German comedian Jan Boehmermann could face jail time for reading a satirical, obscene poem on German TV that criticized Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

Chancellor Angela Merkel told reporters on Friday that Germany's government will allow a criminal investigation against Boehmermann to move forward, stoking criticism that her decision undermines free speech.

A German train dispatcher was playing a game on his cellphone shortly before he misdirected two trains, causing a head-on collision that killed 11 people, according to prosecutors.

The dispatcher may face charges of negligent homicide, according to Reuters and The Associated Press — though he insists he was not distracted by the game.

Michael Kerswill / Flickr

History and literature are filled with their antics. From the Renaissance's Triboulet to Shakespeare's Feste from "Twelfth Night," jesters and fools have delighted us for centuries with their subversive humor and quick wit. But while comedy was their brand, there existed hardships for these characters as well.

Nearly five months after a "wanted" bulletin tied him to the Paris terrorist attacks, Mohamed Abrini has been arrested in Belgium. Public broadcaster RTBF also says Abrini may be the "man in the hat" wanted in connection to last month's bombings in Brussels.

Acid Pix / Creative Commons

It’s the time of year when many schools offer student trips that involve international travel. With the terror attacks in Brussels and Paris, and concerns about student safety, some school leaders in Connecticut have had to make hard choices about whether to move forward with their travel plans.

Updated at 8:10 p.m. ET

Icelandic Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson said Tuesday that he will step aside and another party official will take over for a while. The move comes days after a massive data leak known as the Panama Papers linked him to secret offshore bank accounts.

Following news that Gunnlaugsson had resigned, a spokesperson released a statement clarifying the leader's decision:

Sweden has taken in more asylum seekers per capita than any other European country — 160,000 last year alone. Refugees are now part of the landscape, even in small towns. And nearly everybody, not just those working with aid groups, is encountering the newcomers.

In the southern town of Ronneby, Dagmar Nordberg is giving Swedish lessons to Waliullah Hafiz, who goes by Wali, at her kitchen table. The 60-year-old Swedish museum director met this 23-year-old migrant from Kabul on a train platform in a nearby village on a freezing cold day last November.

The first boats of refugees and migrants have arrived back in Turkey from Greece, as part of a new — and controversial — deal between Turkey and the European Union that takes effect today. It is aimed at stopping the flood of people seeking asylum in Europe.

Under the deal, every migrant who reaches Greece illegally from Turkey after March 20 will be returned to Turkey, unless they qualify for asylum. However, for every Syrian turned back, a Syrian refugee who has been vetted is to be resettled from Turkey in an EU country.

Acid Pix / Creative Commons

A Connecticut high school is canceling a class trip to Germany and Austria because of security concerns following bombings in Belgium.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry says that Americans were among those killed in Tuesday's terrorist attacks in Belgium's capital, which killed at least 31 people and injured hundreds more.

Speaking in Brussels on Friday, Kerry said he was grieving with "the loved ones of those who have been very cruelly taken from us — including Americans."

The director of the State Department Press Office has since specified that two U.S. citizens were killed in the attacks.

It's the first confirmation of American deaths in the attacks.

Authorities have identified a third suspected suicide bomber in the terrorist attacks on Brussels this week.

A Belgian federal prosecutor's statement says the person seen on the left in a widely circulated surveillance footage still, previously identified as a suspected attacker, is 24-year-old Najim Laachraoui.

A day after terrorist attacks in Brussels claimed by ISIS killed at least 31 people and wounded at least 270 others, police continue to search for a suspected accomplice.

The man in question, wearing a hat and light-colored jacket, was seen with two suspected suicide bombers on closed-circuit TV at the Brussels airport Tuesday morning, shortly before two explosions went off at the airport and one bomb was set off at a metro station.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

U.S. Senator Chris Murphy said Tuesday’s deadly attacks in Brussels underscore the need for European leaders to take a hard look at whether their law enforcement and anti-terrorism operations can meet the true threat on the continent.

More than 30 people are dead and more than 200 wounded after explosions struck Brussels during the Tuesday morning rush hour, Belgian officials say. Two blasts hit the international airport; another struck a metro station. Belgium issued a Level 4 alert, denoting "serious and imminent attack."

The terrorist attacks in Brussels mark the third major assault in the heart of Europe in just over a year and raise a troubling question: Are European states prepared to deal with a sustained onslaught?

The satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo was hit in January 2015. Terrorists rampaged through Paris again in November. And now, Brussels has suffered bomb attacks at the airport and the subway, claiming more than 30 lives.

