human rights

Capitol Hill
2:46 am
Mon December 8, 2014

Congress Clashes Over Release Of CIA 'Torture Report'

Senate intelligence committee chairwoman Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., is again defending her report on CIA torture methods, which was set to be released this week.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue December 9, 2014 9:06 am

Leaders on Capitol Hill are at odds regarding a report on CIA methods — including torture — used to extract information in the so-called war on terror.

Chairwoman of the Senate intelligence committee Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., has been fighting for the release of her 480-page executive summary of the report since April of this year, and it finally was scheduled for a reveal this week.

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World
10:53 am
Sat November 8, 2014

Two Americans Held In North Korea Are Back On U.S. Soil

Matthew Miller, who had been held in North Korea since April, 2014, is greeted by two unidentified women after arriving Saturday at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Sun November 9, 2014 5:11 am

Updated at 4:45 a.m. ET Sunday

Americans Kenneth Bae and Matthew Todd Miller, held for months in North Korea, received a joyful homecoming Saturday as their plane set down at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, south of Seattle.

Bae, 45, a Korean-American missionary and tour guide from Lynnwood, Wash., thanked family and supporters for not forgetting about him during his detention.

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Germany
10:06 am
Tue November 4, 2014

'Arbeit Macht Frei' Gate Stolen From Former Dachau Death Camp

The entrance to the former concentration camp in Dachau, Germany, bears the Nazi slogan "Work Makes You Free." The gate was stolen over the weekend.
Johannes Simon Bongarts/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 4, 2014 11:58 pm

German authorities say they're investigating possible neo-Nazi involvement in the theft of an iron gate at the former Dachau concentration camp bearing the infamous phrase: "Arbeit Macht Frei" or "Work Makes You Free."

Those eerie words greeted some 200,000 prisoners who arrived at Dachau, which was the first concentration camp the Nazi regime opened in Germany. Tens of thousands of people sent there died from starvation and overwork as well as from medical experiments, torture and violence between 1933 and 1945.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
12:04 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

Pssst...We Need To Talk About Sanitation

Sarah Albee is the author of "Poop Happened: A History of the World From the Bottom Up" and more recently, “Bugged: How Insects Changed History” and her newest book, "Why'd They Wear That?" will be published in February
Chion Wolf WNPR

Our show today is a long-planned look at human waste. In other words... Poop. It has taken on a slightly more somber cast now that Connecticut is monitoring the possibility of its first case of Ebola.

But, in some ways, we've got the perfect guests, especially Rose George, whose book about sanitation begins in a small town in Ivory Coast "filled with refugees from next door Liberia." Rose is looking for a toilet and eventually succumbs to the reality that there is no such place. There's a building where people do their business on the floor.

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Nobel Prize
8:20 am
Fri October 10, 2014

Pakistani Teen Malala Yousafzai Shares Nobel Peace Prize

Malala Yousafzai poses for photographs in New York. Yousafzai, who survived being shot by the Taliban because she advocated education for girls, has been been named one of two recipients for the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize.
Frank Franklin II AP

Originally published on Sat October 11, 2014 5:00 pm

Updated at 11:50 a.m. ET

Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani teen who was attacked by Taliban militants for promoting education for girls, will share the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize with Kailash Satyarthi, an Indian campaigner against exploitation of children.

The Norwegian Nobel Committee says on Nobelprize.org:

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Middle East
3:37 am
Fri October 3, 2014

ISIS Captives Tell Of Rapes And Beatings, Plead For Help

Displaced demonstrators from the minority Yazidi sect demonstrate outside the United Nations offices in Irbil, Iraq, on Aug. 4 in support of those held captive by the self-proclaimed Islamic State.
Azad Lashkari Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri October 3, 2014 8:57 am

When militants from the self-proclaimed Islamic State swept through the Sinjar area of northern Iraq in August, they killed hundreds and kidnapped unknown numbers of men, women and children.

The fate of most of them is still unknown, but activists and those who have escaped recount horror stories of rapes and beatings. They're trying to focus international attention on those still being held.

