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Dru Bloomfield / Creative Commons

More young adults live in their parents’ homes today than in 1940. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, roughly 34 percent of the nation’s millennials live in their childhood bedrooms or their parent’s basements. 

Dru Bloomfield / Creative Commons

More young adults live in their parents’ homes today than in 1940. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, roughly 34 percent of the nation’s millennials live in their childhood bedrooms or their parent’s basements. 

Bart Everson / Creative Commons

Thousands of Connecticut children have elevated levels of lead in their blood. This is often the result of lead dust in the home or in the soil outside.

Bart Everson / Creative Commons

Get the lead out -- at least, that's what Connecticut renters Rosie Gallant and Adam Golka hoped to do after discovering the toxin in their Woodstock home. This hour, we hear their story and find out how repeated lead exposure has impacted the health of their infant daughter. 

Alex "Skud" Bayley flickr.com/photos/alexsbayley / Creative Commons

Unless you have a greenhouse or hoop house, you're probably buying greens this time of year. It's good to support local growers, but you can grow nutritious greens right in your windowsill without an elaborate light system. 

Ciera Holzenthal flickr.com/photos/cierah / Creative Commons

I first came across tillandsia, or air plants, at a boutique garden center in San Francisco a few years ago. This trendy plant seemed like the answer to many people's dreams of a low-care house plant. 

Guilherme Cardoso flickr.com/photos/guiskatenator / Creative Commons

I recently returned from a trip to India, and while visiting a friend in his garden outside Delhi, I was struck by one brilliantly colored, red plant. This five-foot-tall and -wide plant looked familiar. Upon closer inspection, it was a poinsettia.

Tracey Adams flickr.com/photos/bikracer / Creative Commons

One of the simplest and most rewarding activities to bring in some holiday cheer this time of year is to make your own wreath. You can go to local garden centers and take a wreath-making workshop, or buy a pre-made wreath. But I like to construct my own wreath made from materials around my home. 

kaboompics.com / Creative Commons

When I drive around and see home owners raking and bagging their leaves to remove them from their yard, I think they're missing a big opportunity. 

Rosewoman / Creative Commons

When was the last time you changed your address? Well, if you're like most Americans, it probably wasn't that long ago. According to the Census Bureau, the average U.S. resident will move 11.7 times in his or her lifetime. This hour, we take a closer look at why we're on the move so much. What does it take to truly feel at home where you live? It's something journalist Melody Warnick writes about in her new book called This Is Where You Belong

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut is home to many historic landmarks -- among them is the former residence of American architect and icon Philip Johnson. Since it opened to the public in 2007, Johnson's Glass House has welcomed thousands of visitors from across the country and around the world. 

Mary Anne Williams

Your home is one of your biggest investments, but some Connecticut residents are seeing that investment crumble because of failing foundations. This hour, we find out what the state is doing to help those whose homes and futures are -- quite literally -- falling apart beneath them. 

Rosewoman / Creative Commons

When was the last time you changed your address? Well, if you're like most Americans, it probably wasn't that long ago. According to the Census Bureau, the average U.S. resident will move 11.7 times in his or her lifetime. This hour, we take a closer look at why we're on the move so much. What does it take to truly feel at home where you live? It's something journalist Melody Warnick writes about in her new book called This Is Where You Belong

F_A / creative commons

Hissing sprinklers, humming mowers, buzzing weed whackers: the quintessential sounds of summer are also symbols of an American mission -- to craft the so-called “perfect lawn.” 

Shane Adams / Creative Commons

Hissing sprinklers, humming mowers, buzzing weed whackers: the quintessential sounds of summer are also symbols of an American mission -- to craft the so-called “perfect lawn.”

This hour, we trace the history of American lawn culture and explore some of the latest turf trends. From trimming, to fertilizing, to xeriscaping, we want to hear from you. How do you care for your lawn during these hot, dry summer months? 

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