families

mangostock/iStock / Thinkstock

Foodshare distributes food to the Greater Hartford Region by partnering with local food pantries, soup kitchens, and emergency shelters. This week, its mobile truck has been delivering a product that's not usually available to families in need.

Concha García Hernández / Creative Commons

On average, there are 15 intimate partner homicides each year in Connecticut. That's just one statistic from the state domestic violence fatality review report, but another stat has startled prevention advocates into action.

With the approval of the Statehouse, same-sex marriages are one step away from being legal in Illinois.

The Chicago Tribune reports the bill received 61 votes, just one more than necessary to send the bill to the Senate, which is expected to pass it.

The House was the bill's biggest hurdle because Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn has said he would sign the bill into law.

The Tribune adds:

Addison Berry/flickr creative commons

From Faith Middleton: Great for Thanksgiving and eight other months of the year—Corn Bread Stuffing Muffins baked in a muffin tin. How about passing that around at your holiday table? I found this recipe in the November issue of Cooking Light magazine, and had to give it a whirl.

Call it a linguistic identity crisis.

Growing up in Westchester, N.Y., 25-year-old Danielle Alvarez says, she and her two siblings didn't have much need for Spanish. With few other Hispanic families around, she got by with the few phrases she had picked up from her Mexican-born father: good night, put a coat on, be careful.

Kristin Wall/flickr creative commons

by Faith Middleton

This simple, flavorful spice rub is one of my favorites, and will transform your roast turkey as it cooks sitting atop a bed of fresh rosemary sprigs. The best part is that you can make the rub ahead, then freeze it or store it for when you need it.

Mackenzie Kreitler / Verizon Wireless

The Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence received a grant form the Verizon Foundation Friday that will train Health Care providers to become effective domestic violence screeners.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The Wheelhouse Digest today turns to family matters as we recover from a recent overdose of political craziness. Two brothers from Connecticut visited WNPR to talk about a unique book of photographs to be released on October 30. And Newtown resident Jimmy Greene talked with The New York Times about grieving for the loss of his daughter by continuing his work as a musician. That and more below.

Christopher Capozziello / From "The Distance Between Us"

Photographer Christopher Capozziello has been photographing his twin brother Nick for as long as he's been a photographer. Despite being twins, there was something between them: Nick was born with cerebral palsy. Chris was not. 

John Walker / Flickr Creative Commons

The transition from high school to college is tough for anyone. But if you’re the first in your family to go to school, you’re a trailblazer and have a whole other set of challenges. From knowledge of the college application process, to financial aid, to campus life, there are more hurdles to get past when you’re the first to go through it.

On this episode of Where We Live we’re joined by a panel of first-generation college students, both past and present to share their stories. Are you a first-generation college student? We want to hear your story!

Robyn Lee/flickr creative commons

by Faith Middleton

If your schedule is rushed, have we got a cookbook for you! The Good-to-Go collection of about 300 recipes is a winner with adults and children. It's also the perfect cookbook for transitioning kids in a first apartment, or for kids in college.

The Connecticut Mirror

Raymond Mancuso, the court monitor who oversees progress at Connecticut's Department of Children and Families, in a recent report said the agency is making improvements, and is moving toward an end to court oversight -- with one glaring exception. 

flowercarole/flickr creative commons

by Faith Middleton  

Here's the mission—to inspire kids to cook and eat real food with their families. And we have the recipes to help you do just that. From French toast to frittatas, chicken soup to classic burgers, banana-peach frozen yogurt to mango lassis. 

Editor's Note: This post is part of All Things Considered's Found Recipes project.

Although Heinz may dominate the ketchup scene, 100 years ago it wasn't uncommon to make your own at home. So why bother doing so now, when you can just buy the bottles off the shelf? At least one man, Jim Ledvinka, was motivated by nostalgia.

"Oh, yes — we remember my grandmother making ketchup. And it was quite a sight to behold," Ledvinka says.

William Wootton/flickr creative commons

Why do grownups and kids fight about food? Is there a way around it? I talk with New Haven psychologist Dr. Nancy Horn about re-framing the food fight strategy. Maybe you've had a food fight… or two million. No? Think about it…

Lucy Nalpathanchil

The last person a struggling parent wants to see at his or her door is a worker from the state Department of Children and Families.  Years of adversarial relationships with families have contributed to the troubled agency's reputation.  In the last year, DCF has adopted a reform that turns the old way of doing things on its head.

Amy DeRosa is a 36 year old mom with two children. She's a pretty positive person despite life handing her one challenge after another.

Kudumomo on Flickr Creative Commons

Piper Kerman brought a suitcase of cash across international borders as the 20-year-old girlfriend of an international drug trafficker.

