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An Irish Storyteller's Tales Of Fairies And Famine

Mar 23, 2017
Helena Byrne / Ireland's Great Hunger Museum

In the 18th and 19th centuries, seanchaís were traveling storytellers who were welcomed into Irish villages to entertain and bring local news in return for food and a place to sleep. 

Eastern Connecticut Ballet

In the dance world, the body is the instrument. For decades, the ideal height for an aspiring female dancer was about five feet, five inches tall -- notably shorter than all the male dancers onstage. But today, more dance companies are breaking with that tradition, and Gloria Govrin is one of the reasons why. 

Victor Björkund/ Creative Commons

It's been 20 years since Connecticut's landmark Sheff v. O'Neill ruling, which said that segregation in Hartford schools was unconstitutional. This hour, we dive into an investigation by The Hartford Courant about how some neighborhood schools are still struggling, and how Sheff didn't solve the challenge of school integration. 

Paul Van Der Woof / Flickr Creative Commons

The Tragedy of the Commons follows the theory that people can't be trusted to take care of common property without degrading it or taking more than their fair share of resources. This idea was popularized by William Forster Lloyd, who published a pamphlet in 1833 using cow herders to prove that people couldn't be trusted to share our common resources wisely. He believed property should be owned privately.

Fighting For The Vote

Mar 8, 2017
FBI/wikimedia

Fifty-two years ago this week, 600 peaceful protesters gathered in Selma, Alabama for what would become known as The Bloody Sunday March. Their goal was to draw attention to the importance of protecting the vote, not just for African Americans, but all Americans. 

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