"I actually think we're going to solve this thing."

That's what President Obama said in a news conference just before he left a United Nations summit on climate change.

"Climate change is a massive problem," Obama said. "It is a generational problem. It's a problem that by definition is just about the hardest thing for a political system to absorb, because the effects are gradual, they're diffused. And yet despite all that ... I'm optimistic. I think we're going to solve it."

The Obama administration has announced some changes to the visa waiver program, which allows travelers from some 38 countries including France, Belgium and other European countries, to come to the U.S. without a visa.

The White House announced several steps, including attempting better tracking of past travel, fines for airlines that don't verify passport data, assisting other countries on the screening of refugees and with border security.

Nearly 150 world leaders are gathered near Paris for what is being billed as a last-chance summit to avoid catastrophic climate change.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports that this is the biggest diplomatic meeting in France since 1948. She filed this report for our Newscast unit:

France paid homage today to those who died in terrorist attacks in Paris two weeks ago. The names of the 130 people killed were read at a national memorial service at a historic military building in Paris called Les Invalides.

President Francois Hollande delivered a speech, saying France would continue to defend the values for which the victims were killed.

Four days after security levels were raised over a possible terrorist attack, the Belgian capital remains on high alert — but schools, businesses and subway stations are reopening to the public.

Police and soldiers were standing guard as life in Brussels returns to something like normal, reports NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton:

President Obama and French President François Hollande promised to increase cooperation and expand attacks against the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.

During a joint press conference with Hollande at the White House, Obama said that the United States and France "owe our freedom to each other."

After the Paris attacks, Obama said, "our hearts broke too."

"In that stadium, concert hall, restaurants and cafes we see our own," Obama said. "Today we stand with you."

Brussels will remain in a heightened state of security until at least Monday, the country's prime minister Charles Michel said.

Schools and universities will reopen Wednesday and the subway system will begin reopening on Wednesday too. Still, said Michel, the country is still facing a "serious and imminent" threat.

Since Sunday, authorities have been carrying out raids in an attempt to stop what they suspect is planned Paris-style terrorist attack on Belgium's capital city.

Belgian prosecutors say they have arrested 16 people in raids Sunday night, after the city of Brussels spent the second day in a row on high alert.

Twenty-two raids were mounted, the prosecutors said — most in Brussels, and several south of the city. No explosives or firearms were recovered in the arrests, prosecutors say, and fugitive Salah Abdeslam, a suspect in the Paris attacks, was not among those arrested.

Paris Death Toll Continues To Climb

Nov 20, 2015

French Prime Minister Manuel Valls told the French Senate that the death toll from last week's massacre in Paris had risen by one, to 130 people. Hundreds were also wounded.

The count does not include any of the attackers who died. Earlier today, the prosecutor's office in Paris confirmed the body of a woman is among three bodies found in the wreckage of Wednesday's police raid of an apartment in the Paris suburb of St. Denis.

The suspected architect of the Paris attacks was killed during a violent police raid conducted by French authorities in the Paris suburb of Saint-Denis on Wednesday, French authorities say.

Abdelhamid Abaaoud was a Belgian national in his late 20s. Authorities believe that Abaaoud was close to Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al Baghdadi.

During a press conference, Minister of the Interior Bernard Cazeneuve said that Abaaoud was believed to be responsible for planning many of the Islamic State attacks in Europe.

In the wake of the terror attacks in Paris, a group of local Muslim women gathered in Copley Square Wednesday to mourn the victims.

About two dozen women gathered for what organizers called a “silent vigil” near the steps of the Boston Public Library in Copley Square. They stood in a line, quietly, carrying red roses and signs with messages like “Love trumps evil,” “Pray for the world” and “Spread hope.”

When the French nuclear aircraft carrier Charles de Gaulle reaches its position near Syria's coast, it will find what until recently might have seemed an unlikely ally: a Russian guided missile cruiser. A U.S. official says Russia is newly receptive to cooperation in Syria.

A huge and violent police operation in the Saint-Denis suburb of Paris is over. At least two people are dead and eight people were arrested, in an operation that authorities say stopped a terrorist cell that could have attacked again.

According to François Molins, chief prosecutor of France, Abdelhamid Abaaoud, who police believe orchestrated the attacks on Paris, may have been in one of the apartments targeted by the raid.

Courtesy Travelers

People who live or work in Hartford may have noticed last night a visible sign of solidarity with the French people after the Paris attacks.

The lights of the Travelers Tower on Grove Street flashed blue, white and red as a mark of respect, after last Friday's terror attacks which claimed the lives of 129 people.

France and England played their friendly match at London's Wembley Stadium as scheduled Tuesday night, with England winning 2-0, but other soccer matches in Europe were canceled over security concerns.

NPR's Newscast reported that in Hanover, Germany, officials citing "concrete information" about a possible terrorist plot canceled the game between Germany and the Netherlands hours before it was supposed to begin and evacuated anyone already in the stadium.

