WNPR

elections

When Donald Trump came down the escalator in June of 2015 in the tower he named for himself in Manhattan, few of us who do politics for a living took his off-the-cuff announcement for president seriously.

But the past 17 months have been a lesson to all of us who flattered ourselves — as campaign pros, polling pros and media pros — that we knew more about politics than he did.

What have we learned? That Trump was being taken very seriously, indeed, by the people who ultimately mattered: voters.

Donald Trump has been elected the 45th president of the United States, the capstone of a tumultuous and divisive campaign that won over white voters with the promise to "Make America Great Again."

Trump crossed the 270 electoral vote threshold at 2:31 a.m. ET with a victory in Wisconsin, according to Associated Press projections.

Connecticut officials are reporting a high election day turnout. 

Secretary of the State Denise Merrill says she expects turnout to top 75 percent, which would be higher than the 2012 election. 

Governor Dannel Malloy urged voters to come out when and his wife cast their ballots in Hartford today.

He says, "This has been a hard fought contest, got nasty at times, got strange and bizarre at times. There were ups and downs. But you know, listen, this has played itself out over a two year period of time. Let's get this thing done. Let's go out and vote."

Heather Brandon / WNPR

After months of non-stop coverage and politicking, voters got the final say on Tuesday to cap off the 2016 election. WNPR went to several cities and towns in Connecticut to talk with them on the final day of a long campaign season. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Voters started lining up before polls opened on Tuesday at 6:00 am in Connecticut. Residents are choosing their state lawmakers, congressional delegation, a United States senator -- and which presidential candidate will receive the state's seven electoral college votes.

Pages