elections

If you've enjoyed the battle for control of the Senate over the past many months, here's some good news: The drama could well spill over into next month — or even next year.

While Republicans are increasingly optimistic — and Democrats, pessimistic — about their prospects Tuesday, there are plausible scenarios that could have America waiting well beyond Nov. 4 to know which party will have a Senate majority.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Kiernan Majerus-Collins is a Democrat from West Hartford. He's gotten two mailers from state Democrats and one from an outside organization, and they want him to know that they're watching his voting habits. 

santiagostudio.com

Latino voters are overwhelmingly more likely to support Democratic candidates than Republicans, but that has been changing in recent years. The national GOP has talked a lot about being more “inclusive”, even as voter ID laws in places like Texas seem aimed squarely at reducing the number of Latinos able to vote.

Christopher Penn / Creative Commons

Voting in one Rhode Island town next Tuesday won't be quick. The Providence Journal reports that voters in Barrington will confront 40 ballot questions proposing changes in how government operates.

Chion Wolf

According to the latest Q-poll, a lot of Connecticut voters don’t like any of the candidates running in the upcoming gubernatorial election. But, they don’t have much choice in that race or any of the other state races that generally have 2 candidates -- maybe three if we’re lucky -- on the menu.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Next Tuesday, November 4, Connecticut is among several states that will ask voters about changing elections laws. The ballot question on amending the Connecticut constitution is the "first" step towards making voting more flexible here.

mgmspringfield.com

Massachusetts voters will get to decide a question on the ballot next week that’s of great interest to Connecticut. Opponents of the state’s law allowing casino gambling have placed a question that asks voters if they want to repeal the measure. 

Toronto Public Library

We’re just over a week away from the November 4 elections, and, so far, we’ve spent a lot of time talking politics here in our state. But what about our neighbors to the north, east, and west? 

Activists in Hong Kong, angered by what they perceive as little progress in talks on democratic reforms with the government, marched to the home of the territory's chief executive to demand his ouster.

On the first day for in-person early voting in Illinois, President Obama went to the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Community Center to cast his ballot.

"I'm so glad I can early vote here," he told the elections worker checking him in.

Election officials in Massachusetts report a surge in new voter registrations ahead of Wednesday’s deadline.

   The number of voters registered in the city of Springfield has increased by 15,000 since 2009, according to Election Commissioner Gladys Oyola who credits voter registration drives by various special interest groups.  But, she cautions that the increase in the number of registered voters is not necessarily a sign of higher interest in the November election.

In recent years, social scientists have tried to find out whether important decisions are shaped by subtle biases. They've studied recruiters as they decide whom to hire. They've studied teachers, deciding which students to help at school. And they've studied doctors, figuring out what treatments to give patients. Now, researchers have trained their attention on a new group of influential people — state legislators.

This story is part of the New Boom series on millennials in America.

The number of pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong has dwindled today after a weekend that saw dozens of arrests and an angry backlash from business owners whose shops were shut down amid the demonstrations.

The South China Morning Post says: "Protest sites are quiet on Monday as some demonstrators leave for work, others remain and authorities keep their distance."

Monkey Business / Thinkstock

Public opinion polling has a pretty extensive history here in the United States. Since the 19th century, interest groups, researchers, think tanks, media outlets have all used polls to measure the favorability of a wide range of political, social, and economic issues. 

Updated at 8:30 a.m. ET

Hong Kong leader Leung Chun-ying is appealing to pro-democracy demonstrators who've brought parts of the Asian financial hub to a standstill in recent days to halt their campaign "immediately" because, he says, Beijing won't accede to their demands. But protesters have promised to announce a new phase of civil disobedience if reforms aren't forthcoming.

British Prime Minister David Cameron says now that voters in Scotland have rejected independence, he is committed to giving more powers not only to Scotland, but also to "everyone in England, Wales and Northern Ireland."

Scots decide today whether to end 300 years of union with Great Britain and go it alone as they cast ballots in a historic referendum that is sure to have a lasting impact no matter the outcome.

Public opinion polls in recent days have suggested that Scotland is evenly split on the question and that the vote could be extremely close. The options are to vote "yes" or "no" to the question: "Should Scotland be an independent country?"

The results are expected on Friday.

It's lunchtime at Drummond Community High School in Edinburgh. The kids are all wearing the uniform of a smart black blazer, white shirt and blue tie. Some 16- and 17-year-olds are here with their cheese sandwiches and their baked potatoes.

They get to cast ballots Thursday in what looks to be a close vote on whether Scotland will become independent or remain part of the United Kingdom.

Here's what some of them are saying:

"Scotland will be a richer country if there's a 'yes' vote" for independence, says Calum Preston. "It's just a fact."

Chion Wolf / WNPR

On the eve of a vote that could trigger independence after 307 years, Scotland has become a hot topic in the media. What would happen if the vote swings "yes"? Or what would be the consequences if a "no" vote rules?

It's interesting to listen to Americans try to explain tomorrow's Scottish vote to each other. We don't even have a common, settled understanding of the nature of the existing union, and therefore we have a hard time judging what is being proposed.

Screenshot from "Frankenstein"

While the rest of the Northeast was having a September primary day that pointed to voter dissatisfaction with some incumbent Democrats, Connecticut was waiting for a little bit of news about its biggest political race to drop this morning. The new Quinnipiac poll on the Governor’s race is finally out today...and look, it shows voter dissatisfaction with an incumbent Democrat.

CT Senate Democrats

Pressure is growing on Senate Democrats to release more information about the future of Senator Andrew Maynard. Maynard was seriously injured in a fall two months ago, and questions remain about his ability to stand for election in November.

CT Mirror

Former Governor John Rowland is back on trial today as he faces charges of election-fraud. Former President Bill Clinton  was in his old stomping-grounds of New Haven to raise money for Governor Dan Malloy and former Congressman Rob Simmons is getting back into politics!

Todd Mundt / Creative Commons

Access Health CT CEO Kevin Counihan is leaving Connecticut to join John Dankosky in Washington, DC. Actually, Counihan will be the CEO of HealthCare.gov and Dankosky will be back tomorrow.

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko announced today on the presidential website that he was dissolving parliament and called for fresh elections on Oct. 26.

Poroshenko said the move was in accordance with the country's constitution, noting that Ukraine's coalition government collapsed July 24.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Since he launched his campaign for governor, Jonathan Pelto was criticized by Democrats for being a "spoiler" to Governor Dannel Malloy this November. Pelto admits, though, that it's "increasingly likely that we will fall short" of the 7,500 signatures needed to make the ballot.

Lovesofbread / Wikimedia Commons

With all eyes on Ferguson, Missouri, many people are also taking a step back to look at their own communities. What many of us see is a problem not restricted to Ferguson. Earlier this week, we had a conversation about urban policing and the militarization of police forces. 

Chion Wolf

We continue our Where We Vote series with third party candidate for governor, Joe Visconti. He’s confident that he collected enough signatures to make it onto the November ballot - and many of those signatures came from a key demographic for him: gun owners. We’ll be joined in-studio by Visconti to talk about his candidacy and where he stands on the issues.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Secretary of the State Denise Merrill said that just one in five registered Republicans voted in the party's recent primary that nominated Tom Foley for governor.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Maybe "Primary-Palooza" is an exaggeration, since voter turnout is abysmal, at best, in some towns. Our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse recaps the results of votes cast. 

Were you one of the few, the proud, the voters? Did you join the masses of non-voters? We'd love to hear your Primary Day stories on The Wheelhouse.

Pages