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immigration

In the U.S., protests, confusion and anger have followed President Trump’s executive order that prevents new refugees from entering the country for 120 days, suspends resettlement for Syrians indefinitely and bars travelers from seven predominantly Muslim countries for 90 days.

A Stony Brook doctoral student has been released after being detained at John F. Kennedy Airport following President Trump’s executive order barring citizens from certain Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States.

Connecticut U.S. Senator Chris Murphy introduced a bill on Monday to overturn President Trump’s executive order on immigration.

For people working to bring Syrian refugees to the United States, President Trump’s executive order is throwing those plans into chaos.

Saira Rafiee boarded a plane in Tehran this weekend on her way to New York. She had been visiting family in Iran and needed to get back to the U.S. in time for classes at City University of New York's Graduate Center, where she is a Ph.D. student in political science. But, as a result of President Trump's executive order restricting the travel of citizens from seven majority-Muslim countries, including Iran, Rafiee says she was detained in Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates and, after nearly 18 hours, sent back to Tehran.

Refugee advocates and resettlement groups spent a chaotic weekend struggling to adapt on the fly, with families in the air and no official guidance on President Trump's executive order that bans refugees from around the world.

"There's no way to get guidance, nothing is coming down from the top. It was chaos at the airports," says Melanie Nezer, the vice president of policy and advocacy of HIAS, a global Jewish nonprofit that protects and resettles refugees. Her group tried to intervene in individual cases over the weekend.

Mike MaGuire / Creative Commons

President Donald Trump issued an executive order Friday indefinitely barring Syrian refugees from entering the United States. He also suspended all refugee admissions for 120 days, and blocked citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries - Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Yemen - from entering the country for 90 days. Chaos ensued, lawsuits were filed, and people protested nationwide against Trump for the second time since his Inauguration. 

Hours after two Iraqi men with U.S. visas were detained at John F. Kennedy Airport on Friday night, students at Yale Law School got to work to stop their deportation.

State Representative Edwin Vargas, a Hartford Democrat, has filed a bill that would make Connecticut a “sanctuary state.”

Tim Pierce / Creative Commons

It’s morning on the East Coast, but it’s late afternoon in Iran, and Mohsen Hosseini is en route to the airport for a flight to the United States — or so he hopes. 

New York Andrew Governor Cuomo is offering his top attorneys to help defend detainees and their families affected by President Donald Trump’s executive order banning immigrants, in the midst of second day of protests across the nation, including at New York’s JFK airport.

Mike Maguire / Creative Commons

President Donald Trump’s executive order blocking refugees and banning citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries from the United States has ignited protests around the country.

This hour, we get reactions from Connecticut and learn how the travel ban could impact some of our residents.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Plans for at least a dozen refugee families scheduled to arrive in New Haven in the next few weeks have been thrown into question after President Donald Trump announced his new executive order on immigration. 

President Donald Trump has signed executive orders this week that look to bolster Immigration and Customs Enforcement – the department that leads deportations. Itzel Cabrera of New Haven is worried her family will be separated.

President Trump's executive order on immigration late Friday ignited nationwide protests — and a slew of legal challenges.

At least four federal judges across the country have blocked part of the order and temporarily ensured refugees and travelers who reached U.S. soil would not be deported.

Here's an explanation of what happened so far and what could come next.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut residents gathered on Sunday in opposition to President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration.

Updated at 6:55 p.m. ET

They began Saturday as a series of pop-up demonstrations outside several major airports. But by Sunday, the protests against President Trump's temporary immigration freeze had leapt from those airports to squares and plazas in cities across the U.S.

Outside the White House, in Boston's Copley Square and Battery Park in New York City, immigrant advocacy groups have organized protests to register their discontent with the executive order Trump signed Friday.

Leaders in the U.S. technology sector say President Trump's executive order banning immigrants from some Muslim-majority countries will sow confusion in their businesses and undercut the diversity that has been a linchpin of the industry's growth.

The CEOs of Google, Twitter, Facebook and Apple all issued statements condemning the ban and complaining that the order was pushed through so quickly it left great uncertainty about the status of some of their best employees.

In his continued efforts to address the number of undocumented immigrants in the country, President Trump took a harder line against cities and jurisdictions whose mayors have said they won't cooperate with his plans to enlist their police forces to help the federal government round up undocumented immigrants.

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

By the time the sun rose on Sunday in the U.S., the chaotic weekend set in motion by Trump's executive order on immigration was beginning to give way to greater clarity — in some respects, at least.

Updated at 5:40 a.m. ET Sunday

Federal Judge Ann Donnelly in Brooklyn, N.Y. granted a request by the American Civil Liberties Union and issued a stay late Saturday on the deportations of valid visa holders after they have landed at a U.S. airport. The ruling by Donnelly temporarily blocks President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration signed Friday.

According to NPR's Hansi Lo Wang:

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

President Donald Trump signed executive orders Wednesday directed at immigrants and national security. One order targets “sanctuary cities” that offer protections to undocumented residents in the United States.

With President Donald Trump expected to sign executive orders on immigration this week, about 300 people of Jewish, Muslim, Baptist and Catholic faiths vowed to protect each other from discrimination. On Tuesday night, New Haven police, schools and politicians rallied in solidarity with the congregation.

Updated at 5:50 p.m. ET

President Trump has signed two executive orders related to immigration and border security, moving ahead with his plans to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico and to deport people who are in the country illegally.

Screenshot / White House

President Barack Obama gave his final press conference at the White House on Wednesday, less than 48 hours before Donald Trump is sworn in. The topics included his recent commutation of Chelsea Manning's prison sentence, immigration, and the role of the press.

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