immigration

Is Donald Trump considering wavering on a key campaign promise?

That's what several news reports published over the weekend suggest. And while the Trump campaign issued a statement denying any shift on immigration policy, top surrogates and campaign operatives hinted that a change just might be on its way.

The issue: what to do with the estimated 11 million immigrants already living in the United States illegally.

Dominic Chavez / World Bank

A New Haven based refugee resettlement agency is set to welcome a record number of families. That’s due in part to the Obama administration’s goal to accept 85,000 refugees this year, with 10,000 from Syria. 

Mayte Lara Ibarra and Larissa Martinez had just finished their senior year of high school when they each decided to go public with their immigration status. Both Texas students came to the U.S. illegally, and they didn't want to keep that fact a secret any longer.

Ibarra identified herself on Twitter as one of the 65,000 undocumented youth who graduate high school in the U.S. Martinez revealed her status in the commencement speech she delivered at graduation.

Their actions sparked support and pointed criticism. That was more than a month ago.

courtesy CT Students for a Dream

Local Connecticut advocates are taking part in the launch of a national campaign for immigration reform called Reason for Reform.

Christian Haugen / Creative Commons

The Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil kick off on Friday, and here in Connecticut, our state’s large Brazilian community will be watching far from home. This hour, we learn more about why so many Brazilians come to the Nutmeg State and why it’s hard to say exactly how many Brazilians live here.

Erik (HASH) Hersman / Creative Commons

The Republican and Democratic National Conventions are just around the corner. The presumptive nominees? Two of the most unpopular presidential candidates in recent history: Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. 

NorwichBulletin.com

The ability of other countries to block the deportation of convicted criminals in the United States was the subject of a federal hearing Thursday. 

United States Air Force / Creative Commons

As it is in many election cycles, immigration is a big topic in presidential campaign speeches. Donald Trump has made it one of his top issues and has drawn lots of attention for his plan to build a wall along the Mexican border. But off the campaign trail, what does the immigration climate look like? 

Protesters in Hartford Call for Ban on Deportations

Jun 28, 2016
WNPR

Protesters in Hartford called for a moratorium on immigration-related deportations after a U.S. Supreme Court deadlock that effectively killed President Barack Obama's plan to help millions of immigrants living in the country illegally. 

U.S. Navy

This hour, we talk about three different stories that touch various people in our state. First, a check-in on how the Department of Defense has followed through with exhuming the remains of 388 sailors and Marines who died during the attacks on Pearl Harbor. Some of their relatives, including a Connecticut man, had asked for to give their loved ones a proper burial at home. We have an update on whether their requests have been heard. 

The Supreme Court deadlocked when it considered whether President Obama had the authority to shield millions of immigrants from deportation.

The 4-4 tie — announced in a single sentence by the court — deals a major blow to the president and leaves in place a lower court ruling that put his plan on hold.

Tony Thompson hopes the United Kingdom votes on Thursday to leave the European Union. Standing in a green smock behind his meat counter in the town of Romford, a short train ride from central London, the 58-year-old butcher explains why in four words.

"Got to stop immigration," says Thompson. "It's only an island. You can only get so many people on an island, can't you?"

Patti / Flickr

It's easy to think of borders as fixed, almost sacrosanct lines, so rooted in the natural order of things that it often doesn't occur to us to question them. But borders were not always thought of this way. In fact, the notion of well understood, and agreed upon boundaries between nations is somewhat new.

The New Haven Museum

Monday, June 20, is World Refugee Day. A new exhibit at the New Haven Museum shares the compelling stories and works from refugee artists who have resettled in the New Haven area.

A judge has rejected a lawsuit filed by Texas officials who want to halt the resettlement of Syrian refugees in the state.

The suit claimed the Obama administration had not adequately consulted with states before placing the refugees. In his decision, signed Wednesday, U.S. District Judge David Godbey ruled that the state has no authority over resettlements handled by the federal government, which has authority over immigration policy.