By the time she was 34, Piper outgrew her need for adventure, but not the crime that landed her in prison more than a decade later, despite that she was living a respectable life with a boyfriend, family, and artisanal soap business in New York City's West Village.

Lucy Nalpathanchil

The last person a struggling parent wants to see at his or her door is a worker from the state Department of Children and Families. Years of adversarial relationships with families have contributed to the troubled agency's reputation. Now, as WNPR’s Lucy Nalpathanchil reports, DCF has adopted a reform that turns the old way of doing things on its head.

Amy DeRosa is a 36 year-old mom with two children. She's a pretty positive person despite life handing her one challenge after another

Sunsetme on Flickr Creative Commons

Today, we’re talking about the changing face of fatherhood.

While the birth of most children don’t get as much attention as the arrival of the royal baby, many of us already know what Prince William has yet to learn, this is just the start.

Of course, he’ll have a little help raising his young son--something a lot of dads don’t have. A recent series of reports from the Pew Center on Social and Demographic Trends say that in the United States, single father households are rising.

Fast-Forward Family

Jul 22, 2013
Barbara Wells/flickr creative commons

Tim Parkinson on Flickr Creative Commons

When Americans get older, two things often happen.

Some are forced into a life where everyone around them is the same age, in an assisted living community when they become reliant on others for their care.

Others choose this life, retirement to the South, in a community of active seniors with no kids allowed.

But what’s the impact of this kind of social isolation from those of other ages?  What benefits are they missing?

Chion Wolf

Advocates of same-sex marriage in Connecticut are celebrating the Supreme Court ruling that strikes down the federal Defense of Marriage Act and California's Proposition 8. Both banned gay marriage.

Beth Kerrigan was the lead plaintiff in the Kerrigan v. The State of Connecticut, a case that struck down a Connecticut law banning same-sex marriage,

Kerrigan says she is "overwhelmed" and "ecstatic" about the ruling.

She says with the Supreme Court ruling, her marriage to Jody Mock means a lot more now, than it did earlier this week.

CT Mirror (ctmirror.org)

Mike Lawlor got married over the weekend.

And while the state of Connecticut recognized his marriage to his husband, the federal government did not.  Until today.

I spoke with Lawlor as he sat on a park bench across from the Stonewall Inn in Manhattan minutes after the U.S. Supreme Court rulings were read.  

If you can't catch the whole story, here's what you need to hear:

Diane Orson

The US Supreme Court still has to rule on several major cases before the end of the term. Same-sex couples across the country are waiting for a decision on The Defense of Marriage Act, or DOMA.  A report now on how the DOMA ruling may affect one Connecticut family.

Under Connecticut law, same-sex couples can marry and adopt children.  But under DOMA and in the eyes of the federal government same sex marriage is not valid.

"This is my room, the best room in the house because I sleep in it!"

As Father’s Day approaches, many kids are making plans to spend special time with their dads. But some Connecticut young people will be far away from their fathers.  A surge in deportations under the Obama administration has affected tens of thousands of American kids. WNPR brings you the story of a Norwalk teenager whose dad was removed to Colombia two years ago.

"It all started when I was in 8th grade. I was 13 years old. We were in New York and my dad got a phone call from a neighbor saying that a police officer was looking for him."

Tony Bacewicz/C-HIT

Ten-year-old Joey Smith shared a celebratory high-five with Heather Kunkel, a mental health professional who was visiting the boy’s Thomaston home. “Things are great, spectacular even,” he said, as the two chatted at the kitchen table.

It’s a dramatic turnaround for Joey who met Kunkel when she was summoned to Thomaston Center School because he had threatened to harm himself. Now Joey, who has autism, is back at school with a modified curriculum to suit his individual needs and his parents have access to an educational advocate and community resources.

Tony Bacewicz/C-HIT

Ten-year-old Joey Smith shared a celebratory high-five with Heather Kunkel, a mental health professional who was visiting the boy’s Thomaston home. “Things are great, spectacular even,” he said, as the two chatted at the kitchen table.

It’s a dramatic turnaround for Joey who met Kunkel when she was summoned to Thomaston Center School because he had threatened to harm himself. Now Joey, who has autism, is back at school with a modified curriculum to suit his individual needs and his parents have access to an educational advocate and community resources.

May is Foster Care Awareness Month, and as WNPR's Ray Hardman reports, advocates are pushing to extend foster care from 18 to 21 years old.

Photo courtesy of Flickr CC by Adkp

Waterbury police are collaborating with mental health professionals in a pilot program that aims to reduce traumatic stress in children.  As WNPRs Lucy Nalpathanchil reports, the program is meant to provide support to children after the arrest of a parent or caregiver.

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