WNPR

Hurricane Maria

Homes lay in ruin as seen from a U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Air and Marine Operations, Black Hawk during a flyover of Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria.
Credit Kris Grogan / U.S. Customs and Border Protection

As Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the region recover from the devastation of Hurricane Maria, WNPR is committed to telling the stories of residents with ties to Connecticut.

If you have loved ones in Puerto Rico and want to share your story, please email us at news@wnpr.org.

Coverage of Hurricane Maria from WNPR, the New England News Collaborative, and NPR:

On the side of a busy expressway in northern Puerto Rico, dozens of cars stand in a line, parked at careless angles off the shoulder. Drivers hold their phones out of car windows; couples walk along the grass raising their arm skyward.

This is not a picturesque stretch of road. It's about 90 degrees out, and the sun is beating down relentlessly. All you can hear is the rumble of cars and trucks passing by, sometimes dangerously close. Then, inside a Ford Escape near the edge of the highway, Casandra Caba exclaims, "Look!"

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

As Puerto Ricans emerge from the devastation of Hurricane Maria, family members back in the continental U.S. are desperately trying to get in touch. In Connecticut, political leaders are focused on both how to rebuild, and how to find their loved ones.

Carmen Ocasio has a lot of family on Puerto Rico. She said Wednesday that she is not watching television or going on social media. She can't handle it. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

As Hurricane Maria bore down on Puerto Rico Wednesday, several nonprofits met in Hartford to plan relief efforts.

Maria Sanchez-Cruz

Two weeks after Irma pounded the Caribbean, Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico on Wednesday.

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