Godbey also found the state had failed to present plausible evidence that Syrian refugees pose an imminent risk.

Gabe Simerson / WNPR

A group of Muslim men and boys knelt in prayer in the Berlin Mosque as an imam recited from the Qur’an. A few hours earlier, they were downstairs, hosting their first "Youth Hangout" -- an afternoon of Jeopardy for high schoolers of all faiths designed to show solidarity in the face of anti-Muslim hate rhetoric. 

Immigrants fleeing gang violence in Central America are again surging across the U.S.-Mexico border, approaching the numbers that created an immigration crisis in the summer of 2014. While the flow of immigrants slowed for much of last year, nothing the U.S. government does seems to deter the current wave of travelers.

World Bank Photo Collection / Creative Commons

On Wednesday, Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy and 26 other Democratic senators sent a letter to President Obama expressing their deep concern about "the slow pace of admissions for Syrian refugees" and encouraged him to step up the process. 

A legal battle between refugee students and the school district of Utica, N.Y., may soon come to an end.

A settlement has been reached in a lawsuit claiming that refugees in Utica, a Rust Belt city located about four hours north of New York City, have been illegally blocked from attending the local high school.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut's governor has received the 2016 John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award for his public support of resettling Syrian refugees in the U.S. 

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

A new play premieres Thursday night at the Yale Cabaret that brings together Iraqi and Afghan refugees and U.S. veterans who tell their stories.

During her sophomore year at Southern Connecticut State University, Cinthia Perez and her younger brother dropped out. They decided to work full-time because the family was struggling to pay tuition out-of-pocket.  

Perez said, “It was really hard for my mom, especially. She was like, ‘No, I want you guys to go to college because that would be the main key to help everyone in the family.’ But then we were like, ‘It was either that, or we’re just not going to have any food at home.’”

The fate of one of President Obama's controversial executive actions on immigration goes before the Supreme Court on Monday. The action would grant temporary, quasi-legal status and work permits to as many as 4 million parents who entered the U.S. illegally prior to 2010. The president's order applies only to parents of children who are U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents.

Of the 3 million students identified as gifted in the U.S., English Language Learners are by far the most underrepresented. And nobody knows that better than 17-year-old Alejandra Galindo.

"It's just kind of hard to not see people who look like me in my classes," she says. "I'm a minority in the gifted world."

Sweden has taken in more asylum seekers per capita than any other European country — 160,000 last year alone. Refugees are now part of the landscape, even in small towns. And nearly everybody, not just those working with aid groups, is encountering the newcomers.

In the southern town of Ronneby, Dagmar Nordberg is giving Swedish lessons to Waliullah Hafiz, who goes by Wali, at her kitchen table. The 60-year-old Swedish museum director met this 23-year-old migrant from Kabul on a train platform in a nearby village on a freezing cold day last November.

The first boats of refugees and migrants have arrived back in Turkey from Greece, as part of a new — and controversial — deal between Turkey and the European Union that takes effect today. It is aimed at stopping the flood of people seeking asylum in Europe.

Under the deal, every migrant who reaches Greece illegally from Turkey after March 20 will be returned to Turkey, unless they qualify for asylum. However, for every Syrian turned back, a Syrian refugee who has been vetted is to be resettled from Turkey in an EU country.

spediter / iStock/Thinkstock

Two former Connecticut residents who were deported to Italy have lost their bid to return to the state to testify before lawmakers about how criminal convictions and deportation affect immigrant families. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy has been named the recipient of this year's John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award for supporting the resettlement of Syrian refugees in the U.S. following the Paris terrorist attacks and personally welcoming a Syrian family to Connecticut that had been turned away from Indiana. 

NorwichBulletin.com

The federal government deports thousands of people from the U.S. each year. Number one on its priority list are violent criminals.

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

On Monday, March 28, a federal judge may rule on whether immigration officials must allow two former Connecticut residents back into the country to talk about why they were deported. 

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