WNPR

ethics

Animal Rights

Jul 5, 2011
Mike Baird

Michael Vick is once again a star in the Nike universe - only a few years after serving time for his role in a dog-fighting ring.

In The Liar in Your Life, psychology professor Robert Feldman, one of the world's leading authorities on deception, draws on his immense body of knowledge to give fresh insights into how and why we lie, how our culture has become increasingly tolerant of deception, the cost it exacts on us, and what to do about it. His work is at once surprising and sobering, full of corrections for common myths and explanations of pervasive oversimplifications. 

W.W. Norton, publishers

A 24-hour news cycle, media moguls with political agendas, blurred lines between news and commentary. To many, these are sign’s that today’s media couldn’t be farther removed from the integrity of its roots.

After more than two decades reporting on the Media, NPR’s Brooke Gladstone is of the opinion that we’ve been here before, and it’s actually been worse. Gladstone presents her manifesto in the new book The Influencing Machine.

Campaign Finance

Mar 28, 2011

In just a few hours the US Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in an Arizona case that may affect Connecticut's public campaign finance system.  We talk to Deirdre Shesgreen of the Connecticut Mirror about her recent article.

clip art

The Bridgeport Mayor's Election  Advisory Panel released a report today (Thursday) detailing dozens of recommendations to change how Connecticut runs its elections. The proposal is meant to restore trust in the system after Bridgeport's infamous failure to order enough ballots during last November's elections.

One recommendation allows Secretary of the State Denise Merrill to recommend how many ballots a town should order.  And, after review, it could allow her to force the town to order enough ballots for all of the town's registered voters.  

Andres Rueda, Creative Commons

Flickr Creative Commons, Tim Green aka atoach

A recent round of questions about conflicts of interest in the U.S. Supreme Court may place all three branches of government on a collision course.

Flickr Creative Commons, Sam Howzit

Until recently, I didn't understand the degree to which Connecticut jury selection process -- called the voir dire -- differs from those of other states.

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