history

The Colin McEnroe Show
3:10 pm
Wed May 15, 2013

To Serve Man: Cannibalism In History, Pop Culture, And Nature

Wikimedia Commons

Two cannibals are eating, and one of them says, "I don't like my mother in law," and the other one says: "So just eat the noodles."

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History
3:58 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

AMERICA’S FIRST WOMAN GOVERNOR

Charles William Eldridge

Ella Tambussi Grasso was born to Italian immigrant parents in Windsor Locks, Connecticut on May 10, 1919. She attended the Chaffee School in Windsor and earned a scholarship to Mount Holyoke College where she earned both BA (1940) and MA (1942) degrees.   At an early age, she displayed an interest and belief in public service, and soon after completing her education, became involved in the Democratic Party in Connecticut.  She was first elected to the state General Assembly in 1952. In nine subsequent state and federal elections, she was never defeated. She also served two terms in U.S.

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History
3:17 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Learning about the Lusitania

In an age when we hear instantly of any news, good or bad, it is hard to imagine that information was not always so readily available.  On May 7, 1915, the RMS Lusitania sank off the coast of Ireland from damage caused by a German submarine’s torpedo.  For hours, it was little more than an unconfirmed rumor that the ship had sunk, and many accounts incorrectly reported the ship was beached with no loss of life.  Approximately an hour and a half after the sinking, a cablegram to the New York City office of the Cunard Line, the steamship line that owned and operated the Lusitania, confirmed t

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History
12:37 pm
Fri April 26, 2013

One of Hartford’s Heroes

When he perished while fighting a fire on May 24th, 1878, Hartford photographer Daniel S. Camp died as he had lived: in harm’s way and in the line of duty. Besides being a respected photographer, Camp was a volunteer firefighter, Second Lieutenant in the City Guard, and a veteran of the Civil War, having seen service in Connecticut’s Sixteenth Volunteer Infantry.  In his short 34 years he left behind a legacy of public service as well as some truly remarkable photographs.

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History
2:57 pm
Sat April 20, 2013

Scraps of History

Mary Pamelia Felt was born in New York City on January 1, 1848, and in 1867 married John Emery Morris of Hartford. She would have remained just another Hartford resident if not for her penchant for clipping newspapers. Her collection of 188 obituary and social scrapbooks were donated to CHS in 1925.  CHS recently digitized and put online her 52 “social” scrapbooks which are filled with clippings about engagements, weddings, divorces, lectures, vacation plans, travels abroad, visits from dignitaries, Thanksgiving proclamations, and descriptions of inaugural balls.

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The Faith Middleton Show
8:06 am
Sat April 13, 2013

Connecticut’s First State Barn Trail, Author Of Take A Deep Breath And

Connecticut launches it's first barn trail complete with an iPhone app. Helen Higgins, from the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation, walks us through the process of how the barns are chosen and what the trail has to offer.

Take a Deep Breath: Clear the Air for the Health of Your Childby Nina L. Shapiro

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History
3:48 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

“A NOBLE AND PRECIOUS LIFE”

A handful of maps of Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Maine, published in Philadelphia during the early 1850s, bear the name of E. M. Woodford. Edgar M. Woodford was born April 15, 1824,  in Avon, Connecticut, where his family had a farm. Self-taught as a civil engineer, Woodford became county surveyor for the County of Hartford. A nephew recalled his Uncle Edgar as “a great strapping man,” who would come “over the hills with his [surveying] instruments over his shoulder, crying for fear his work would not come out right.”

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History
3:26 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Is Martha Stewart History?

With over thirty books published and millions of magazines devoured by fans eager to organize their homes, prepare delicious meals, and simply be crafty, Martha Stewart has become known as the most successful modern domestic advisor in the United States.  But domestic advice of the kind Stewart doles out in her television appearances, print, and internet publications is not something new.  Domestic advisors have long had a place in America’s kitchens and homes and have been providing women with guidance on how to manage their homes and cook appropriate meals for hundreds of years. 