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Human Rights
10:28 am
Wed August 27, 2014

U.N. Says Assad Regime, Islamic State Are Committing War Crimes In Syria

An injured man sits after being treated at a medical center following shelling in the city of Douma, Syria.
Abd Doumany AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 3:14 pm

A report presented by the United Nations today paints a pretty grim picture of Syria.

It tells the story of a country mired in a ruthless civil war in which all sides are indiscriminately killing and torturing civilians. It presents a laundry list of human rights violations and war crimes undertaken by both the forces of President Bashar Assad and non-state armed groups, such as the Islamic State, that are fighting to topple the regime.

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Islamic State
8:01 am
Wed August 20, 2014

U.S. Authenticates Video Of Militants Beheading American Journalist

James Foley in Aleppo, Syria, in September 2012.
Manu Brabo/freejamesfoley.org AP

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 4:40 pm

This post was updated at 2:25 p.m. ET.

A video that was released online Tuesday in which the extremist group the Islamic State claimed to behead American journalist James Foley is authentic, according to U.S. intelligence analysts. Foley was abducted in Syria in 2012.

The video was uploaded to YouTube on Tuesday afternoon and later removed; since then, it has resurfaced elsewhere online. The images show Foley kneeling next to a masked militant and reciting comments against the U.S. before being killed.

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The Two-Way
8:52 pm
Thu August 7, 2014

Obama Authorizes Limited Airstrikes In Iraq

Iraqi Christians who fled violence in the village of Qaraqush rest upon their arrival at the St. Joseph church in the Kurdish city of Irbil.
Safin Hamed AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 8, 2014 8:23 am

This post was updated at 9:45 p.m. ET.

President Obama has authorized targeted airstrikes against Islamic militants where needed and if militants advance toward American personnel in northern Iraq, he said Thursday night.

The president also said American planes have dropped aid and supplies to religious minorities in Iraq who have fled the extremist group the Islamic State.

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Victim Privacy
3:18 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

East Haven Mayor's Release of Harassment Complaint Upsets Accuser

Credit filmfoto/iStock / Thinkstock

The East Haven town employee who alleges that Mayor Joseph Maturo sexually harassed her at work was shocked to learn that her name was released to the media this week by the mayor’s office, according to her attorney. It’s unusual for these kinds of complaints to be released.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Tue July 15, 2014

Transgender Rights: "The Civil Rights Issue of Our Time"?

Susan Bigelow.
Chion Wolf WNPR

Those who identify as transgender Americans continue to face social stigmas, discrimination, and legal issues not often faced by other members of the LGBT community.

This hour, we talk with some transgender rights experts and advocates about what Vice President Joe Biden has called "the civil rights issue of our time."

We also check in with WNPR reporter Lucy Nalpathanchil, who gives us the latest on the case of transgender teen Jane Doe.

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Madres De Plaza De Mayo
8:37 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Argentina's "Dirty War" Provides Backdrop for a New Play

A scene from Claire Whitehouse's play "a la ronda" based on stories from the Madres de Plaza de Mayo.
Credit Ariella Axelbank

  A la ronda, a new play opening this weekend at Wesleyan University, calls attention to Argentina's "Dirty War" and the human rights organization Madres de Plaza de Mayo.

During the so called "dirty war" of the late 70's and early 80's, tens of thousands of Argentineans were systematically abducted and killed, suspected of being an enemy of the military dictatorship.

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Holocaust
2:06 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

Film Documents Children's Rescue From the Nazis -- and One Lives in Hartford

Ivan Backer, 84, a Hartford resident rescued by Sir Nicholas Winton during the Nazi takeover of Prague.
Chion Wolf WNPR

Next Monday marks the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, International Holocaust Remembrance Day. Next week in Woodbridge and Madison, there will be two screenings of the film "Nicky’s Family," a Czech documentary that tells the nearly-forgotten story of Sir Nicholas Winton, a British stockbroker who organized the rescue of 669 children just before start of World War II. 

