WNPR

health care

vichie81/iStock / Thinkstock

The two health insurers who currently offer plans on the state's health care exchange say they intend to return in 2018, but both have requested hefty rate increases. The cost of health care generally looks set to rise in Connecticut, as the Department of Insurance gets to work to review insurers rate requests.

Ron Cogswell / Creative Commons

House Republicans in Washington have passed a law to undo the Affordable Care Act -- the signature legislation of President Barack Obama. But Connecticut officials and some health care advocates have not responded favorably. 

Jobs For Felons Hub / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s prison population is getting older, upping the demand for healthcare including hospice programs that serve inmates and ex-offenders.

This hour, we find out what it means to die with dignity behind bars. 

Demos

This hour, we tackle issues involving race, policy, and U.S. democracy with Demos President Heather McGhee.

Plus: a look at efforts to establish paid leave in Connecticut. If passed, how might new legislation impact the state's women of color? We find out and we also hear from you. 

Updated 5 pm April 3, 2017 to include the proposed Upton amendment.

The House may yet pass its bill to repeal and replace parts of the Affordable Care Act. But Republicans' options to fulfill their seven-year effort to undo the federal health law are getting narrower by the day.

"As of now, they still don't have the votes," said Rep. Pete King (R-N.Y.) as he was leaving a meeting of GOP members Tuesday. King has been heavily lobbied by both sides.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

National uncertainty over the future of the Affordable Care Act is making state officials nervous, and the CEO of Access Health CT, the state’s health care exchange, has told his board that he fears insurers could back out of the marketplace the state created. 

Donnie Ray Jones / Creative Commons

Sleep. We all need it. Yet, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly one in three U.S. adults does not get enough of it.

Coming up, we consider the impact of this and other sleep-related trends with Dr. Meir Kryger. His new book is called The Mystery of Sleep.

Scott Bauer / U.S. Department of Agriculture

The tick population and tick-borne diseases are steadily increasing in Connecticut and throughout the Northeast according to scientists. In response, Senator Richard Blumenthal announced a federal grant to enhance research efforts into mosquito and tick-borne diseases.

Two combat veterans from Connecticut are the lead plaintiffs in a class action lawsuit against the U.S. Army. They say an army review board failed to consider post-traumatic stress disorder when it decided not to upgrade their less-than-honorable discharges. The Yale Law Clinic filed the suit Monday in New Haven.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The screening process for refugees entering the U.S. involves multi-layered security checks, interviews, and an overseas medical exam. After their arrival, families will undergo another health assessment, usually coordinated by a resettlement agency.

It’s where their stories begin to unfold to the doctors and physicians-in-training at Yale University's Pediatric Refugee Clinic.

NIAID / Creative Commons

HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the U.S. Nearly half of American adults have it according to a recent report from the National Center for Health Statistics.

Bernard Goldbach / Creative Commons

The American Psychological Association says the 2016 presidential election was a major source of stress for a majority of Americans regardless of political affiliation. 

Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

A bipartisan group of legislators and advocates are urging passage of a bill that would allow all pregnant women in Connecticut access to insurance coverage for pre- and post-natal care.

Charles Fettinger / Creative Commons

 

Aspiring tyrants have long used disaster and terror to consolidate power and limit freedom. Hitler used the Reichstag fire to suspend the basic rights of all German citizens; more recently, Putin used the bombing of buildings in Russian cities to attack Russia's Muslim people in Chechnya.

The Affordable Care Act's worst enemies are now in charge of the vast range of health coverage the law created. They're also discussing changes that could affect a wider net of employment-based policies and Medicare coverage for seniors.

Although Republicans failed last month in their first attempt to repeal and replace the ACA, President Donald Trump vows the effort will continue. And even if Congress does nothing, Trump has suggested he might sit by and "let Obamacare explode."

Pages