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immigration

Keith Allison flickr.com/photos/keithallison / Creatiive Commons

Attorney General Jeff Sessions recently urged cities, counties, and states to honor federal immigration detainer requests, saying if they don’t, they could lose federal money. Specifically, if an immigrant here illegally is arrested, he wants local law enforcement to continue to hold onto that person until federal immigration officials can pick them up.

But Connecticut officials say it’s not that easy -- and it may not be lawful. 

Anti-Muslim Graffiti Found at USM’s Portland Campus

Apr 6, 2017

PORTLAND, Maine — For the second time in recent months, police at the University of Southern Maine’s Portland campus are investigating anti-Muslim graffiti.

The phrase “Kill the Muslin” [sic] was found on Tuesday night written on a poster instructing people on what to do in the case of an active shooter, said USM spokesman Robert Stein. The phrase was written around an image of someone hitting a gunman with a chair beneath the header “Fight,” Stein said.

Massachusetts Man Among Those Arrested By ICE While Pursuing Residency

Apr 6, 2017

Leandro Arriaga is a construction worker, a property owner and the father of four children. He’s also been living in the United States without authorization since 2001. His wife, Katherine Ramos, is a naturalized U.S. citizen and said her husband wanted to change his legal status. That’s what ultimately got him arrested last week by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials.

Olgierd Rudak flickr.com/photos/olgierd / Creative Commons

Connecticut is rapidly emerging as one of the most progressive states in the nation on the issue of protecting its undocumented population. Governor Dannel Malloy has made a point of saying state law enforcement will not do the job of immigration agents in Connecticut. But there’s a seeming disconnect in one part of the state’s policy that has immigrants rights groups concerned. 

Researchers at Stanford University this week published a study that may bolster the argument that policies aimed at encouraging immigrants to come out of the shadows actually improve public safety. They found that a 2013 California law granting driver's licenses to immigrants in the country illegally reduced hit-and-run accidents by 7 to 10 percent in 2015, meaning roughly 4,000 fewer hit-and-runs. In that same year, 600,000 people got driver's licenses under the law.

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