After terrorist attacks in Brussels on Tuesday morning that killed more than 30 people and wounded more than 200, American politicians took to social media and TV news programs to respond to the violence.

Several pointed to the attacks as a reason to focus America's fight against Islamic extremism.

We're compiling responses from elected officials and presidential candidates here:

Before she was a writer, Sara Baume set out to be a visual artist.

"First and foremost I see; I see the world and then I describe it ..." she says. "I don't know another way to write. I always anchor everything in an image."

Baume's process works — a review in The Irish Times called her debut novel a "stunning and wonderful achievement by a writer touched by greatness."

Baume loves words, and she loves fitting words together so they flow like poetry.

Police killed one suspect during an anti-terror raid in Belgium thought to be linked to last November's Paris attacks. The raid, led by French and Belgian police, turned into a standoff with suspects inside the apartment. During the operation, in which there were at least three bursts of gunfire, four officers were wounded.

Police killed "an unidentified individual wielding a Kalashnikov — a gun used by some of the Islamic State militants in Paris," Reuters reports.

After overwhelmingly approving new reform measures, FIFA members have narrowly elected Gianni Infantino of Switzerland as their next president.

The first round of voting wasn't decisive — while Infantino, general secretary of Europe's UEFA soccer organization, edged out Sheikh Salman of Bahrain, the favorite leading into the election, neither reached the required two-thirds majority of the 207 votes.

In the second round of voting, which only required a simple majority, Infantino took home 115 votes.

Feryal Salem

The 2016 presidential race has been loaded with rhetoric about a so-called “ISIS caliphate." But what exactly is a caliphate? And what does it mean to say that ISIS has one? This hour, local Islamic scholar Dr. Feryal Salem fills us in. 

Beth Cortez-Neavel / Creative Commons

When was the last time you sent a letter? Not an email, but a real, tangible piece of mail? If your answer is "not recently," you’re not alone.

Except for the occasional birthday or holiday card, most of us haven’t sent -- or received -- good, old-fashioned snail mail in a very long time. 

Same-sex marriage or civil unions are legal throughout Western Europe, including many traditionally Catholic countries. The last holdout is Italy, where the Senate is about to take up a bill on Thursday that would legalize civil unions — though it would not authorize gay marriage.

Tens of thousands of Italians took to the streets last weekend in some 100 cities demanding legalization of civil unions, including those of gay and lesbian couples.

"Italy, it's time to wake up," they shouted.

At least 10 people are dead and more than a dozen wounded after an explosion struck a historic district in Istanbul on Tuesday morning. Civilians and tourists are among the victims from what officials say was a suicide blast in Sultanahmet Square, site of the famed Blue Mosque.

After the blast, speculation immediately began to fly over who might be responsible. Many fingers pointed at ISIS because of the apparent target — a historic cultural area that's popular with tourists.

Britain's most iconic steam engine roared back to life Friday, after more than a decade of renovation work.

The Flying Scotsman — the first train to reach 100 miles per hour, back in 1934 — was pulled out of service in 1963. Now it's coming back, Reuters reports:

"The venerable engine, which has toured both the United States and Australia since it was retired from service, made a series of short test runs on Friday, ahead of a programme of heritage journeys this year on Britain's main lines.

Pierre Boulez, the French composer and conductor whose career spanned from the avant-garde post-World War II era to the computer age, has died, according to the French culture ministry. He was 90. Boulez famously challenged his peers and his audience to rethink their ideas of sound and harmony.

A series of house raids in Belgium have put six people in custody who are suspected of being involved with a plot to carry out a terrorist attack during New Year's Eve celebrations in Brussels.

The development comes days after police in Brussels arrested two people who were suspected of planning the New Year's Eve attack; despite those arrests, the city has canceled plans for its annual fireworks show.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A documentary airing Thursday night on CPTV tells the story of American soldiers stationed in Luxembourg during World War II who, without realizing it, helped to create a new holiday tradition. 

In what supporters are calling a historic achievement, 196 nations attending the COP21 climate meetings outside Paris voted to adopt an agreement Saturday that covers both developed and developing countries. Their respective governments will now need to adopt the deal.

Lindsay Zier-Vogel / The Love Lettering Project

When was the last time you sent a letter? Not an email, but a real, tangible piece of mail? If your answer is "not recently," you’re not alone.

Except for the occasional birthday or holiday card, most of us haven’t sent -- or received -- good, old-fashioned snail mail in a very long time.