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elections

Ad Meskens / Creative Commons

The bad news is that the Trump Administration may be in for another rough week. 

With a razor-thin margin, leftist candidate Lenín Moreno appears to have won Ecuador's presidential election. But his conservative opponent, Guillermo Lasso, plans to object to Sunday's vote — he says the numbers don't add up, citing an exit poll that had showed him in the lead.

A panel of federal judges ruled on Friday that three of Texas' congressional districts are illegal, violating the Constitution and the Voting Rights Act. The panel found that Republicans had used race as a motivating factor in redistricting.

Judges Xavier Rodriguez and Orlando Garcia wrote the court's decision, which comes after a protracted and complex legal battle that began when the new districts were drawn in 2011, following the last census.

Fighting For The Vote

Mar 8, 2017
FBI/wikimedia

Fifty-two years ago this week, 600 peaceful protesters gathered in Selma, Alabama for what would become known as The Bloody Sunday March. Their goal was to draw attention to the importance of protecting the vote, not just for African Americans, but all Americans. 

David Maiolo / Creative Commons

This hour, we dissect President Trump's joint address to Congress -- what he's themed "the renewal of the American spirit."

Connecticut Holding Three Special Elections Today

Feb 28, 2017

Control of Connecticut's Senate may be at stake in Tuesday's special elections. There's currently an even number of Republicans and Democrats, with two open seats.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

With President Donald Trump is poised to sign a executive order calling for an investigation into allegations of massive voter fraud in the November election, Connecticut's Secretary of the State Denise Merrill reminded reporters Friday that voter fraud is rare, and there is no evidence that it happened in November on the scale suggested by the President. 

Stefan Baudy / Creative Commons

Recently we asked you what questions you have about how your town government works.

This hour, two listeners join us to ask their questions and we try to answer them.

On a cold night in January nine years ago, Barack Obama won the Iowa caucuses. That first big step on the young senator's unlikely path to the White House was fueled by an army of campaign volunteers, which Obama later called one of his proudest legacies.

"That's what America needs right now," Obama told campaign workers a year later, after he was sworn in as president. "Active citizens like you, who are willing to turn towards each other, talk to people you've never met, and say, 'C'mon, let's go do this. Let's go change the world.' "

Mark / Creative Commons

Hate crimes and incidents of intimidation and harassment have increased across our nation, including here in Connecticut.

This hour, we speak with Connecticut's U.S. Attorney Deirdre Daly about a letter she wrote to the community urging residents to speak up and report these incidents.

President-elect Donald Trump won a convincing electoral vote victory on Nov. 8, but he is claiming falsely that widespread voter fraud cost him the popular vote.

The latest totals show Hillary Clinton leading Trump in the popular vote by more than 2 million. Trump tweeted on Sunday afternoon, "I won the popular vote if you deduct the millions of people who voted illegally." He did not provide evidence to back up that claim, and Trump's representatives did not immediately respond to a request for more information.

Every four years, the Electoral College creeps back into the lives of American voters. In some presidential elections, the strange, indirect system used to select the next U.S. president can feel like a formality that doesn't seem to matter much.

In other elections, it matters very much indeed. This is one of those years.

TIM KAINE:

Thank you so much. Please, please have a seat. My wife Anne and I are so proud of Hillary Clinton. I'm proud of Hillary Clinton because she has been and is a great history maker in everything she has done - as a civil rights lawyer, and First Lady of Arkansas, and First Lady of this country, and senator, and Secretary of State. She has made history. In a nation that is good at so many things but that has made it uniquely difficult for a woman to be elected to federal office.

Hillary Clinton conceded the White House race to President-elect Donald Trump on Wednesday morning, saying she hoped "he will be a successful president for all Americans."

"This is not the outcome we wanted or worked so hard for. I'm sorry we didn't win this election for the values we share and the vision we hold for our country," the Democratic nominee told supporters crowded into a small, nondescript ballroom at the New Yorker Hotel in Midtown Manhattan.

When Donald Trump came down the escalator in June of 2015 in the tower he named for himself in Manhattan, few of us who do politics for a living took his off-the-cuff announcement for president seriously.

But the past 17 months have been a lesson to all of us who flattered ourselves — as campaign pros, polling pros and media pros — that we knew more about politics than he did.

What have we learned? That Trump was being taken very seriously, indeed, by the people who ultimately mattered: voters.

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