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Remembering Nelson Mandela
8:05 am
Tue December 10, 2013

In the Footsteps of Mandela: a Trip to Robben Island

A gate at Robben Island.
Joachim Huber Creative Commons

Official memorial services for late South African president Nelson Mandela will be held this week, in Soweto, in Pretoria, and in the remote village of Qunu, in the Eastern Cape province where he spent his childhood. But Mandela’s legacy will forever be linked to another remote destination: Robben Island, ten miles off the shores of Cape Town, where he served the majority of his 27 years in prison.

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Nelson Mandela
12:02 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

Remembering Mandela: "The People's Choice"

Credit Megan Torrey

When I was a young teen in the '80s, I remember watching the news and learning about apartheid in South Africa. I remember learning about a powerful man who had been jailed simply for believing in equality and freedom, all watching the evening news, and seeing protests at Yale against apartheid. 

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The World Grieves
5:16 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

Reactions to Nelson Mandela's Death

Credit South Africa The Good News / Creative Commons

President Barack Obama reflected in a statement Thursday evening on the passing of former South African President Nelson Mandela. "We will not see the likes of Nelson Mandela again," he said. "It falls to us to carry forward the example that he set."

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The Two-Way
8:14 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Does China Deserve A Seat On The U.N. Human Rights Council?

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon speaks at the Human Rights Council at the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, last year.
Anja Niedringhaus AP

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 8:00 pm

The United Nations elected 14 members to the Humans Rights Council on Tuesday, but some of the picks are seen as controversial.

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Europe
5:18 am
Sat November 9, 2013

Bearing Witness To Nazis' Life-Shattering Kristallnacht

View of a destroyed Jewish shop in Berlin on Nov. 11, 1938, after the anti-Semitic violence of Kristallnacht. The pogrom unleashed Nazi-coordinated attacks on thousands of synagogues and Jewish businesses.
Keystone-France Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 2:26 pm

On a busy street in Berlin's shabby-chic district of Kreuzberg, the gray and dirty pavement glistens with little brass cobblestones. Millions of these stones are embedded in sidewalks all over Europe. They commemorate the last address the city's Jewish residents called home before the war.

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Violence Against Women
7:50 am
Wed October 23, 2013

UConn Conference Looks at a Global Issue: Violence Against Women

The United Nations calls violence against women a "global epidemic."
Credit Say No--Unite / Creative Commons

The University of Connecticut held a day-long conference on Violence Against Women on Tuesday. The gathering came just a day after seven women filed a federal discrimination complaint against the school, claiming they were victims of sexual assaults while students at UConn.

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Here & Now
7:36 am
Mon September 23, 2013

Almost 200 Years Later, Slave Gets Proper Burial

About 60 people gathered at the Connecticut State Capitol to pay respects to an 18th-century Connecticut slave known as Mr. Fortune. (Chion Wolf/WNPR)

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 4:21 pm

Slavery is an accepted part of the history of the American South. But it was also practiced throughout the North.

Around the time of the American Revolution, Connecticut had more than 6,000 slaves, the most in New England.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Diane Orson of WNPR brings us the story of an 18th century Connecticut slave whose remains were recently laid to rest, more than 200 years after his death.

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Iran
3:44 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

Iran Frees Political Prisoners

Iranian lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh smiles at her house in Tehran on Wednesday, after being freed from prison.
Behrouz Mehri AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 5:17 pm

Human rights lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh was among several political prisoners released by Tehran on Wednesday, just days ahead of a visit by Iran's newly elected moderate president to the United Nations in New York.

Sotoudeh, who had been held since 2010, was one of eight women and three men released, according to the BBC. Reformist politician Mohsen Aminzadeh was also among the prisoners freed.

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Hardships
11:17 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Iraqi Refugees in America embrace freedom, but face many challenges

Nearly 30,000 refugees live in Connecticut today. They come from everywhere from Sudan to Cuba to Eritrea – and since the beginning of the Iraq war 10 years ago, more and more have come from there. Many resettle in New Haven with the help of a non-profit agency known as Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services, or IRIS. WNPR’s Neena Satija reports.  

