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In her day job, Chicopee, Massachusetts, attorney Tahirah Amatul-Wadud does family law -- divorce, custody, child support. But on her own time, she's filed civil rights lawsuits on behalf of Muslim communities who feel threatened, especially African-American Muslims like herself.

Fort George G. Meade Public Affairs Office Follow / Creative Commons

Make room, troops. Last week, the Boy Scouts of America unveiled a major decision -- starting next year, the organization will begin admitting girls. Yes, that’s right. Girls.

While the news has been met with applause by some, others have expressed more critical views -- including the Girl Scouts. This hour, we find out why. 

alkruse24 / Creative Commons

Sixteen years after the U.S. entered into war with Afghanistan -- a look at one woman's efforts to inform and inspire young Afghan girls.

This hour, Shabana Basij-Rasikh talks about her upbringing under the Taliban in Kabul and about her experience co-founding SOLA -- the School of Leadership, Afghanistan

Daniel X. O'Neil / Creative Commons

We talk to New York Times op-ed columnist Gail Collins about the Department of Health and Human Services decision Friday to give employers and corporations a reason to deny contraception coverage to their female employees. All they need is to hold a "sincerely held" religious or moral objection to birth control. 

Jon Olson

Six years ago she became the first female to lead the Hartford Symphony Orchestra. This hour, Carolyn Kuan talks about her intricate journey to the Connecticut stage.

It's the latest in WNPR's "Making Her Story" series, recorded live at the Warner Theatre in Torrington, Connecticut. 

Melania Trump is in many ways a first: The first First Lady to have arrived as an immigrant, the first to have been born in a communist country, and the first to be the 3rd wife of a president. She is not the first, however, to show signs of reluctance towards embracing the role of FLOTUS.

Raffaele Pagani / Flickr

Perhaps the most surprising thing about the Amazons of ancient Greek mythology is that they were not entirely mythical. While many of the deeds and details ascribed to these women warriors were imagined, the Amazons themselves were inspired by a real-life horse-riding tribe of nomads called the Scythians.

Em Lansey / Flickr

According to mytho-historical accounts, the ancient Amazons wore pants while riding into battle. But the trend this tribe of warrior women set was short lived. For nearly two millennia after their demise, the notion of women wearing pants was steeped in controversy.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, we remember Women’s History Month with tributes to the inspiring twentieth-century women -- the so-called "motor girls" and "Kalamazoo gals" -- who helped shape American history and American industry. 

ACLU

A police officer has filed suit against the town of Cromwell, claiming her rights were violated when her employer refused to modify her job duties while she was pregnant. 

Updated at 7:25 p.m.

President Trump has signed a memo implementing his new policy on transgender people serving in the armed forces.

A senior White House official told reporters that no transgender individuals will be allowed to join the armed services unless and until the secretary of defense and secretary of homeland security recommend otherwise.

The U.S. Army / Creative Commons

The White House has issued a memo that bans transgender people from enlisting in the military.

Transgender members of the U.S. military would be subject to removal at Defense Secretary James Mattis' discretion — and the service would bar transgender people from enlisting, under new White House guidelines for the Pentagon. President Trump announced the ban via a tweet last month.

Rough details of the guidelines were confirmed by NPR's Tom Bowman after the White House plan for the Pentagon was reported by The Wall Street Journal.

Helge V. Keitel / Creative Commons

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, an estimated 56 percent of women will be employed or looking for work by the year 2024 -- that's a nearly one percent decrease from 2015.

Still, investment in female leadership has grown at some workplaces -- including Connecticut-based United Technologies Corporation.

Femunity / flickr creative commons

As the men of Apollo 11 returned home to ticker tape parades, the women who made their journey possible worked quietly behind the scenes. Since its founding in 1958, NASA has been heavily reliant on the skills of such women, many of whom have gone unrecognized for their bravery and hard work.

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