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When Lane Murdock, a high school sophomore, heard that 17 high school students and educators had been killed in a shooting in Parkland, Fla., she says she felt numb.

To her, and so many others, mass shootings can feel all too common in the U.S.

"In the time I've been in high school we've had the Pulse, Las Vegas and now, [the Parkland] shooting," Murdock says.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The crowded race for governor finally began to narrow this week as Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin announced he is abandoning his bid to be the Democratic Party's nominee.

S.55, a bill that became the unexpected hot-button issue of the session so far, was signed into law Wednesday on the steps of the Vermont Statehouse.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The full legislature will get an opportunity to vote on two key gun control bills this session. Measures that would ban so-called ghost guns and bump stocks both passed out of the Judiciary Committee Tuesday. 

Fibonacci Blue / Creative Commons

A lot has happened in the recent days. The news is fast, complicated, disturbing and in some cases, hopeful.

Firearms manufacturer Remington Outdoor has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in hopes of staving off creditors amid a slump in sales and public outcry over gun violence.

Reuters reports that Remington's creditors, including Franklin Templeton Investments and JPMorgan Asset Management, have agreed to exchange debt for equity in the company.

Remington was founded in 1816 in upstate New York and is one of the largest and oldest U.S. producers of firearms. It was bought in 2007 by Cerberus Capital Management for $118 million.

Students in Hartford join the national walkout over gun violence.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Correction: An earlier version of this story incorrectly said that district administrators in Stonington did not respond to a request for comment. In fact, Stonington High School Principal Mark Friese responded to WNPR in an email before the story was published, and he provided his account of the day’s events, which is now included.

Stonington High School junior Caroline Morehouse was excited when she learned that her school would allow students to walkout of class to protest gun violence in a nationwide day of action on March 14. She'd be standing in solidarity with students from Parkland, Florida, who only a month earlier had lost 17 classmates in yet another school shooting.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The March For Our Lives event in East Haddam was one of 12 happening in Connecticut—and more than 800 across the globe for that matter. 

An earlier rally in Washington D.C. after the school shooting in Parkland, Florida.
Victoria Pickering / Creative Commons

The “March For Our Lives” takes place in various cities across the country this weekend. In Connecticut, Tyler Suarez, a freshman at the University of Bridgeport helped put together the march in Hartford.

Government health agencies have spent more than two decades shying away from gun violence research, but some say the new spending bill, signed by President Trump on Friday, will change that.

That is because, in agency instructions that accompany the bill, there is a sentence noting that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has the authority to conduct research on the causes of gun violence.

Students in Hartford join the national walkout over gun violence.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

School students around Connecticut joined a national school walkout in protest against gun violence Wednesday. But the way the event was handled by school administration varied widely from district to district.

Students rally outside the White House after the  Parkland school shooting.
Lorie Shaull / Creative Commons

Students will be walking out of schools across Connecticut Wednesday to express their concerns about gun violence. School districts around the state have been responding to the effort in different ways. 

Guns and gun safety continue to dominate this week, as the Florida legislature passed several gun-related measures. The provisions fall short of what newly-energized student activists wanted, but still represent a degree of victory for gun control advocates in a state that has seen few such "victories."

Sen. Richard Blumenthal
U.S. Senate Democrats

Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal is introducing legislation that would allow federal authorities to remove guns from a person who is deemed a threat to themselves or others. 

Francine Wheeler, the mother of 6-year-old Ben who was killed at the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School, testified at a hearing of Senate Democrats on Wednesday. Wheeler spoke alongside other survivors and family members, including a student who survived the shooting in Parkland, Fla., last month.

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