film

Remembrance
8:44 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Mickey Rooney, Actor Who Charmed Audiences For More Than 80 Years, Dies

Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney put their heads together over a TV script for their first onstage reunion in 18 years in this 1963 photo.
AP

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 10:08 am

Mickey Rooney, the legendary actor who got his first Hollywood role at the age of 6 and starred in more than 200 films over the course of a turbulent career, has died. He was 93.

Charlene Rooney tells the Los Angeles Times that her father-in-law died of natural causes Sunday at the Los Angeles home he shared with her and her husband, Mark Rooney.

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Code Switch
7:06 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Who's Boosting Box Office Numbers? Report Says Latinos

Cesar Chavez pulled in $3 million at the box office last weekend and did noticeably better in areas where the farmworkers advocate was most active.
Courtesy of Lionsgate

According to a recent report published by the Motion Picture Association of America, Latinos went to the movies in 2013 way more often than other ethnic groups in the U.S. relative to their population.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
12:00 am
Fri March 28, 2014

The Nose Travels to the Grand Budapest Hotel

Gorman Bechard is a film director, screenwriter, and novelist.
Chion Wolf WNPR

A hilariously fussy hotel manager with a taste for the high life is wrenched from his gay surroundings by the specter of war and a false murder charge. That doesn't sound terribly funny, but it's the premise for "The Grand Budapest Hotel," the latest Wes Anderson movie. Our Nose panelists all went to see it, and it will be one of our topics on this show.

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Documentary
8:52 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

'Vivian Maier' Brings Nanny-Photographer's Life Into Focus

In their new documentary Finding Vivian Maier, John Maloof and Charlie Siskel profile a reclusive photographer and her undiscovered photo archive.
Vivian Maier Courtesy of IFC Films

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 11:53 am

Is an artist's life relevant to her reputation as an artist? Not so much, perhaps, but many of us want the bio anyway, especially when the artist in question is as tantalizingly elusive as Vivian Maier (or Mayer, or Meyer, as she variously spelled it to confound the curious), a reclusive Chicago nanny whose posthumously discovered trove of street photographs swelled into a cause celebre after her death in 2009.

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Code Switch
5:15 am
Sat March 22, 2014

They Cast Whom?! Actor Choices To Offend Every Racial Sensibility

From a mixed heritage, Adam Jacobs plays Aladdin in the Disney Broadway production of the same name.
Cylla von Tiedemann AP

Originally published on Sun March 23, 2014 12:48 pm

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Connecticut First
5:48 pm
Mon March 17, 2014

Testimony Given on Aid-in-Dying Bill; Drop in Hospital Revenue

The legislature's Public Health Committee heard testimony on a bill which would allow physicians to help terminally ill patients end their lives.  It's supported by an advocacy group called Compassion and Choices, which has spent thousands lobbying for the bill---while the Catholic Church, along with the Family Institute of Connecticut, have voiced strong opposition.

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Behind the Scenes
10:23 am
Wed March 5, 2014

A Psychological Game Of Casting For 'The Grand Budapest Hotel'

Ralph Fiennes portrays concierge Monsieur Gustave in The Grand Budapest Hotel, the actor' first project with director Wes Anderson.
Bob Yeoman Courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 9:34 am

Watching Wes Anderson's films can often feel like a tumble down a rabbit hole. With the opening credits comes entry into a world that's both weird and wonderful. The writer and director of movies like Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums and Moonrise Kingdom has long had a point of view that is completely original — even dating back to the fifth grade, when he and a friend dramatized a Kenny Rogers album.

"We built quite a nice set," Anderson recalls. "We just performed the whole album of The Gambler with puppets playing instruments."

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Academy Awards
6:58 pm
Sun March 2, 2014

'12 Years A Slave,' 'Gravity' Win Big At The Oscars

Red carpet's ready: The rope line awaits at Hollywood & Highland Center.
Christopher Polk Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 10:37 am

After several days of heavy rain in Los Angeles, the sun came out just as the 86th annual Academy Awards got underway at the Dolby Theater.

The big award of the night, for Best Picture, went to 12 Years a Slave. The film tells the harrowing tale of Solomon Northup, a free black man in New York who was sold into slavery. (See the full list of winners below.)

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Academy Awards
6:05 pm
Sun March 2, 2014

Oscar Spoiler Alert: What We Already Know About The Winners

Actress Lupita Nyong'o may very well win an Oscar Sunday night. And if she does, she will have gotten votes from people who can't be bothered to learn her name.
Gabriel Olsen Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 12:38 pm

Sunday night's Oscars will include a Best Picture race that's apparently narrowed to three films: 12 Years A Slave, Gravity, and maybe American Hustle. Matthew McConaughey for Best Actor? Maybe. Or Leonardo DiCaprio? What about Cate Blanchett, a seeming shoo-in despite Meryl Streep delivering, in August Osage County, the biggest, chewiest, most Oscar-friendly performance of all time?

