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equality

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Coming up: We sit down with Chuck Collins, senior scholar at the Washington, D.C.-based Institute for Policy Studies.

But first: A look at how researchers are working to preserve the world's most endangered languages -- including locally-based efforts to expand fluency of the Mohegan language

Updated at 6:25 p.m. ET

Edith Windsor loved Thea Spyer. For nearly half a century, the two were partners and eventually were legally married as well. When Spyer died in 2009, though, the federal government didn't recognize that love on Windsor's tax forms, expecting her to pay more than $350,000 in estate taxes.

Raffaele Pagani / Flickr

Perhaps the most surprising thing about the Amazons of ancient Greek mythology is that they were not entirely mythical. While many of the deeds and details ascribed to these women warriors were imagined, the Amazons themselves were inspired by a real-life horse-riding tribe of nomads called the Scythians.

Em Lansey / Flickr

According to mytho-historical accounts, the ancient Amazons wore pants while riding into battle. But the trend this tribe of warrior women set was short lived. For nearly two millennia after their demise, the notion of women wearing pants was steeped in controversy.

ACLU

A police officer has filed suit against the town of Cromwell, claiming her rights were violated when her employer refused to modify her job duties while she was pregnant. 

The U.S. Army / Creative Commons

The White House has issued a memo that bans transgender people from enlisting in the military.

Helge V. Keitel / Creative Commons

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, an estimated 56 percent of women will be employed or looking for work by the year 2024 -- that's a nearly one percent decrease from 2015.

Still, investment in female leadership has grown at some workplaces -- including Connecticut-based United Technologies Corporation.

Femunity / flickr creative commons

As the men of Apollo 11 returned home to ticker tape parades, the women who made their journey possible worked quietly behind the scenes. Since its founding in 1958, NASA has been heavily reliant on the skills of such women, many of whom have gone unrecognized for their bravery and hard work.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Hate drives people to do unspeakable things but how often do these stories end in forgiveness and friendship?

This hour, Ted Hakey Jr. and Zahir Mannan join us. The two men met after Hakey shot his rifle into Mannan’s place of worship — the Ahmaddiya Baitul Amman Mosque in Meriden in 2015.

Updated at 4:30 p.m. ET

President Trump has announced that the government will not allow transgender people to serve in the U.S. military, a year after the Pentagon lifted its ban on transgender service members.

In a series of tweets on Wednesday morning, he wrote:

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Justice for all? Or justice for the privileged?

This hour, we hear how one Connecticut-based incubator is helping vulnerable residents gain access to counsel. We also examine more wide-ranging efforts to narrow the country’s “justice gap.” 

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Chuck Collins is a senior scholar at the Institute for Policy Studies. He's also an author, an editor, and a child of the so-called “one percent."

This hour, we sit down with Collins. We talk about his latest book and preview his upcoming appearance in Winsted, Connecticut. 

kaboompics.com

Efforts on the state level to introduce paid family leave are critical to overcoming gender equity problems in the workforce, according to advocates.

Helge V. Keitel / Creative Commons

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, an estimated 56 percent of women will be employed or looking for work by the year 2024 -- that's a nearly one percent decrease from 2015.

Still, investment in female leadership has grown at some workplaces -- including Connecticut-based United Technologies Corporation.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It’s been nearly 50 years since a US Supreme Court decision put an end to state laws banning interracial marriage.

This hour, we learn about the civil rights case, Loving v. Virginia. Have society’s perceptions really changed from that landmark decision in 1967?

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