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environment

Bert Kaufmann / Creative Commons

Tens of millions of dollars that were to be set aside to make homes and businesses more energy efficient will instead be pumped into the state’s general fund.

It’s a funding raid that’s been criticized as a “hidden tax” on utility bills.

Here’s what the changes mean for consumers -- and greenhouse gases.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission flickr.com/photos/nrcgov/6517600977/ / Creative Commons

A decision that could change the way Connecticut’s only nuclear plant sells its power is expected in the coming weeks. Now, dozens of legislators are using the state’s recent cold snap as evidence the Millstone Power Station needs to stay online.

Wayne National Forest / Creative Commons

The town of Simsbury is debating whether it will formally appeal a massive solar project. At issue is a decision reached by the Connecticut Siting Council last month.

Justin Brockie / Creative Commons

Across New England, freezing temps and blizzard conditions marked an unforgiving start to 2018.

This hour, we consider the factors underlying this extreme winter weather -- including the role of global climate change. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Long Island Sound has a new guardian of sorts. Earlier this year, biologist Bill Lucey was named soundkeeper of the Northeast estuary.

This hour, the Connecticut native stops by our studios.

We learn more about his role and talk about efforts to improve life in and around the Sound.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

One of Connecticut’s most uncommon species of evergreen can still be found -- if you know where to look.

Aequorea victoria
Sierra Blakely / Wikimedia Commons

Did you know 75 percent of animals in the ocean glow?

arne meyer / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s new budget will move tens of millions of dollars out of energy efficiency programs, sweeping that money, instead, into the state’s general fund. It’s a piece of legislative math aimed at shoring up a multi-billion dollar budget deficit. But the decision will directly impact ratepayers and put energy contractors around the state out of work.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

At twilight in late fall, thousands of crows take wing above highways running through Hartford. These crow “commuters” are headed home to roost, but where, exactly, do they go?

Oregon DOT / Creative Commons

Rebuilding America’s infrastructure is an idea lots of politicians embrace. But how to pay for it can be tricky. Now, one Connecticut congressman is suggesting a possible solution: taxing pollution.

Jon Kalish

Fishermen are worried about an offshore wind farm proposed 30 miles out in the Atlantic from Montauk, NY, the largest fishing port in the state. They say those wind turbines – and many others that have been proposed – will impact the livelihood of fishermen in New York and New England.   

John Morgan / Creative Commons

The House of Representatives passed a 440-page tax bill Thursday that was introduced two short weeks ago. Among other things, the bill would remove deductions  important to people with big medical expenses and college tuitions and ultimately hit hardest those making $75,000 or less. 

Karim D. Ghantous / Creative Commons

Following an October storm that cut power to more than 300,000 customers -- utilities in Connecticut say they want to better predict storm outages. That means tweaking computer models which, by nature, are imperfect.

Chrissie Jamleson / Flickr

There are an estimated 10 quintillion insects living on the planet right now-- That's 1.4 billion insects for each human. If they decided to take over, there's nothing we could do to stop them. Fortunately, they seem relatively content to share their planet with us.

C Watts / flickr creative commons

In 1959, Soviet geneticist Dmitri Belyaev started an ambitious experiment to study the origins of domestication -- he would attempt to breed domesticated wild foxes by selecting on their behavior alone, a process he imagined our ancestors carried out with dogs thousands of years before.

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