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The Oscars
7:08 pm
Sat March 1, 2014

The Human Moments We Miss, Backstage At The Oscars

Every year, Entertainment Weekly writer Anthony Breznick covers the Oscars from behind the scenes.
Christopher Polk Getty Images

Picture this: You're standing on a stage. You're the center of attention in an auditorium filled with over 3,000 people. Roughly 40 million more are watching you on TV.

No, this isn't a nightmare — it's the Academy Awards. Every year, the standout members of the film industry are presented with Hollywood's highest honor: an Oscar.

But what happens after you've won the coveted gold statue? What does it feel like to walk away from the flashbulbs and fans, and step into the quiet darkness behind the curtains?

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The Faith Middleton Show
10:46 am
Thu February 27, 2014

Moments That Made the Movies

Credit Dennis Skley/flickr creative commons

Today's show originally aired January 7, 2014.

Note: The web version of today's show (posted all the way at the bottom here) includes full, unedited, and unexpurgated film clips (which include some adult language) and runs more than four minutes longer than the show we did live on the air in January.

From Faith Middleton: If you saw When Harry Met Sally…, there was a wry, riveting exchange between the two main characters, Meg Ryan and Billy Crystal, sitting at a restaurant table, causing an observing customer to say, "I'll have what she's having."

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:13 am
Wed February 26, 2014

Get the Popcorn. Take Your Seat. We're Talking Remakes

Sam Hatch is the "movie guy" for WWUH's Culture Dogs and the Damon Scott Show on WTIC
Chion Wolf

Remakes are easy. Money-makers are hard. We live in a sloshing sea of those movie remakes but it's rare for one of them to out gross the original. An exception, oddly enough, was the remake of "Clash of the Titans," which significantly outperformed its 80s predecessor. 

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Jazz Corridor
5:45 am
Wed February 12, 2014

Crooner Wade Visits Hartford

Adam Wade, now and then.
Credit Adam Wade/Orbit Records

Besides being the first African-American to host a network TV game show, the versatile crooner/actor Adam Wade has enjoyed a more than half-century career crowned by countless appearances on stage, screen, and television, and a glorious, too brief flurry of chart-busting recordings in the 1960s. Among his hit singles was his tuneful trifecta of romantic ballads in 1961, "Take Good Care of Her," "As If I Didn’t Know," and "The Writing on the Wall." 

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Loss of an Actor
7:06 pm
Sun February 2, 2014

Philip Seymour Hoffman: An 'Uncanny' Actor Of Stage And Screen

Hoffman (left) and Eddie Marsan, in a scene from the film God's Pocket, released in January.
Lance Acord AP

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 2:53 pm

Actor Philip Seymour Hoffman was found dead on Sunday in his Manhattan apartment. He was 46.

Hoffman was steeped in his profession — in film, on stage, in the spotlight and behind the scenes.

In 2005, he won the Oscar for best actor for his portrayal of Truman Capote. The movie focuses on Capote's interviews with two murderers on death row for his nonfiction novel In Cold Blood.

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News
2:39 pm
Sun February 2, 2014

Philip Seymour Hoffman, Oscar-Winner, Found Dead At 46

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 7:51 am

Actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, who won a best actor Oscar for the title role in the 2005 film Capote, was found dead in his Manhattan apartment at the age of 46.

A New York Police Department spokesman tells NPR that authorities are "investigating Hoffman's death as a possible drug overdose."

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Holocaust
2:06 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

Film Documents Children's Rescue From the Nazis -- and One Lives in Hartford

Ivan Backer, 84, a Hartford resident rescued by Sir Nicholas Winton during the Nazi takeover of Prague.
Chion Wolf WNPR

Next Monday marks the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, International Holocaust Remembrance Day. Next week in Woodbridge and Madison, there will be two screenings of the film "Nicky’s Family," a Czech documentary that tells the nearly-forgotten story of Sir Nicholas Winton, a British stockbroker who organized the rescue of 669 children just before start of World War II. 

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Host's Diary
10:44 am
Fri January 17, 2014

Why It Makes Even Less Sense Than Usual to Follow The Oscars This Year

It's not even a matter of "snubs."

This year's Oscar nominations got it so wrong as to make a reasonable debate about what happens, going forward, almost impossible.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:01 am
Fri January 17, 2014

The Nose Falls in Love With Its Operating System

James Hanley is the co-founder of Cinestudio at Trinity College.
Chion Wolf WNPR

The Nose panel went to the movies this week to see the critically-acclaimed Spike Jonze film, "Her," about a future world in which it's not unusual for a man to fall in love with his artificially-intelligent operating system. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:23 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Cinema Scuffle! With David Edelstein and A. O. Scott

Credit ToastyKen, Flickr Creative Commons

My two favorite film critics, A.O. Scott and David Edelstein, appear on the show today, and we've got a longer list of topics than we can possibly get to. I'm interested in the way a lot of the recent hit movies take little bites of our recent past: "Inside Llewyn Davis" tackles 1961. "American Hustle" bestrides the end of the 70s and beginning of the 80s. "The Wolf of Wall Street" started with the Crash of '87 and pans forward into the 1990s. Suddenly, for Baby Boomers, the stretch of our living memory is a series of period pieces and costume dramas.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:40 am
Fri December 27, 2013

The Nose Gets Inside Llewyn Davis

James Hanley is the co-founder of Cinestudio at Trinity College
Chion Wolf

The Nose panelists explore the hidden mysteries of the Coen Brothers' new film, Inside Llewyn Davis, based  on the early folk movement of 1960's Greenwich Village and one of its early pioneers, Dave Van Ronk. 

