finance

UConn Today flickr.com/photos/uconntoday/6213709043 / Creative Commons

University of Connecticut officials plan to raise tuition by more than $3,000 for in-state students and $4,000 for out-of-state students over the next four years.

Puerto Rico has managed to make a payment due today on its bond debt, but officials are warning that the commonwealth's fiscal position remains tenuous.

As a result, the government will have to pay for essential government services by using money budgeted for upcoming debt payments, said Melba Acosta Febo, president of the Government Development Bank for Puerto Rico, in a statement. She added:

Consumers seeking health policies with the most freedom in choosing doctors and hospitals are finding far fewer of those plans on the insurance marketplaces. And the premiums are rising faster than for other types of coverage.

The U.S. drug giant Pfizer and its smaller rival Allergan have agreed to merge, creating the world's biggest pharmaceutical company by sales.

The $160 billion deal is the largest example so far of a corporate inversion, in which a U.S. company merges with a foreign company and shifts its domicile overseas in order to lower its corporate taxes.

Tax Credits / Flickr Creative Commons

Are you wondering whether to buy or rent a home? Or how much to save for your child’s education? How much should you set aside for retirement, depending on your age? 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy has rolled out more support for his fresh look at the Connecticut state pensions system, but he’s still getting pushback from some of the state's constitutional officers.

The Senate passed a bill at 3:12 a.m. ET Friday that would raise the debt ceiling and fund the government into 2017. This means that there would be no fiscal standoffs and threats of government shutdown for more than a year.

The measure is now on its way to the White House for President Obama's signature, NPR's Ailsa Chang reports for the Newscast unit:

"For months, there was real concern the looming Nov. 3 deadline to lift the debt ceiling was going to send Congress into crisis mode, right when it was picking a new speaker of the House.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

In the middle of bipartisan negotiations with state lawmakers over a gap in the current year budget, Governor Dannel Malloy's administration unveiled a new series of measures aimed at making the state budget more sustainable in the long run. But the problem and the fix are so complicated that he called it "a little mind-bending" in a meeting with reporters.

Tax Credits / Creative Commons

Are you wondering whether to buy or rent a home? Or how much to save for your child’s education? How much should you set aside for retirement, depending on your age? 

Alex Baker Photography

Many churches around the country are struggling with declining attendance, prompting some interesting questions and conversations. Is it the message? A sign of the times? The church’s mission? Maybe it’s past controversies. 

Flazingo Photos flazingo.com / Creative Commons

Unemployment among teenagers and young people in Connecticut stands at historic highs. New research suggests that those who suffer periods of unemployment early in their careers pay a penalty in terms of lowered earnings decades into their careers.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy is calling the leadership of both parties in the General Assembly to meet him for talks on the state's budget crisis. 

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Hartford's development director has resigned amid an investigation into allegations the city was overbilled on a project to redevelop a soccer stadium. 

Americans collectively are losing billions of dollars a year out of their retirement accounts because they're paying excessive fees, according to researchers studying thousands of employer-sponsored retirement plans across the country.

The rearchers say part of the trouble is that many employers that offer 401(k) plans to their workers are outgunned by financial firms that sell them bad plans loaded with hefty fees. That's especially true, they say, for small and midsize employers that don't have much financial expertise in-house.

David DesRoches / WNPR

As a junior in high school, Michael Beale had a candy business that was pretty successful. But it wasn't exactly a school-sanctioned activity.

"Let's just say it was off the school's books," Beale said, speaking at a recent financial literacy event in East Hartford. Eventually the school shut down his black market sweets operation, but it didn't stop his desire to learn more about personal finance.

Four companies running urgent care centers in New York have agreed to disclose more fully which insurance plans they accept, following an inquiry by the state's attorney general that found unclear or incomplete information on their websites that could result in larger-than-expected bills for consumers.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

The president of Hartford's City Council is calling for the termination of the city's development director, after a deal to build a new professional soccer facility collapsed and the city apparently overpaid for work at Dillon Stadium.

Heather Brandon / WNPR

The plan to build a professional soccer stadium in Hartford is now officially dead, but the controversy around it isn't.

On Campus, Older Faculty Keep On Keepin' On

Oct 9, 2015

Ken Nickerson could have retired from his job as a professor of biological sciences at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln 10 years ago, when he turned 62.

He could have retired five years ago, when the university offered faculty a year's salary to step down as part of a buyout to encourage more of them to leave.

He could have retired last year, when, in yet another buyout offer, administrators dangled the equivalent of 90 percent of one full year's salary in front of faculty who would finally agree to go.

But Nickerson stayed.

Momoneymoproblemz / Creative Commons

General Electric Co. has established an energy company that combines its LED, solar, energy storage, and electric vehicle businesses and a software system to help customers improve efficiency. 

Thomas Autumn / Flickr Creative Commons

A recent New York Times op-ed drew attention to Yale University’s endowment and how the money is spent. The report found more was spent on private equity fund managers than to students. This has prompted renewed debate and criticism over big endowments at big schools. But the argument isn’t new. This hour, a conversation with higher education experts about the management of endowment money at the nation’s elite schools.

airbus777 / Creative Commons

The annual cost to operate Connecticut's bus-only system is rising as transit planners build out the route beyond its Hartford-to-New Britain corridor.

Back9Network flickr.com/back9network / Creative Commons

It was January 2012. The PGA golf association was hosting its merchandise show in Orlando, Florida – and the Back9Network was there.

Yale University / Creative Commons

Yale University reported that its endowment grew to a record high $25.6 billion based on an 11.5 percent return for the fiscal year that ended June 30.

DigiDreamGrafix.com / Creative Commons

Connecticut hospital executives are asking the General Assembly to intervene and prevent $63.4 million in new cuts to state Medicaid payments to their health care facilities.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut’s new budget is just three months old, but the Malloy administration has just announced that it must make emergency spending cuts. 

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The plan for a new stadium for the Pawtucket Red Sox in Providence has hit a roadblock. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay parses how this field of dreams turned into a nightmare.

epSos .de / flickr creative commons

Recently Yale economist Robert Shiller said in an essay in The New York Times that no one can say for certain what the stock market drop means. He did, however, say we'd all be right to exercise great caution now.

Harvard Law professor Lawrence Lessig met his self-imposed goal of crowdfunding $1 million by Labor Day, and Sunday on ABC announced he's running for the Democratic nomination for president.

Lessig, an activist with a grass-roots following among some progressives, says he's running on a singular platform — the Citizen Equality Act of 2017. It would expand voting access, ban gerrymandering and institute campaign finance reform.

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