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It seems like a lot of Americans are interested in the net-neutrality debate. Some 22 million public comments have been filed with the Federal Communications Commission on the issue of whether all web traffic should be treated equally.

Evan Kalish / Postlandia

When Alexis de Tocqueville toured America in the early 1830's to gather observations that he would later put on the pages of Democracy in America, he was impressed with the efficiency of our American Postal Service.

Office of Governor Dan Malloy / Flickr

Wine may soon be on sale in local grocery stores -- just one of the options Governor Dannel Malloy released Wednesday designed to mitigate the Connecticut's projected $208 million budget deficit.

Cali4beach / Creative Commons

Last night saw the unlikeliest of upsets in Alabama. Democrat Doug Jones, propelled by a big turnout from the state's urban and suburban voters, very narrowly defeated Republican Roy Moore in a special election that could have big consequences in Washington - and even in Connecticut. 

Leave out for a minute any analysis of what this means as a referendum on Trumpian politics, or the race for congress in 2018, this win by Jones could mean that Republicans’ tax bill is in jeopardy. 

Updated at 12:44 a.m. ET

Democrat Doug Jones has won the Alabama Senate special election, a victory that was a stunning upset in a deeply red state that voted overwhelmingly for President Trump. The president, who had backed Republican Roy Moore despite multiple accusations of sexual misconduct and assault, congratulated Jones on Twitter.

With a single 8 a.m. tweet, a classic Trumpian feud has erupted between the president of the United States and the junior senator from his home state, a high-profile female Democrat who called his tweet "a sexist smear."

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., was attending a bipartisan Senate prayer meeting Tuesday morning when she got a phone call. President Trump had tweeted about her.

This appears to have been a response to Gillibrand's call on Monday for Trump to resign.

Alabamians head to the polls Tuesday to vote for their next U.S. senator. For some, it will be the third time this year they've cast a ballot to determine who will assume the seat recently occupied by current Attorney General Jeff Sessions for two decades.

The circuitous path to get to this point has been nothing short of extraordinary.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

WNPR’s Jeff Cohen and Ryan Caron King are back on the ground in Puerto Rico.

This hour: an update from The Island Next Door. We get the latest on local recovery efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. 

Legislative leaders in Connecticut are to meet this week to discuss the state’s continued fiscal problems despite having recently passed a bipartisan budget.  

Daniel Voyager / Creative Commons

Today's Scramble will be another all-call show. We won't have any guests -  just you and your calls to Colin. 

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET

The new head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau started work Monday — whoever that is.

President Trump's pick to lead the consumer watchdog, Mick Mulvaney, arrived at the office early Monday morning with a bag of Dunkin' Donuts in hand. Mulvaney, the director of the Office of Management and Budget, is the acting director of the group until Trump can get a permanent leader through the Senate confirmation process — at least, according to the Trump administration.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy has condemned the legislature’s decision to take over control of the CT-N public affairs network as “despicable.” 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Voter registration numbers have been released and there are about 125,000 new registrants ahead of Tuesday’s municipal elections in the state.

srophotos / Creative Commons

CT-N, the network which has covered all of the doings of the state legislature for almost 20 years, will go dark as of 5:00 pm Friday. 

bluesbby / Creative Commons

President Trump wants to "Make America Great Again," by turning back the clock to a time he believes was safer, purer, and removed from the dangers of modern society.

He's not the first president to evoke nostalgia for the Rockwellian image of small town life where everyone knew one another, had a good job, and raised a family. The mental scene may vary but the nostalgia for something lost remains constant.

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