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Larger Than Life
8:03 am
Mon December 16, 2013

Peter O'Toole, Exuberant From 'Lawrence' To His Last Role

Peter O'Toole, the charismatic actor who achieved instant stardom as Lawrence of Arabia and was nominated eight times for an Academy Award, died Saturday. He was 81.
AP

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 10:35 am

Blond, blue-eyed and wearing blazing white robes in Lawrence Of Arabia, Peter O'Toole was handsome enough — many said beautiful enough — to carry off the scene in which director David Lean simultaneously made stars of both his title character and his leading man.

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Metro-North Derailment
9:15 am
Fri December 6, 2013

Time-Lapse Video Shows Track Repairs Underway

Credit Daniel Cohen

A time-lapse video created over two days shows the track repair work underway at the site of a Metro-North train derailment where four people died and 63 people were injured. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
4:38 pm
Wed October 16, 2013

America's Greatest Living Film Critics Round Up Fall Movies From "Gravity" to "Rush"

Sandra Bullock plays Ryan Stone, an astronaut stuck in space, in Alfonso Cuaron's "Gravity."
Credit Warner Bros.

Watching the movie "Captain Phillips" -- in which Tom Hanks plays a commercial freighter captain kidnapped by Somali pirates -- I had a sense of deja vu. Movies like this are becoming a type. They're about the interaction between the U.S. and people who don't like us. In "Zero Dark 30" and "Captain Phillips," a crack Seal team shows up, so much better equipped and trained than our adversaries that the whole thing feels like an overmatch.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
12:12 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

The Nose Goes to New Haven to Sniff Out the Poopetrator

Credit Vox Efx / Wikimedia Commons

We're in New Haven today, and The Nose, our weekly culture panel, wants to talk about the hazards of 3D movies and the increasingly competitive world of Halloween costumes. And because we're in New Haven, we'll turn our attention to a couple of prominent stories down here. One of them -- not for the squeamish -- is the Poopetrator, a laundry prankster who has created such a national stir that even the official account for Clorox bleach is tweeting about him.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
4:05 pm
Mon September 23, 2013

The Ebb & Flow Of Dada

Jeff Poole is a Connecticut artist, and curator of the Dada Art Show in Hartford, which opens this Thursday the 26th at the Pump House Gallery in Bushnell Park.
Chion Wolf

It's an art form that came out of the chaos of World War One, when times were desperate, yet the art world was still celebrating still lifes, landscapes and nudes. In protest, artists began rebelling with politically aware ironic work, making bold, sometimes vicious points with their art. Times have changed, and Dada resurfaces periodically, like in the exhibition at the Pump House in Hartford opening on the 26th.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:39 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

A Conversation with Eric Deggans on Race & Media

Eric Deggans, the author of Race-baiter: How the Media Wields Dangerous Words to Divide a Nation, and NPR's new television critic.
Credit Chion Wolf

You can read a lot into media depictions of minorities.

Richard Pryor was  hilarious at it. One time he said he had just seen a movie called "Logan's Run." It was set in the future, and there were no black characters in it. "That means white folks ain't planning for us to be there," he said.

Media critic Eric Deggans joins us today, and one of his major theses is that extremism and division make for a bad public discourse and great television. Big media, says Deggans, thrive on division and tension, whether it's on cable news shows or reality TV.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
5:46 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

In A World Of Voice Overs... "In A World" Is The Tip Of The Iceberg

Credit Chion Wolf

Thirteen years ago, I wrote an amusing but fairly ignorant op-ed piece for The New York Times triggered by watching a planetarium movie narrated by Tom Hanks. I wrote: "I miss the days of the anonymous, nobody-special narrator. Playing next door to Mr. Hanks at the museum was a Mount Everest Imax movie narrated by Liam Neeson. Take a cab to get there, and Isaac Hayes tells you to take your stuff when you get out, and don't forget your receipt." 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:43 am
Fri August 16, 2013

We're Going To the Drive-In!

monkeywing on Flickr Creative Commons

The drive-in movie theater turns 80 this summer. If you haven't been to one for a long time, you might be surprised at how much fun they are.

Here in Connecticut their numbers are shrinking--it's probably some combination of real estate prices, gas prices, the advent of home theaters, and the sheer economics of running any movie theater with fewer than 82 screens.

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