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Spartacon3000 / Wikimedia Commons

The USDA recently proposed recommendations that would require foodmakers to label their products if they contain genetically modified ingredients.

Genetically modified crops have been portrayed as everything from a dangerous health risk to a miracle solution to tackle world food shortages. But among all this debate, many of us may not really know what a “genetically modified organism” (GMO) even is.

This hour, we ask: what does it actually mean for food to be genetically modified, and should we care if it is?

Anthony Bourdain's Twitter profile just says, "Enthusiast."

The chef, food writer, Parts Unknown host, Top Chef judge — the enthusiast — has died from an apparent suicide. He was 61.

Alina Kuptsova (Flickr)

Gardening is known for its folklore, especially when it comes to insect controls. Some old wives tales have some truth to them and others, not so much. I’m often asked about companion planting for insect control. Although many say plants such as onions, marigolds, and rue can deter pests, scientifically, few of these folklore remedies have been proven. 

poppet with a camera (Flickr)

What vegetable grows like a cucumber, looks like a teeny watermelon, can be eaten raw and has a hint of lime flavoring?  It's a cucuamelon.

Cucamelon is not a cross between a cucumber and watermelon, but it sure looks like it. They are also called Mexican sour gherkins or mouse melons. They are so cute! This Central American native vegetable vines like a cucumber, and produces an abundance of 1-inch long oblong, striped fruits that look like miniature watermelons. The taste is like a cucumber with a slight lime flavor.

Updated at 6:21 p.m. ET

The House rejected a $867 billion farm bill on Friday — after spending days negotiating with key conservatives in an attempt to pass the bill without the support of Democrats.

The vote was 198-213. Every Democrat voted against the measure, as did 30 Republicans. Many of the GOP lawmakers are members of the House Freedom Caucus and voted no after failing to get concessions on spending and a future vote on immigration in exchange for their support.

Frank Farm (Flickr)

I'm always looking to push the envelope of what we can grow in your climate. I think I got fig growing down, so my latest adventure is fresh ginger. I love the flavor, and I love cooking with ginger root. Ginger also has many medical qualities such as aiding digestion, improving circulation, and helping combat arthritis.

Paul (Flickr)

Mother's Day started back in the late 1800s when Julia Howe, lyricist of the “Battle Hymn to the Republic,” called upon all mothers to protest the senseless killing of their sons during the Civil War.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

An estimated 13,000 Puerto Ricans came to Connecticut after Hurricane Maria, according to The Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College.

Spartacon3000 / Wikimedia Commons

The USDA recently proposed recommendations that would require foodmakers to label their products if they contain genetically modified ingredients.

Genetically modified crops have been portrayed as everything from a dangerous health risk to a miracle solution to tackle world food shortages. But among all this debate, many of us may not really know what a “genetically modified organism” (GMO) even is.

This hour, we ask: what does it actually mean for food to be genetically modified, and should we care if it is?

Asparagus shoots begin to rise from the ground.
Sigfrid Lundberg / Creative Commons

Asparagus is one of the few perennial vegetables we can grow and, if cared for well, can produce for decades. Asparagus is not only tasty, it's talented.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The original Lost in Space, an Irwin Allen series that aired on CBS for three seasons in the 1960s, was a marginal ratings success with seemingly outsized cultural impact. The show is still remembered for its campy humor, its catchphrases, and its not-possibly-designed-in-any-decade-but-the-1960s robot.

Netflix's new Lost in Space, on the other hand, tells the Swiss-family-Robinson-in-space story as a relatively serious family drama with super high production values and the mostly serialized narrative that's become the custom on prestige TV. The Nose has thoughts.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Wes Anderson is a... particular sort of filmmaker. With his typewriters and his pipe smoking. With his monochrome sets and props and costumes. With his perfectly symmetrical compositions. The one place where Anderson's tweeness is maybe softened a bit is in his old-school, stop-motion, animal-centric animated films. There was Fantastic Mr. Fox. And now there's Isle of Dogs. Dogs isn't without its own problems, though. The Nose weighs in.

Colin Dunn / Creative Commons

A mosaic of boldly colored labels and brightly lit bottles, the vitamin aisle is as much a drug store staple as it is a monument to a multi-billion dollar industry. This hour, we trace the history of dietary supplement sales in the U.S. and consider why these supplements remain so popular today. 

Jellaluna / flickr creative commons

In 2016, a Swedish brewery offered for sale artisanally-prepared potato chips. $59 for five chips in what looks like a jeweler's box. They sold out. Crazy, right?

But be honest: Have you gone to more than one place looking for just the right coffee bean or golden beet or ...something? Meanwhile, behind all this posturing, what do Americans really cook and eat?

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

When the massive omnibus spending bill was passed by Congress and signed by President Donald Trump last month, Community Development Block Grants actually received an eight percent funding increase through September 2020.

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