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immigration

Central American migrants on a train in southern Mexico
Peter Haden / Flickr

Attorney General Jeff Sessions has announced that anyone who enters the United States illegally will be prosecuted, even if they are seeking asylum. This hour, we get the details on current immigration policies, and we ask: what has “legal immigration" really meant throughout our country’s history?

Over the first weekend in April, U.S. Border Patrol agents arrested 20 people for entering the country illegally in Vermont, New Hampshire and New York.

What happens when an immigrant facing deportation seeks sanctuary in a church, but then needs to leave to get surgery? That happened in western Massachusetts this week. 

Late spring is graduation season for schools across the United States. It's a time of joy and hope for many, but for DACA recipients and their families it can bring added anxiety. For many of these "DREAMers," the threat of deportation looms over their graduation celebrations.

NPR's Scott Simon spoke with Jessica Moreno-Caycho, a DREAMer graduating this May from Virginia Commonwealth University.

Moreno-Caycho said she came with her family to the United States from Peru in 2003. She was 8 years old when she arrived.

U.S. immigration officials view Harold James Tatum as a Honduran but Tatum views himself as a New Yorker. Tatum was deported to Honduras 18 years ago but he says he's never really gotten used to it.

"I don't even know the national anthem of this country," says Tatum, sitting behind a table selling jewelry near the beach in Tela on Honduras' Caribbean coast.

HStocks / Thinkstock

Union leaders representing janitors, maintenance, and food service workers in Connecticut say the end of Temporary Protected Status for Honduras is unfair and will tear families apart.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Until there’s a resolution on the future of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals -- or DACA -- program, Alan Dornan of Wethersfield said he’ll protest and walk the streets in support of Dreamers -- those brought to the United States as children.

Updated at 8 a.m. ET

A few of the nearly 200 migrants from Central America who traveled by caravan through Mexico to the U.S. border crossing at San Diego have been allowed to apply for asylum.

Eight migrants — three women, four children and an 18-year-old — who said they were fleeing violence in their home countries were allowed through the gate at the border separating Tijuana, Mexico, from San Diego on Monday evening, according to caravan organizers.

Updated 9:57 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments on Monday in an immigration case that could create a profound precedent for some immigrants living in the country without authorization.

Saud Anwar

The military of Myanmar has been carrying out a campaign of ethnic cleansing against Rohingya Muslims. This hour we talk with a Connecticut delegation who just returned from a humanitarian mission to a refugee camp in neighboring Bangladesh and a political science researcher studying the crisis. What is the role of the U.S. as this massive humanitarian disaster unfolds?

Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

They came from countries like Haiti, Italy, Canada, Mexico, and Ghana. And on Thursday, inside the downtown Hartford Public Library, 50 immigrants took the Oath of Allegiance from U.S. District Judge Vanessa L. Bryant.

City councilors in Springfield, Massachusetts, passed an order Monday night that says the city will not interfere with religious institutions that provide sanctuary to immigrants.

Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

Like many of his neighbors, Bernie Michel came to Hartford from somewhere else.

In Michel’s case, Ohio.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Supporters of an undocumented Pakistani couple fighting a deportation order came together in New Britain, Friday. They hoped to raise awareness on what the couple is going through by meeting up at the pizza restaurant the couple owns.

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