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energy

Millstone Power Station

As nuclear power plants across the country close, the owners of the Millstone Power Station in Waterford, Connecticut are asking the state legislature for help. They want to sell their electricity directly to utilities through a state-run auction. It's a controversial -- and complicated -- request. And now, some energy experts think the nuclear industry should embrace a simpler solution: taxing pollution.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

President Donald Trump's executive order to review and possibly roll back the Clean Power Plan is drawing response from attorneys general in several states -- including Connecticut.

Stop and Shop

Each year billions of pounds of food go to waste. That means billions of dollars, too. The Environmental Protection Agency says more food reaches landfills and incinerators than any other one material in our trash. And for supermarkets, that leftover food equates to lost dollars.

Millstone Power Station

A bill that could change the way Connecticut's only nuclear power plant sells its energy is taking shape at the state capitol. Officials at Millstone Power Station are asking legislators to let them sell electricity directly to utilities.

pj_vanf / Creative Commons

Changes to Connecticut's "bottle bill" continue to be discussed by lawmakers. The debate centers around whether a recycling system developed decades ago is still viable.

Members of American Indian tribes, indigenous communities and their supporters are demonstrating today in Washington, D.C., calling on the Trump administration to meet with tribal leaders and protesting the construction of the nearly complete Dakota Access Pipeline.

The protest is partly led by the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, which has been battling the federal government for more than a year over an oil pipeline that members say endangers their drinking water and has destroyed sacred sites in North Dakota.

Creative Commons / Community College of Vermont

Former Vermont Governor Pete Shumlin recently visited Wesleyan University to reflect on his career and discuss ways to combat climate change.

On Thursday morning, law enforcement entered the Oceti Sakowin camp to do a final sweep before officially shutting it down, ending a months-long protest against the completion of the nearby Dakota Access Pipeline.

The Oceti Sakowin camp was the largest of several temporary camps on the northern edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota. Protesters have been living on this land for months, in support of members of the Standing Rock Sioux.

Local law enforcement officers have arrested some people who chose not to evacuate federal land near part of the Dakota Access Pipeline north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. Most protesters had left earlier. At dusk, police moved back, and said they would not enter the camp at that time.

In North Dakota, authorities set Wednesday as the deadline for the dwindling number of protesters against the Dakota Access pipeline to clean up and go home.

At the main protest camp, a massive cleanup effort has been underway. Semi trucks have been hauling debris out of camp and people here are piling garbage into bags.

"It looks like a trash pile. But it's getting picked up and every spot is starting to look better and better as we work together," Dotty Agard of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe says as she sorts through abandoned goods.

Environmental advocates say a planned natural gas pipeline in New England could cost ratepayers more than twice what’s currently projected. And they point to a study that says the pipeline could be unnecessary by as early as 2023.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Twenty-first century technology has made its way onto a 19th-century building in Hamden. WNPR recently visited the headquarters of the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation, which just installed solar panels on its office.

dno1967b / Creative Commons

As natural gas gets diverted for home and other heating this winter, the head of New England's electricity grid is warning about possible future risks to the region's power.

Rocpoc / Creative Commons

When you buy a container of soda, water, or beer, you pay five cents -- and if you return the bottle or can to be recycled, you get that money back. In Connecticut, the program is called “the bottle bill,” and it’s been around since 1980. But now, some are worried the whole system is on the verge of falling apart.

FuelCell Energy, Inc.

A fuel cell came online Monday in Connecticut, at Amity Regional High School in Woodbridge.

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