Noor and Ben don’t want to reveal their real names. They still have family in Iraq they’re concerned about, and say the situation is very bad there. Here, they feel free. 

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Where We Live
10:35 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Working For Equality

susieqc3, Flickr Creative Commons

Women's rights pioneer Marcia Ann Gillespie was in state for Women’s Day at the capitol.  We talked to her about her rise to prominence as the editor-in-chief of Essence magazine, and the fight for gender and racial equality.  

But first, Hartford Area Habitat for Humanity started out as a small grassroots organization... And next year will turn 25. It is building in eight different cities and towns in the region and completing its 200th home. Habitat’s vision is a world where everyone has a decent place to live.  

 

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Women's Public Policy Issues
12:55 pm
Tue November 27, 2012

Women's Policy Day at the State Capitol

Chion Wolf

Tuesday was Women's Policy Day at the State Capitol. 

The event, hosted by the Connecticut Permanent Commission on the Status of Women and five women's advocacy groups, highlighted public policy issues facing women this upcoming legislative session, and also served as a crash course on how to become an effective advocate for women's issues. Anna Doroghazi is public policy director for the Connecticut Sexual Assault Crisis Services, one of the sponsors of the event:

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News
4:07 pm
Wed October 10, 2012

Aid From Connecticut to Syria

Ed Brambley (Flickr Creative Commons)

As the civil war continues to escalate, humanitarian organizations are struggling to get aide to refugees inside Syria. One Connecticut resident is working to smuggle in food and medical supplies.

It's dangerous for humanitarian groups to bring aide to those inside Syria. A lot of that aide is going to refugees that have fled into neighboring countries. But there are still 5 million people inside the war-torn country that need help.

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War on Terror
8:22 am
Tue September 25, 2012

British Terror Suspect To Be Extradited To Connecticut

The European Court of Human Rights has given final approval for a British terror suspect, wanted in Connecticut, to be extradited. 

37-year old Babar Ahmad is accused of raising funds for terrorists through an internet service provider based in Trumbull, Connecticut. 

He was arrested as part of a larger investigation that led to the 2008 conviction of former Navy sailor Hassan Abu-Jihaad. Abu-Jihaad leaked classified information through a website that Ahmad allegedly operated. 

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Protestors
12:37 pm
Wed April 11, 2012

Morning Edition: Occupy New Haven Lives Another Day

Chion Wolf

Occupy New Haven protestors will be able to remain on the city green...for now. 

There were some tense moments on the city green right after noon on Tuesday, as police and bulldozers began dismantling the encampment Occupy New Haven protesters have called home for the past six months. On Monday U.S. District Judge Mark Kravitz said the city could remove the protesters beginning noon on Tuesday. The city apparently took that noon deadline seriously.

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War on Terror
7:21 am
Tue April 10, 2012

British Terror Suspect May Be Extradited To Connecticut

The European Court of Human Rights has cleared the way for a British terror suspect, wanted in Connecticut, to be extradited.  

37-year old Babar Ahmad is accused of raising funds for terrorists through an internet service provider based in Trumbull, Connecticut. 

He was arrested as part of a larger investigation that led to the 2008 conviction of former Navy sailor Hassan Abu-Jihaad.  Abu-Jihaad leaked classified information through a website that Ahmad allegedly operated. 

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Where We Live
12:40 pm
Mon March 12, 2012

Racial Profiling

Emad Ghazipura (Flickr Creative Commons)

It has been a sad - but well-known - fact that in many communities, “Driving While Black” or “Driving While Hispanic” can be seen as a reason to get pulled over by police.

While the state has a law that mandates reports on the ethnicity of drivers pulled over in traffic stops - that data is not universally reported by towns. And the state agency that collects it is overburdened.

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Where We Live
11:19 am
Fri January 13, 2012

Trust in Black America

Chion Wolf

Both socially and politically, blacks are the least trusting racial group in the U.S.

So says UConn political science professor Shayla Nunnally who’s written a new book exploring “Trust in Black America” - She says the African American legacy of experiencing racial discrimination makes them distant from and distrustful of the American political system, its institutions, and its politicians.

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