WNPR

immigration

Migrants detained in recent months at the U.S.-Mexico border describe being held in Customs and Border Protection facilities that are unsanitary and overcrowded, receiving largely inedible food and being forced to drink foul-smelling drinking water.

In a lawsuit filed against Attorney General Jeff Sessions by the Los Angeles-based Center for Human Rights & Constitutional Law, some 200 individuals detained under the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy were interviewed, many of them relating poor conditions.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Two Central American migrant children sent to Connecticut after being separated from their parents at the border have been reunited with their parents and the families released into the community.

Paolo Zialcita / Connecticut Public Radio

A federal judge in Bridgeport has ruled that the Trump administration violated the constitutional rights of two Central American migrant children when federal authorities took them at the Texas border and sent them to Connecticut without their parents. 

Zairys Maysonet

Over 30 Jewish, Muslim, and Christian teenagers came together on the New Haven Green Tuesday to paint a 48-foot sign welcoming refugees. 

A Harvard brain scientist who studies trauma in children is warning of lasting damage to the young migrants who've been separated from their parents at the border.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Immigration agents approached a Danbury man outside of a courthouse in that city last Friday. Samuel Cruz-Coctecon, an undocumented immigrant from Mexico, attempted to escape, but did so into oncoming traffic and was hit by a car and injured.

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

Two immigrant children are suing the federal government after being separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border and transported 2,000 miles to Connecticut.

A new liberal rallying cry — "Abolish ICE!" — calls for an end to Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the agency that enforces President Trump's immigration policies.

Many protesters held signs with the slogan at marches across the country over the weekend, and several leading Democrats echoed the grass-roots catchphrase.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Hartford police arrested 35 protesters outside of the Abraham A. Ribicoff Federal Building and Courthouse Monday. The demonstrators challenged federal immigration policies and chanted “abolish ICE.” ICE stands for Immigration and Customs Enforcement -- a unit of the United States Department of Homeland Security that oversees the removal of undocumented immigrants.

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

Three members of Connecticut's congressional delegation have been denied access to visit migrant children being cared for in the state on behalf of the federal Department Health and Human Services.

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

People in several cities around Connecticut joined a day of action Saturday to protest the federal government’s continued separation of migrant families. 

Protesters gathered in major cities and small towns across the United States to denounce President Trump's immigration policies.

The "Families Belong Together" marches were planned in response to the administration's policy of separating children from their parents at the southern border.

Department of Health and Human Services

Governor Dannel Malloy recently wrote to Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar to say he’s prepared to dedicate state resources to reunite migrant children with their parents. Some immigration lawyers say that’s easier said than done.

Nelson Pinos has been living in a New Haven church for 208 days.

“It’s been several months that I’m stuck in this church without being able to provide for my family, without being able to tell my son when I’m gonna go back home when he asks me, which is very often. “

Pinos, an undocumented father of three, sought sanctuary at the First and Summerfield United Methodist Church last fall instead of boarding a plane to his native Ecuador.

Mark Fischer / Creative Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court decision to uphold President Trump's travel ban on five Muslim-majority countries as well as Venezuela and North Korea, is drawing criticism from Democratic lawmakers, the American Civil Liberties Union, and many Muslim groups.

Pages