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History
3:49 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

A Night to Remember

Steam power captivated the popular imagination in the nineteenth century. Regular steam navigation on the Connecticut River dates back to the early 1820s. Hartford and New York were linked by steamers whenever the river was ice free, typically from March through November of each year.

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Where We Live
11:58 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Shaping Hartford Culture Through Three Generations Of Women

The Library of Congress Historic American Building Survey

Today, we’re going to delve into a bit of Connecticut History that you may not know, and later, the story of a group of determined women who saved and preserved Hartford’s Mark Twain House.  

We’ll also talk about how we talk about ourselves.  Charley Monagan, who just left Connecticut Magazine, wrote a piece called “Who We Are” in the latest issue.  It’s a look at Connecticut’s longstanding inferiority complex and how we brand ourselves.

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Where We Live
12:16 pm
Fri March 8, 2013

From Your Freezer To Antarctica: All About Ice

Timothy Englert

Today, we’re talking about ice --- and no, not because of today’s weather.

But the icy regions of our planet are telling us important information about our climate. Ice locks in historical data that researchers are just starting to unlock. They’re finding greenhouse gases trapped during the industrial revolution and even the results of nuclear arms testing.

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Where We Live
12:07 pm
Thu January 10, 2013

The Wonderful World of Tinkering

Breakfast for Dinner/Sinclair Lewis (Flickr Creative Commons)

What do Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Edison, Steve Wozniack, and the Wright Brothers have in common?

They’re tinkerers, of course.

Yes, tinkering isn’t just something that your uncle does on the weekends. As author Alec Foege says, tinkerers help make America great.

Today, the word tinkering can refer to any number of things. From fixing up old cars, to designing things with 3D printers, tinkerers are using the tools at their disposal to make even better tools, gadgets, and items that many of us take for granted.

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Where We Live
11:04 am
Fri December 14, 2012

Connecticut Eccentricities Revisited

Chion Wolf

Today we revisit our show on Connecticut eccentricities, looking into all the nooks and crannies that make the state unique. We’ll answer burning questions like: What’s the real story behind the name “Nutmeg State”? What do you call yourself if you’re from Connecticut? We’ll talk about whether every town in CT really has a Prospect Street.

What makes your town unique or puzzling? What local history is important about where you live? What makes you proud to be in your part of Connecticut? 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:43 pm
Thu December 6, 2012

The Science & History Of The Christmas Story

Ralph and Jenny, Flickr Creative Commons

How much of the Christmas story is true?

Most scholars will tell you the December 25th date has much more to do with pagan festivals of the early Christian era. If you want people to celebrate something, pick a date when they're already celebrating.

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Where We Live
10:06 am
Thu December 6, 2012

History of New Haven: Register, Lincoln and a Bit of Music

New Haven Register

The Hartford Courant is - famously - the oldest continuously published newspaper in the US.  But the New Haven Register has its long and storied history.

This year is the 200th anniversary of the paper - and today, where we live, we’ll talk about the history of the Register, and the city it covers.

From the early days of the paper, to the Amistad case, from Abraham Lincoln’s election, to his death, and the role of New Haven’s longest-running institution, Yale University in the city’s history.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:21 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

"Still Revolutionary" & Connecticut's War-Filled Past

Wikipedia

Do people care about their own history?

Movie box office reports would suggest that they care about vampires approximately three times as much as they care about Lincoln and the end of slavery. Most people in Connecticut, I'm convinced, know almost nothing about the history of Connecticut and can only be persuaded to care by great exertions -- such as the one we're about to make.

But writer Robert Sullivan offers a novel approach. If you really want to connect with history, figure out where it happened, and go there, and have your own adventures.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
3:22 pm
Tue November 13, 2012

Witch Trials & Vampire Hearts: Connecticut's Superstitious Past

Brian Barnett

Salem, Massachusetts gets all the notoriety, but Connecticut's prosecution of so-called witches started earlier and may have been more fierce.

In “The Witchcraft Delusion in Connecticut 1647-1697,” John M. Taylor lists thirty-five cases between 1647 and 1697.

