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Hartford Region

Drones: Law Enforcement’s Newest Recruits

Apr 16, 2018
MIKI Yoshihito / Creative Commons

Rapidly advancing technology is changing the way we do a lot of things... including policing.

This hour: police drones are coming to Hartford. Are they an invasion of privacy or a helpful tool for law enforcement? And how are lawmakers debating this new technology? What do you think about police using drones? Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin is giving up his bid for governor, saying that he’s getting on now so his opponents won’ politicize the city’s financial woes.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The deadline to file federal income taxes is Tuesday. Many filers will use a paid preparation service on top of having to pay their taxes. But if you qualify for something the IRS calls the “Volunteer Income Tax Assistance” program or VITA, you can get them done for free.

Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

They came from countries like Haiti, Italy, Canada, Mexico, and Ghana. And on Thursday, inside the downtown Hartford Public Library, 50 immigrants took the Oath of Allegiance from U.S. District Judge Vanessa L. Bryant.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Central Connecticut State University has placed Joshua Perlstein, a professor in its theatre department, on administrative leave.

Rendering of Hartford Sports Group's proposed renovations to Dillon Stadium.
Hartford Sports Group

Hartford City Council approved a state-bonded $10 million renovation of the historic Dillon Stadium Monday night.

Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

Like many of his neighbors, Bernie Michel came to Hartford from somewhere else.

In Michel’s case, Ohio.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Supporters of an undocumented Pakistani couple fighting a deportation order came together in New Britain, Friday. They hoped to raise awareness on what the couple is going through by meeting up at the pizza restaurant the couple owns.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Six months after Hurricane Maria, evacuees from Puerto Rico are still looking for affordable places to live. And they’re looking to the government for help, particularly through available public housing, but they’re not getting it.

Samite playing flute
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Samite Mulondo went from a refugee camp in Kenya to collaborating with Paul Simon. This hour, the musician and Uganda native joins us in the studio to share his story and his music.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

It’s lunchtime at Central Connecticut State University and 10 students converge on their usual spot in the dining hall. They start talking about the food — and it becomes clear that they don’t love the rice. They explain that it’s not as seasoned as the homemade arroz in Puerto Rico.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A letter signed by Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin, Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim, New Haven Mayor Toni Harp, and six other mayors from Connecticut’s larger cities was sent to Governor Dannel Malloy Monday asking for assistance with evacuee families in three areas.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

A two bedroom unit at Brick Hollow in Hartford comes with a refrigerator, a stove, and a washer and dryer.

Maribel Perez has five people that live with her and no money to stock her new apartment with basic furniture.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

It’s mid-March and Hartford Public High School teacher Bridget Allison goes over essay-writing tips for her fourth-period class. After a while, she checks in on a group of students who are seated together — a few of the evacuees from Puerto Rico.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Hartford’s hurricane relief center was where evacuees from Puerto Rico could come to get help: help finding housing, jobs, winter clothing -- whatever supplies or services they needed to restart their lives in Connecticut.

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