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health care

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The American Psychological Association says the 2016 presidential election was a major source of stress for a majority of Americans regardless of political affiliation. 

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Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini has a message for Washington, as the uncertainty over health care reform continues. 

The American Cancer Society says Connecticut is one of two states that has not provided funding for tobacco prevention from money received from a 1990s settlement between the tobacco industry and 46 states.

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The U.S Senate recently rejected a number of Republican plans to repeal, replace, or just overhaul the Affordable Care Act. But the health care debate is far from settled.

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Can you believe President Trump’s transgender military ban "tweetstorm" was one week ago today? That attempt at tweets-as-policy-change didn’t quite work, and was soon overshadowed by John McCain’s rogue “thumbs down” on the critical GOP health care vote.  And as soon as we got used to the foul-mouthed Anthony Scaramucci, he’s out. 

Senate Republicans don't appear to be too worried about President Trump's latest round of threats.

In a moment of unexpected high drama, Republicans were stymied once again in their effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act — and they have John McCain to thank for it.

In the early morning hours Friday, the senator showed why he earned the nickname "Maverick" over his long tenure.

Betting that thin is in — and might be the only way forward — Senate Republicans are eyeing a "skinny repeal" that would roll back an unpopular portion of the federal health law. But health policy analysts warn that the idea has been tried before, and with little success.

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Say you break your leg. Fortunately you have insurance, so you head to an emergency room that’s in your insurance network -- and you think, at least when it comes to your medical bill, you’re all good.

But a new study out of Yale University finds you may not be.

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Republicans in Washington finally got closer to the goal they’ve had for about seven years - the repeal and replacement of Obamacare. Well, at least the repeal part.

The Affordable Care Act is not "exploding" or "imploding," as President Trump likes to claim. But Trump does hold several keys to sabotaging the insurance marketplaces, should he so choose — one of which his administration is reportedly weighing using.

The Republican scramble to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act has yielded yet another version of a health care overhaul bill, along with yet another score from the Congressional Budget Office — the second analysis from the nonpartisan agency in two days.

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It was a big week for Trumpcare. The GOP-led health care bill collapsed on Monday, when Republican's Jerry Moran of Kansas and Mike Lee of Utah said they wouldn't support the bill. Soon after, the Republican's "Plan C" -- repeal without a replacement -- was dead as soon as it hit the ground, losing support from GOP Senators almost immediately

President Trump has summoned all Senate Republicans to the White House on Wednesday for a debrief on the state of health care legislation effort in their chamber. Based on the week so far, the meeting may be more like a post mortem.

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Now that the Senate Republican health care bill has collapsed, the next step may be to vote on an outright repeal -- though that plan also faces political hurdles. But were the repeal to happen, it could have serious consequences for state residents.

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