There were at least 11 documented executions in Connecticut. The usual explanation is some combination of strong religious beliefs and a long string of hardships like epidemics, floods, and clashes with Native Americans.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:57 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Fab Fourology: Deconstructing The Lyrics & Music Of The Beatles

Flickr Creative Commons, AndywithCamera

In the fall of 1967, I was a deeply uncool 13 year old who knew relatively little about the Beatles.

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Where We Live
10:45 am
Mon November 5, 2012

Presidential Eccentricities

The Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association

These days, it seems as though we know just about everything (probably more than we need to know) about the men who are running for President. Every gaffe and personal trait gets a full treatment on SNL and on Twitter.

But throughout history, our presidents have had some pretty interesting things about them.

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Where We Live
10:35 am
Mon October 22, 2012

Presidential Magazine

HarshLight, Creative Commons

First - highlights of a “mock” presidential debate between two prominent Connecticut politicians at Central Connecticut State University last week. Ned Lamont has Obama’s back. Tom Foley is in Romney’s corner. It’s ON!

This week is also the 50th anniversary of Cuban Missile Crisis - we’ll look at how secret recordings JFK made help us understand the aftermath of this complicated time.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
3:23 pm
Tue October 16, 2012

What It Takes 'To Go Viking'

Flickr Creative Commons, jcubic

The very word "Viking" is complicated because it describes both a people -- those who lived in Scandinavian countries from 800 to 1100 -- and a behavior -- setting out in boats for trade, plunder, or both.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:18 am
Wed October 10, 2012

'Ella Grasso: Connecticut's Pioneering Governor'

File Photo

I dug up an old photo of me and Gov. Ella Grasso, both wearing Army helmets.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:44 pm
Wed October 3, 2012

On Being A Magician

Hieronymus Bosch, Wikimedia Commons

A magic act is sort of a joke we're all in on, right? We may not know how it's done, but we know it's an act.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
3:10 pm
Thu September 27, 2012

Connecticut's Checkered Past In Politics, Suffrage, And War

Flickr Creative Commons, cliff1066

There's an oft-cited quote from John Adams writing in 1808, after his presidency. "Connecticut has always been governed by an aristocracy, more decisively than the empire of Great Britain. Half a dozen, or at most, a dozen families have controlled that country when a colony, as well as since it has been a state." 

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History
3:42 pm
Sat September 8, 2012

New Connecticut on Lake Erie

If you drive through the area of Ohio still called the Western Reserve today, you will find towns named Norwich, Saybrook, New London, Litchfield, Mansfield and Plymouth. Many of these towns have a town green or square and the ubiquitous white-steepled church common in Connecticut.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
6:10 pm
Wed August 29, 2012

A Snapshot Of Sincerity In History, America & Modern Pop Culture

Flickr Creative Commons, katerha

It's hard to be sincere and not seem like a freak. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
5:49 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Live From A Forest: Discussing Hiking, Archaeology, Invasives & Connecticut's Trails

Chion Wolf

There are more than 800 miles of Blue-Blazed Hiking Trails in Connecticut. Today we're doing our show from one of them. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
3:42 pm
Wed May 23, 2012

The Real Revolutionary Connecticut & Other State's Theme Songs

rich701, Flickr Creative Commons

Maybe what Connecticut needed, during and immediately after the American Revolution, was a huge marketing campaign like the one recently announced. As most of you know, the state has just jumped into a $27 million marketing push with the slogan "Still Revolutionary."

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The Faith Middleton Show
4:33 pm
Mon May 21, 2012

Authors of Stealing the Mystic Lamb and Spellbound

Javier Carcamo/flickr creative commons

Stealing the Mystic Lamb: The World's Most Coveted Masterpiece

Jan van Eyck’s Ghent Altarpiece is on any art historian’s list of the ten most important paintings ever made. Often referred to by the subject of its central panel, The Adoration of the Mystic Lamb, it represents the fulcrum between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. It is also the most frequently stolen artwork of all time.

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History
3:17 pm
Fri February 24, 2012

A Beautiful and Goodly Tree

When Thomas Hooker and his party reached Hartford in 1636, they would have found majestic elm trees growing in the meadows along the Connecticut River.

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