governors

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A legislative hearing was held Monday on a bill that would allow doctors to prescribe life-ending drugs to the terminally ill.  The session brought emotional testimony from those both in favor and opposed. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It's been a busy week in the news. In 2014 campaign news, the number of Republican candidates for governor went from six to five and then right back up to six. At the state capitol, lawmakers held two public hearings at the same time, both of which ironically had to do with Freedom of Information legislation.

Metro-North President Joseph Giulietti sent his 100-day plan to state Transportation Commissioner James Redeker on Monday. Giulietti is promising to rebuild a culture of safety at Metro-North to serve as the railroad’s "unshakeable foundation." He agreed to a 100-day plan to improve the railroad’s safety and operational performance in meeting with Governor Dannel Malloy last month.

C-SPAN

For months, reporters have been asking Governor Dannel Malloy if he is running for re-election this year. On Sunday, he shared his future plans: He is not running for president in 2016.

Oh.

On our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, we'll talk about Malloy's trip to Washington, D.C. for the National Governors Association meetings where he got into a well-publicized spat with Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal.

Closer to home, another investigation is taking place at the state capitol involving the use of a printer in Florida for campaign materials.

C-SPAN

Governor Dannel Malloy locked horns with Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal at a press conference after the National Governor's Association meeting.

he press conference was supposed to outline the bipartisan progress made during the conference, held in Washington, D.C. But in his remarks, Jindal criticized President Barack Obama's plans to raise the minimum wage. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Once again, Connecticut’s felonious former governor is making headlines. This time, John Rowland is hiring a criminal defense attorney as officials investigate his role in the 2012 congressional campaign of Lisa Wilson-Foley.

Our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse discusses this and all the week’s news from our downtown Hartford location.

Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick is preparing to deliver a belated State of the Commonwealth address.

Patrick initially planned to give the speech last week, but had to postpone it under the threat of a winter storm.

Patrick plans to give the speech Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.

It will become something of a political warm-up. President Barack Obama is scheduled to deliver his State of the Union address at 9 p.m. Tuesday.

The decision to delay the speech robbed it of some of its suspense.

The U.S. Supreme Court has decided against review a lower court decision that involves former Governor John Rowland and state unions. "In a statement, Rowland and his former budget director Marc Ryan said this: It is unfortunate that the Supreme Court is not taking this case. It will have a profound impact on Governors, Mayors, Boards of Education and taxpayers all across America." The Connecticut Mirror has more.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development is going to examine how the state of New Jersey spent $25 million of the federal aid it received after 2012's Hurricane Sandy, Rep. Frank Pallone, D-N.J., has announced.

In the end, Mark Darr had to give in.

Darr, the Republican lieutenant governor of Arkansas, announced Friday that he will resign Feb 1. Earlier this month, he agreed to pay the state ethics commission $11,000 in fines for making personal use of campaign funds and receiving improper expense reimbursements from the state.

Darr called his errors "careless and lazy," but said they were not intentional violations of the law. In a series of interviews with Arkansas news outlets Tuesday, Darr said he would refuse to resign.

A New Jersey State Assembly committee released a trove of documents Friday that shed more light on the bridge lane-closure scandal that is embroiling Republican Gov. Chris Christie's administration. The panel is seeking details on what's seen as an act of political retribution, which targeted the Democratic mayor of Fort Lee, N.J. It obtained the documents under a subpoena.

What New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said Thursday may have mattered less than how long he took to say it.

With his presidential ambitions and, potentially, his governorship put at risk by a scandal over lane closures on the George Washington Bridge, the Republican Christie fielded dozens of questions from reporters during a midday news conference that lasted nearly two hours.

Update at 8:15 p.m. ET: Gov. Christie Responds

In the late afternoon, Gov. Chris Christie released a statement expressing anger at the situation and denying involvement in what appeared to be an act of political payback:

Pete Souza / White House

Governor Dannel Malloy was quick to say that he didn't, and doesn't, want to make what happened in Newtown about him.

Still, on that day, Malloy was at the center of the story.  

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy was in Washington, D.C. on Monday to talk about Connecticut’s education reform initiatives. He spoke at a forum hosted by the conservative free-market think tank, the American Enterprise Institute. 

It's good to be Chris Christie these days.

Just a few weeks after his landslide re-election victory, the New Jersey governor won a second election this week: chairman of the Republican Governors Association.