On the final day of national mourning, Paris is still trying to regain a sense of normalcy, after a series of coordinated terrorist attacks Friday left 129 people dead.

It's hard, NPR's David Greene reports. For example, he met 23-year-old Anne Sophie Pratta, who was making her way back to her apartment Monday night.

She said when she got on the train, everyone was looking at each other.

French authorities have zeroed in on two men they believe were responsible for planning and launching the terrorist attacks in Paris that left at least 129 people dead.

Citing two sources close to the investigation in Paris, NPR's Dina Temple-Raston reports that officials believe Salim Benghalem, a French national who joined ISIS several years ago, directed Abdelhamid Abaaoud, an ISIS deputy and a Belgian national, to orchestrate Friday's rampage. The two men are believed to be in Syria.

Over the weekend, I watched as crowds in the hundreds gathered in Paris' 10th arrondissement at the killing sites: a few neighborhood bistros like Le Carillon, and a Cambodian restaurant, Le Petit Cambodge — Little Cambodia.

The crowds moved quietly, like museumgoers, as they observed the memorial bouquets and candles or added to them with a hushed reverence.

There are bullet holes in the windows and walls, and the scenes of disorder inside were evidence of the chaos Friday night: beer glasses, still full, on the bar. A single shoe on the floor. Shards of glass.

A crowd gathered on Boston Common early Sunday afternoon to express their support of and solidarity with the people of France following Friday’s deadly attacks in Paris.

Christiaan Triebert / Creative Commons

The Paris bombings and shootings are the latest in a string of attacks by the Islamic State. Mourners around the world have gathered to show support for the victims and world leaders are responding politically and militarily. This hour, national security expert and Connecticut native Scott Bates discusses what the appropriate response should be.

We also hear from a University of Connecticut student responding to racist graffiti on his friend Mahmoud's door.

Updated 4:25 a.m. ET Monday:

French Prime Minister Manuel Valls tells French radio RTL that there have been more than 150 raids throughout the night in France. More are expected.

Sunday's post:

As France observed its first of three days of national mourning, police said they were looking for a suspect who they believe may have been involved in the coordinated attacks that left scores dead in Paris on Friday.

The terrorist attacks in Paris on Friday could be an early harbinger of a new, more professional kind of terrorist attack leveled against the West.

In the past, al-Qaida depended on violent jihadis showing up in Pakistan or Yemen with a passport or visa that would allow them to return to home. The group would train them and send them back. Counter-terrorism officials are concerned that ISIS has taken that a step further by sending battle-hardened fighters to do their dirty work.

In the wake of Friday's coordinated terrorist attacks in Paris, the French people — and supporters around the world — have been grieving. More than 120 people died in explosions and gunfire when well-coordinated teams of assailants struck at least six sites across the city.

On Friday, coordinated terrorist attacks struck the French capital, killing more than 120 people.

Deadly attacks hit multiple sites simultaneously. There were explosions outside a massive stadium. Scores of people were held hostage inside a concert venue. Diners at several cafes and restaurants faced volleys of gunfire.

The incident has prompted anger, grief and an outpouring of sympathy from around the world.

Updated at 12:10 p.m. ET

Paris is largely shut down Saturday, as investigators work to identify those behind Friday night's coordinated terror attacks, which killed 129 people and wounded more than 350. The Eiffel Tower and other public gathering spaces are closed.

Paris Attacks: What We Know On Saturday

Nov 14, 2015
Updated at 9:30 p.m. ET

As Paris assesses the full toll of Friday night's terrorist attacks that hit six locations in and around the city, here's what we know so far:

The Victims

The attacks that began around 9:20 p.m. local time killed 129 people, French officials say, and left at least 352 more wounded — with 99 of them in critical condition. The victims were attacked at several sites across the French capital:

Updated at 1:22 a.m. ET

In the wake of controversy of any kind, even terrorist attacks, U.S. politics is never far behind. The American political response — from President Obama to the candidates vying to replace him — in the hours following the Paris attacks has been unsurprisingly split along party lines.

What is interesting, however, is that Democrats, who are set to debate Saturday night, have kept their responses generally to thoughts and prayers — with little in the way of policy prescriptions.

Updated 11:29 p.m. ET

Paris prosecutor Francois Molins says there have been six attacks in and around the city, and the death toll could exceed 120. The majority of those killed were in a concert hall.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports that French police stormed and took control of a concert hall, and two attackers there were killed. Molins says at least five attackers in total have been killed.

Ben Lieu Song / Creative Commons

Updated information can be found here.

A Paris police official said there were at least 100 hostages in a Paris theater following shooting and explosions at two cites in the city. Multiple officials, including one medical official, put the number of dead at between 35 to 40 people.

After a 15-month probe, investigators with the Dutch Safety Board have concluded that a Russian Buk missile took down Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in eastern Ukraine last year.

The crash in July 2014 killed all 298 people on board, most of whom were from the Netherlands.