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immigration

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

New Fairfield resident Joel Colindres said he’s grateful to have been given a temporary stay from deportation by immigration officials.

“I just want nobody in the world to go through this. The pain that we’ve been having all this time -- it’s very hard,” Colindres said at a press conference Friday.

On Thursday, a federal judge granted Colindres the stay only 90 minutes before his plane was scheduled to take off for his native country of Guatemala.

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Native Americans have been getting forced off their land for a long time. Thomas Jefferson forced them from their ancestral home in 1804 after he signed the Louisiana Purchase and promised they shall know the United States as only "friends and benefactors." 

More than 200 people of different faiths gathered at St. Jerome Catholic Church in Norwalk on Monday night to support Jung Courville and her family. She’s a mother of two U.S.-born boys and is facing deportation to South Korea.  

In Connecticut, a father of two U.S.-born children faces deportation to Guatemala in 10 days.

Chicago's Mayor Rahm Emanuel is pushing back against the federal government.

On Monday, the city is filing suit against the Department of Justice, which announced it would withhold millions of dollars in police grant money from so-called sanctuary cities.

Emanuel is suing because he says new rules for a federal crime-fighting grant go against the Constitution and the city's values.

"Chicago will not let our police officers become political pawns in a debate," Emanuel said.

Quebec continues to be inundated with asylum-seekers fleeing the U.S. to reach Canada. In order to house the influx of people, the government has opened the Olympic Stadium in Montreal.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A New Fairfield man ordered to be deported to his native Guatemala says he could be at risk of violence or kidnapping if he returns. Joel Colindres came to the United States illegally in 2004. He married a U.S. citizen in 2010 and they have two young children.

A week ago, Immigration and Customs Enforcement said Nury Chavarria had to board a flight to her native Guatemala. The mother of 4 U.S.-born children sought sanctuary at a New Haven church instead. Now Chavarria can leave the church basement and return home to her kids, while federal immigration court considers reopening her case.

Nury Chavarria, the Connecticut mother who sought sanctuary from deportation at Iglesia De Dios Pentecostal Church in New Haven, can return home to her four U.S.-born children. An immigration court in Hartford granted Chavarria motion for an emergency stay on Wednesday.

New Haven Mayor Toni Harp and State Child Welfare Commissioner Joette Katz have announced the release of New Haven’s emergency guide to help immigrant families prepare for the threat of deportation.

Tony Bacewicz / C-HIT

Arnold Giammarco, the Army and National Guard veteran deported to Italy nearly five years ago, is back home in Connecticut with his wife and daughter.

The highest court in Massachusetts ruled Monday that local law enforcement cannot keep people in custody solely at the request of federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The practice, often known as an "ICE detainer," enabled federal authorities to take a longer look at the immigration status of people whom they suspect might be in the country illegally, even if they were otherwise free to leave.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Nury Chavarria has been in the United States for more than 20 years. Last week Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, tried to compel her return to her native Guatemala, but she sought refuge in a New Haven church.

A Sunday night vigil for Nury Chavarria drew hundreds, including Mayors Harry Rilling of Norwalk and Toni Harp of New Haven, to Igelsia de Dios Pentecostal Church in New Haven. They came to support the Norwalk mother of four who is living in the church to avoid deportation.

NIAID / Creative Commons

It’s mosquito season and the Zika virus still remains a threat in many parts of the world — including here in the U.S.

This hour, we hear the latest on efforts to develop a Zika vaccine and we find out what researchers have learned since last summer about how the virus causes microcephaly in newborns. 

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