WNPR

Health Equity and Access Project

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People living in Connecticut’s rural areas are dying at a higher rate than the state average. New data just released by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that in the 68 towns designated as rural, death rates from major killers, such as cancer and heart disease, are all higher. 

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Health insurance for thousands of children in Connecticut could soon disappear.

That’s because Congress failed to meet a September 30th deadline to renew funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program, or CHIP.

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The mass shooting in Las Vegas is dominating the media news cycle. Since the tragedy Sunday night, TV news and social media have displayed a continuous stream of images and video of the chaotic scene at the Highway 91 Harvest Festival that left at least 59 dead.

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The rate of infants dying suddenly and unexpectedly has dropped in recent years, but data show that racial disparities persist.

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We’re inching closer to the end of the fiscal year and Connecticut lawmakers at the state capitol still haven’t been able to reach a budget agreement. Meanwhile at the nation’s capitol, Senate Republicans are postponing a vote on their controversial health care bill.

This hour: a tale of gridlock in Hartford and Washington. 

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Senate Republicans are expected to vote this week on their health care bill that includes cuts to Medicaid funding and allows states to curtail coverage for pre-existing conditions.

This hour, we get reactions from the state’s health care advocate Ted Doolittle and Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal.

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Researchers in Connecticut and nationwide are having a hard time recruiting minorities for clinical trials.

This hour, we find out why and we examine the impact on our health. Does mistrust of doctors and drug companies play a part?

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As Connecticut lawmakers continue to try and work out a new two-year budget, the parents of children and adults with developmental disabilities worry about the services they might lose.

This hour, we hear from these families and learn what’s at stake.

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Medicaid has become an increasingly important source of health insurance coverage for children in the United States. That’s especially true for children living in small towns and rural areas, according to a new report.

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Lawmakers continue to debate health care policy in Washington, and millions wonder if they’ll be insured in the future.

This hour, we consider the impact here at home.

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A genetic test that helps doctors determine how best to treat breast cancer -- and whether chemotherapy is likely to help -- is significantly more likely to be administered to white women than blacks or Hispanics, a Yale study has found.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The health care reform bill that passed the U.S. House of Representatives last week promises sweeping changes to the provisions of the Affordable Care Act. While a lot of attention has focused on things like pre-existing conditions, one of the less considered issues is what may happen to the treatment of mental illness and substance abuse. 

Demos

This hour, we tackle issues involving race, policy, and U.S. democracy with Demos President Heather McGhee.

Plus: a look at efforts to establish paid leave in Connecticut. If passed, how might new legislation impact the state's women of color? We find out and we also hear from you. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

National uncertainty over the future of the Affordable Care Act is making state officials nervous, and the CEO of Access Health CT, the state’s health care exchange, has told his board that he fears insurers could back out of the marketplace the state created. 

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HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the U.S. Nearly half of American adults have it according to a recent report from the National Center for Health Statistics.

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