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Ryan Caron King / WNPR

When Luke Bronin was running to be Hartford’s mayor, he said he wanted to spend some time looking under the hood at the city’s finances. He’s done that now, and what he's seen isn't good. In advance of his state of the city address tonight, Bronin sat down with WNPR to share his take on the city's budget. 

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / Creative Commons

Few of us remember Hurricane Ike as vividly as we remember Katrina and Sandy. But for people down in Houston, Texas, the 2008 storm was a major wake-up call. 

Open Grid Scheduler / Flickr

An effort is underway to bring high-speed internet to residents across Connecticut and create competition for the existing cable and broadband companies. The CT Gig Project includes public officials who say it is needed for economic development, competition, and innovation. Opponents don't think the government should get involved in the internet business. 

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

Immigration reform is a hot topic this presidential election year. Often, the question of who’s living here illegally centers on the many immigrants who cross the country's southern border. But the federal government deports people from countries across the globe. That includes a Connecticut woman who in three months must leave the country and her family. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Before delivering his "State of the State Address" two weeks ago, Gov. Dan Malloy said his budget proposal would be "austere" and that's what he delivered. His proposals include sweeping cuts across state government and he has heard from some critics of those cuts during town hall meetings. This hour, the governor stops by WNPR to discuss the state budget and other issues facing Connecticut.

Chup Yip So via flickr.com / Creative Commons

Governor Dannel Malloy announced this week that 15 Connecticut towns will receive funding through the state’s Small Town Economic Assistance Program (STEAP).

Chion Wolf / WNPR

More trains! Wider roads! Fixed bridges! The governor’s big plan to fix our transportation system has a lot in it but the state is still figuring out how to pay for it. Department of Transportation Commissioner James Redeker stops by for an update on the state of Connecticut’s current transportation infrastructure and plans to overhaul the system.

The White House / flickr

While basketball didn’t take up residence in the White House in January 2009, the game nonetheless played an outsized role in forming the man who did, according to Sports Illustrated’s Alexander Wolff, author of The Audacity of Hoop: Basketball and the Age of Obama.

The Justice Department has named a veteran prosecutor from Philadelphia as the new leader of its pardon office, which is trying to review more than 9,000 petitions in the final year of the Obama presidency.

Robert Zauzmer, 55, has worked since 1990 at the U.S. attorney's office in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. Justice Department leaders said Zauzmer represented a "natural choice" for the pardon job, in part because of his experience training prosecutors all over the country in how to evaluate prisoners' requests for early release.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Governor Dan Malloy delivers his "State of the State" address Wednesday as the legislature reconvenes for this year's regular session. The state budget deficit looms large over the capitol and deep cuts throughout government are expected. The session also starts in the wake of high-profile corporations testing the waters of relocation to other states.

How "Perfect" Is The U.S. Constitution?

Jan 29, 2016
Mr.TinDC / Flickr Creative Commons

From a land use standoff in Oregon, to a gun rights standoff looming in Washington, the U.S. constitution is under daily scrutiny in American life. This hour, we'll explore the foundational but outdated document called the Constitution. The system to amend the "living document" has only been utilized twice since 1970. Does new life need to be breathed into the Constitution and how politically feasible would that be in 2016?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Despite an effort the eliminate the state budget deficit late last year, the numbers remain in the red just a week before this year's regular session begins. Gov. Dan Malloy has tapped his troubleshooter to temporarily take the helm of the beleaguered Connecticut Department of Motor Vehicles, and a high school doesn't want any "idiots" on its stage. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

A new report on Connecticut's civic health was released Tuesday. This hour, we discuss its findings with Secretary of the State Denise Merrill. 

vxla / Creative Commons

Last week, Puerto Rico defaulted on millions of dollars in debt payments, spurring legal action from bond insurers. This hour, we get the latest on the island's economic crisis, including Governor Alejandro García Padilla’s pleas for Congressional intervention

White House

What is the state of the union? It's probably strong, as the previous five presidents have said. This hour, our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse will recap President Barack Obama's final State of the Union address. We also look ahead to the race for his successor. Former President Bill Clinton swings through Connecticut to fundraise for his wife's campaign.

How "Perfect" Is The U.S. Constitution?

Jan 5, 2016
Mr.TinDC / Creative Commons

From a land use standoff in Oregon, to a gun rights standoff looming in Washington, the U.S. constitution is under daily scrutiny in American life. This hour, we'll explore the foundational but outdated document called the Constitution. The system to amend the "living document" has only been utilized twice since 1970. Does new life need to be breathed into the Constitution and how politically feasible would that be in 2016?

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

It’s the 2015 finale to our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, and what a year it’s been. From the unlikely return of Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim, to ongoing discussions about a new casino, the news kept us on our toes. This hour, we recap not only the week’s news, but the year’s news with our panel and you can join the conversation with the stories that mattered most to you.

Cloud4Treasurer2015 / Facebook

Hartford’s city council has decided to let city Treasurer Adam Cloud keep his $20,000 raise. 

Senado Federal / Flickr

It goes by many names: the sharing economy, the collaborative economy, the peer economy, just to name a few. Whatever you want to call it, one thing's for sure: this new way of doing business -- where idle assets equal big profits, and the hard-earned currency of trust comes through user reviews -- is changing the economic landscape of our country.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Hartford’s Pedro Segarra was a reluctant mayor. He got pulled into it after his predecessor, Eddie Perez, was convicted on corruption-related charges and resigned. Now, his term comes to an end this week.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Two issues are swirling in the capital city -- one is whether the new minor league baseball stadium will be finished on time and on budget. The other is $20,000 raise given to city Treasurer Adam Cloud that nobody seems to remember. And, soon, Hartford will have a new mayor in place to deal with both.

City of Hartford

Add Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra’s name to the list of elected officials who didn’t know that Hartford Treasurer Adam Cloud got a $20,000 raise.

Seinfeld / NBC

It's time to air your grievances about the news of 2015. Our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse will convene for the first time ever on the Costanza-invented holiday of Festivus! We have lots of grievances, but what do you want to speak up about? Who should participate in the feats of strength?

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Hartford city Treasurer Adam Cloud has just gotten a $20,000 raise, but not one member of the city council remembers approving it.

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