The RGA chair is a largely ceremonial role, but in it, Christie will travel the country campaigning for other Republicans in gubernatorial races in 2014, a job that many see as groundwork for a potential White House run.

Jeff Cohen/WNPR

It's been nearly eleven months since the school shooting in Newtown that left 20 children and six educators dead. And prosecutors have yet to release their report into the crime.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie won re-election to a second term.

The Associated Press projected Christie, a Republican, the winner over Democrat Barbara Buono shortly after the polls closed in New Jersey at 8 pm ET.

While a big win by Christie was expected for months with polls showing him with a commanding lead, the victory nevertheless provides a springboard for a potential 2016 presidential run.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The state may shoulder more federal responsibilities as the government shutdown continues. Connecticut has already begun to foot the bill for almost $1 million worth of programs, including keeping open Head Start places in the state. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The Hartford Courant's Jon Lender has unveiled documents obtained by the paper about prospective gubernatorial candidate Tom Foley's 1981 traffic incident that landed him in a police cell for a night. The charges were dropped.

Rick Perry wants your business.

The Republican governor has been turning up in other states, touting the wonders of Texas and promising business owners they'll find lower taxes and more manageable regulation there.

"It does help get the word out to business leaders that may be frustrated," says David Carney, a longtime consultant to Perry. "Going in person can get literally hundreds of thousands of dollars of free media coverage."

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Join us for live updates during this hour of Where We Live with our guest, Tom Foley, who is exploring a run for governor. Foley made some recent public statements accusing Governor Dannel Malloy and others in his administration, past and present, of what he termed "improper behavior." The accusations were refuted by the Malloy administration as "factually incorrect."

Chion Wolf / WNPR

In this hour of Where We Live, we follow up with Tom Foley, who announced last week that he was exploring another run for governor. He joins us in studio to talk about his decision to possibly run against Governor Dannel Malloy again, and about some recent comments he made about ethics at the state Capitol.

WFSB screenshot

The race for governor is already heating up, more than a year before the 2014 election. Who’s providing the heat? It’s Republican Tom Foley, who’s kicking off his campaign for Governor Malloy’s job by throwing out some accusations and getting some accusations thrown his way. Seems like a job for our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse

Every day there's a new bit of drama surrounding likely GOP candidate for governor Tom Foley. In an interview with Mark Pazniokas of The Connecticut Mirror, Foley backtracks on allegations of impropriety he leveled at Governor Malloy. Paz and Dennis House of WFSB join Where We Live in The Wheelhouse for more on this story today at 9am.

Mark Pazniokas / The Connecticut Mirror

The week started off pretty rough with yesterday's news of a horrific shooting at the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C. Here's a dose of daily news you need to know now that does not involve violence... maybe just a little mud in the eye. 

WNPR

When he conceded the gubernatorial election in 2010, Republican Tom Foley said there was "no credible evidence" of voter fraud

Now, Foley says he's exploring a run in 2014.  And, looking back, the Republican says that while there was no evidence of fraud in 2010, he's convinced the system is full of it.  Fraud, that is.  Without it, he says he would have won. 

That got a rise of out Malloy's former advisor, Roy Occhiogrosso, on Twitter.

Jeff Cohen/WNPR

Republican Tom Foley is exploring a run for governor.  He's also exploring ways to take shots at Democratic Gov. Dannel Malloy.

One way he's doing that is by suggesting that Malloy is corrupt -- that he, among other things, gave state business to friends who did favors for him.

But when pressed later by Mark Pazniokas of the Connecticut Mirror to get specific, Foley wouldn't.

Welcome to the 2014 gubernatorial election.

Chion Wolf

Robert Braddock is going to jail for 38 months for his role in the scandal surrounding the congressional campaign of Chris Donovan. The judge said the long sentence would send a message to others about corrupt political behavior. If nothing else, it seemed to send a message to Braddock himself, who told her: "You couldn't force me to work in politics ever again."

"If the judge really wanted to make it worse," Braddock said, "she could have sentenced me to work for another campaign."

The Connecticut Mirror

School is back in session in Connecticut, and we all know what that means. More school buses, which means more traffic, which might mean more time in a car. And that gives you more time to listen to WNPR on the radio. But while we have you online, check out some of the latest stories we've been keeping an eye on... This is The Wheelhouse Digest.

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