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environment

An ancient fish still swims in Lake Champlain. Biologists and anglers are seeing more giant, long-lived lake sturgeon here, even as an environmental group calls for greater protection for the species around the country.

FuelCell Energy, Inc.

Danbury-based FuelCell Energy recently won a $1.5 million research grant from the Department of Energy. It’s money coming at a time when industry leaders are hopeful fuel cell technology will grow in the state.

Bob Adelman / Free the Beaches: The Story of Ned Coll and the Battle for America’s Most Exclusive Shoreline

This Memorial Day weekend, Connecticut residents will flock to the shoreline, raising umbrellas and spreading towels along the state's beaches.

Yet, behind this sunny imagery hides a somber history -- a story of coastal ownership and exclusivity.

This hour, University of Virginia professor and Free the Beaches author Andrew Kahrl joins us. We reflect on the impact of Connecticut’s private and restricted beaches and learn about a 20th-century crusade to unlock the state’s coast. 

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Standing at a trailhead in Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge, I’m enveloped by a chorus of birdsong.

This is one of several spots in the preserve, which stretches along 70 miles of Connecticut coast. The whole space is home to forest, islands, and tidal marshes. If you're in the neighborhood, its Salt Meadow Unit can make for a perfect lunchtime getaway. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Which Republican candidates are heading to primaries or the general election? We talk with Christine Stuart, editor of CTNewsJunkie.com about the state GOP convention. And she tells us what state lawmakers did—and didn’t—accomplish during this legislative session.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This November, voters will see a ballot question asking them to change Connecticut’s constitution. The question will focus on how the state controls public land and whether the whole process should be more transparent.

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

In nature, fascinating biology can be found on the edges -- intermingled habitats where biodiversity can flourish. Connecticut Public Radio recently traveled to one such edge, what’s called a “head of tide.”

Lonnie Tague / United States Department of Justice

The sudden resignation of New York’s attorney general could complicate lawsuits where Connecticut cooperates with the Empire State.

Ed Dunens / Flickr

As President Trump talks about draining the swamp in Washington D.C., we turn our attention to actual swamps. Associated with death and decay, while also celebrated for their beauty and biodiversity, few landscapes evoke such contradictory sentiments as swamps.

A red-eared slider.
Wikimedia Commons

A bill protecting turtles in Connecticut has unanimously passed the House. The legislation seeks to carve out conservations for snapping turtles and red-eared sliders.

Patrick Comins / Connecticut Audubon Society

It finally feels like spring, and that means you may be seeing some visitors around your home because peak bird migration season is almost here! This hour, we ask the State Ornithologist what to be on the look for. And we talk with the Connecticut Audubon Society about ways you can get involved in bird conservation here in our state. UConn and DEEP have teamed up to create a new Connecticut Bird Atlas a project that relies on volunteer citizen scientists like you.

What birds have you seen in your backyard?

Margo Fontaine / Creative Commons

The Environmental Protection Agency has announced more than $8 million in “brownfield” remediation grants, money that will fund assessments and cleanups of old industrial sites throughout New England.

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

A state-wide census of trail use is underway. Last year, it recorded more than 1.4 million trips taken by hikers, bikers, and others looking to get outside.

NOAA

Commercial fishing groups are joining in federal court to challenge the creation of the Atlantic Ocean's first-ever marine national monument. But the federal government is now asking for the case to be tossed out.

At stake is the future of roughly 5,000 square miles off the coast of Massachusetts, called the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

You can think of an anaerobic digester as a big metal stomach. Biodegradables go in, get composted, and turned into energy. And now, the hope is that the waste turns into a profit.

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