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Chion Wolf / WNPR

Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty won re-election to the 5th District last November.

This hour, the Connecticut Democrat stops by our studios. We wade through national politics and find out what issues top her agenda on Capitol Hill. 

State election officials from around the nation sent a decisive message to the federal government about releasing private voter information.

Monday’s unanimous resolution comes after a recent, controversial request from President Donald Trump’s Commission on Election Integrity.

The resolution says the National Association of Secretaries of State is committed to ensuring election security. But it also emphasizes that the U.S. Constitution grants the states autonomy to administer elections.

Hywell Martinez / Creative Commons

This week, President Donald Trump's "Commission on Election Integrity," under the leadership of Vice-President Mike Pence and Kansas Attorney General Kris Kobach, sent a letter to all 50 states asking them to provide data on citizens that includes personal information like the last four digits of social security numbers and voting history. The request is unprecedented in its scope. As of today,  44 states are refusing to comply. 

Ryohei Noda / Creative Commons

Hannah Arendt's 576-page magnum opus, The Origins of Totalitarianism, is a densely-written book about the rise of anti-Semitism up to the outbreak of World War I. The book sold out on Amazon within one month of the 2016 election in which America elected Donald Trump as their next president. 

President Trump plans to nominate Republican Brendan Carr, the general counsel of the Federal Communications Commission, to fill one of the agency's two empty leadership seats.

Carr is a former legal adviser to current FCC Chairman Ajit Pai and was a lawyer with Wiley Rein LLP, which has worked with telecommunications companies including AT&T and Verizon.

The White House announced the president's plan late Wednesday.

Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

This hour, we pull apart Attorney General Jeff Sessions's testimony to the Senate Intelligence Committee

Chion Wolf / WNPR

He is no longer just the “junior senator from Connecticut.” Since joining the U.S. Senate in 2013, Democrat Chris Murphy has expanded his profile on the national stage. 

This hour, we sit down with the U.S. senator. We dive into Washington politics and tackle the issues he thinks are most relevant to Connecticut residents. 

Comey To Take Center Stage

Jun 8, 2017
Paul Morigi / Brookings Institution

This hour we preview the upcoming Senate Intelligence hearing and the much anticipated testimony of former FBI Director James Comey.

Connecticut U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal joins us and we dig into the legal repercussions that could follow.

UW Health / Creative Commons

Medicaid has become an increasingly important source of health insurance coverage for children in the United States. That’s especially true for children living in small towns and rural areas, according to a new report.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The Federal Railroad Administration is working on plans to bring more high speed rail to the Northeast Corridor. It’s the busiest stretch of passenger rail in the nation that spans from Washington, D.C. to Boston.

Jay Phagan / Creative Commons

This hour: privacy, policy, and the post-Snowden era.

Coming up, we hear how an exhibition at Hartford's Real Art Ways is challenging perceptions of corporate and government tracking. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut's two United States senators have responded to the abrupt termination of FBI Director James Comey, and both are calling for an independent investigation.

Updated at 11:00 p.m. ET

For months, Democrats in Congress have criticized and questioned FBI Director James Comey about his handling of last year's investigation into Hillary Clinton's private email server.

Still, they've met President Trump's surprising Tuesday evening decision to fire Comey with near-universal outrage.

New England states are considering the idea of sticking with daylight saving time year 'round. Proposals to make the switch are being taken up by several legislatures, including Maine's.

The Federal Communications Commission will vote on May 18 to formally begin the process of loosening regulations that enforce the so-called net neutrality rules for Internet providers.

Ajit Pai, who became chairman of the commission in January, says he supports a free and open Internet, which rests on a basic principle of "net neutrality."

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