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environment

Chion Wolf / WNPR

President Donald Trump's executive order to review and possibly roll back the Clean Power Plan is drawing response from attorneys general in several states -- including Connecticut.

Stop and Shop

Each year billions of pounds of food go to waste. That means billions of dollars, too. The Environmental Protection Agency says more food reaches landfills and incinerators than any other one material in our trash. And for supermarkets, that leftover food equates to lost dollars.

President Trump signed a sweeping executive order Tuesday that takes aim at a number of his predecessor's climate policies.

The wide-ranging order seeks to undo the centerpiece of former President Obama's environmental legacy and national efforts to address climate change.

It could also jeopardize America's current role in international efforts to confront climate change.

In a symbolic gesture, Trump signed the document at the headquarters of Environmental Protection Agency.

ED YOURDON / Creative Commons

The Trump administration is proposing a 31 percent cut to the Environmental Protection Agency’s budget. That would be the biggest cut of any federal agency.

Anthony Quintano / Creative Commons

When you think of evolution, you might picture the classic textbook illustration "March of Progress" by Rudolph Zallinger. It shows how, over 25 million years, our human ancestors slowly transform from hunched apes into modern homo sapiens. But now, thanks in part to roads and highways, lots of evolution happens much quicker than that.

Millstone Power Station

A bill that could change the way Connecticut's only nuclear power plant sells its energy is taking shape at the state capitol. Officials at Millstone Power Station are asking legislators to let them sell electricity directly to utilities.

AnneCN / Creative Commons

Tuesday’s winter storm packed a punch -- bringing some much-needed precipitation to Connecticut.

But was the wet weather enough to hoist the state out of a long-running drought? This hour, we find out and ask whether the region can expect to see consistent dry spells. 

pj_vanf / Creative Commons

Changes to Connecticut's "bottle bill" continue to be discussed by lawmakers. The debate centers around whether a recycling system developed decades ago is still viable.

Dave Sizer / Creative Commons

Legislators in Hartford are considering a state-wide "carbon tax" on fossil fuels, which could impact utility customers, car drivers, and businesses in the state.

Members of American Indian tribes, indigenous communities and their supporters are demonstrating today in Washington, D.C., calling on the Trump administration to meet with tribal leaders and protesting the construction of the nearly complete Dakota Access Pipeline.

The protest is partly led by the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, which has been battling the federal government for more than a year over an oil pipeline that members say endangers their drinking water and has destroyed sacred sites in North Dakota.

NOAA

Connecticut Sea Grant supports a wide range of environmental and educational activities in Connecticut, but could be eliminated under President Donald Trump's budget.

President Trump's head of the Environmental Protection Agency says he does not believe that carbon dioxide is a major cause of global warming.

"I would not agree that [CO2] is a primary contributor to the global warming that we see," Scott Pruitt said Thursday in an interview with CNBC's Joe Kernen.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Environmental advocates are asking legislators to support a measure amending the state constitution. The move would require a public hearing and a two-thirds vote in both the House and Senate, whenever the state legislature wants to give away, swap, or sell public land.

Michael Ching / Creative Commons

President Donald Trump claimed former President Barack Obama wiretapped Trump Tower during the 2016 presidential campaign in a series of tweets Saturday morning. 

Creative Commons / Community College of Vermont

Former Vermont Governor Pete Shumlin recently visited Wesleyan University to reflect on his career and discuss ways to combat climate change.

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