 

Gage Skidmore, Peoria Arizona / Wikimedia Commons

President Trump pardoned former Maricopa County sheriff Joe Arpaio Friday. Arpaio was not going to jail for his documented brutality against immigrants, failure to investigate complaints of sexual assault, or his  arrest of journalists critical of his policies. He was going to jail for repeated contempt of a judicial order to stop illegally detaining immigrants. Arpaio and our president seem to both hold contempt for the laws they were elected to uphold. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

New Fairfield resident Joel Colindres said he’s grateful to have been given a temporary stay from deportation by immigration officials.

“I just want nobody in the world to go through this. The pain that we’ve been having all this time -- it’s very hard,” Colindres said at a press conference Friday.

On Thursday, a federal judge granted Colindres the stay only 90 minutes before his plane was scheduled to take off for his native country of Guatemala.

Wikimedia Commons

Native Americans have been getting forced off their land for a long time. Thomas Jefferson forced them from their ancestral home in 1804 after he signed the Louisiana Purchase and promised they shall know the United States as only "friends and benefactors." 

More than 200 people of different faiths gathered at St. Jerome Catholic Church in Norwalk on Monday night to support Jung Courville and her family. She’s a mother of two U.S.-born boys and is facing deportation to South Korea.  

In Connecticut, a father of two U.S.-born children faces deportation to Guatemala in 10 days.

Chicago's Mayor Rahm Emanuel is pushing back against the federal government.

On Monday, the city is filing suit against the Department of Justice, which announced it would withhold millions of dollars in police grant money from so-called sanctuary cities.

Emanuel is suing because he says new rules for a federal crime-fighting grant go against the Constitution and the city's values.

"Chicago will not let our police officers become political pawns in a debate," Emanuel said.

Quebec continues to be inundated with asylum-seekers fleeing the U.S. to reach Canada. In order to house the influx of people, the government has opened the Olympic Stadium in Montreal.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A New Fairfield man ordered to be deported to his native Guatemala says he could be at risk of violence or kidnapping if he returns. Joel Colindres came to the United States illegally in 2004. He married a U.S. citizen in 2010 and they have two young children.

A week ago, Immigration and Customs Enforcement said Nury Chavarria had to board a flight to her native Guatemala. The mother of 4 U.S.-born children sought sanctuary at a New Haven church instead. Now Chavarria can leave the church basement and return home to her kids, while federal immigration court considers reopening her case.

Nury Chavarria, the Connecticut mother who sought sanctuary from deportation at Iglesia De Dios Pentecostal Church in New Haven, can return home to her four U.S.-born children. An immigration court in Hartford granted Chavarria motion for an emergency stay on Wednesday.

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