elections

Chuck Kennedy / White House

It's that time of the political season when just about every Tuesday seems like a "Super Tuesday." More voters head to the polls, and on our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, we discuss the results, and take a look at what's ahead for both major political parties.

Myanmar has elected its first civilian president after decades of military rule.

U Htin Kyaw, a close ally of Nobel laureate and democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi, won the legislature's vote. Suu Kyi was barred from running herself by the country's constitution — drafted by the former military leaders — because she has two foreign sons.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It's Monday. Remember last Monday when we had a somewhat long and somewhat anguished conversation about Donald Trump? Well, we're planning to have another one toward the end of today's show. 

Maegan Tintari / Creative Commons

I once slipped on a banana peel in my crowded high school cafeteria when I was sixteen years old. I was navigating the busy lunch room in my almost six-inch platform shoes and my breezy spring dress, when the peel sent me flying -  before ungraciously landing me on my back with my dress over my face. I was never so embarrassed - or uncomfortable in a pair of shoes.

While the Republican Party splits over which direction it should head, GOP officials say they've been quietly trying to turn the page with black voters in Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan, North Carolina and Florida.

The effort is the result of the GOP's so-called "autopsy" report on the 2012 elections, when Mitt Romney won 6 percent of the African-American vote, down from the 11 percent George W. Bush won in 2004. President Obama carried 93 percent of the black vote, helping him secure victory in key battleground states such as Ohio.

Elizabeth Hahn / Creative Commons

Steve Almond says he's rooting for Donald Trump to win the nomination, even though he doesn't want him to be our next president. He says the GOP has been riling up their base voters for so long, it's no surprise that Trump is now overtly channeling all the "racist and nativist rhetoric" that has been covertly promoted by the party for decades.  

Donald Trump won the Massachusetts Republican primary on Super Tuesday with nearly half the vote. Trump took 49 percent, far ahead of John Kasich, with 18 percent. Marco Rubio came in right behind Kasich, with nearly 18 percent of the vote. Ted Cruz finished fourth, with almost 10 percent, and Ben Carson won 3 percent of the vote.

In all, about 600,000 people voted in the Republican primary.

Spirits were high Tuesday night in the Whiskey Priest bar on the South Boston waterfront, where Hillary Clinton supporters gathered to watch election returns. Among them was Boston Mayor Marty Walsh, Clinton’s cheerleader in chief in Massachusetts.

“And I keep watching that TV cause I want that little yellow checkmark next to our name in Massachusetts, but I can tell you, when that happens it’s because of Boston. We won by 20,000 votes today!” Walsh said.

As the presidential race shifted to Nevada with Democratic caucuses last week and Republican caucuses Tuesday night, more young voters had a chance to chime in to the political process. Nevada is a state with a huge young, diverse population.

But there is the perennial question: Do young people matter in politics?

In every recent election, you've probably heard some iteration of the same generational critique: "Young people don't vote."

Vermont U.S. Senator and Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders spoke to an enthusiastic crowd at UMass Amherst last night, about a week before the Massachusetts primary.

Jamelle Boule / Creative Commons

Donald Trump's win in this weekend's South Carolina primary was bigger than most establishment Republicans, and the media, want to admit. It comes after a week that would have sunk the other candidates; he tangled with the Pope, said the Bush administration didn't protect us from 9/11, and almost supported Obamacare's health care mandate, before he took it back. Are his supporters irrational, or do they just not care about his gaffes? Can anyone really still stop him?

On the campaign trail, the chief anchor of the Spanish-language network Univision, Jorge Ramos, chases three quarries: voters, viewers and relevance.

A self-described dinosaur who insists on mastering new tricks, Ramos and his team now reach an audience of millions who are watching not on television, but via video streams on Facebook, captured by an iPhone clutched in a selfie stick.

President Obama backed a bill in Illinois last week that would automatically register people to vote when they apply for a driver's license or state ID.

"That will protect the fundamental right of everybody," he said. "Democrats, Republicans, independents, seniors, folks with disabilities, the men and women of our military — it would make sure that it was easier for them to vote and have their vote counted."

Feryal Salem

The 2016 presidential race has been loaded with rhetoric about a so-called “ISIS caliphate." But what exactly is a caliphate? And what does it mean to say that ISIS has one? This hour, local Islamic scholar Dr. Feryal Salem fills us in. 

Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders won clear, early and decisive victories in the New Hampshire primary Tuesday night.

Trump beat the GOP field by double digits. He got 35 percent of the vote, well ahead of surprise second-place finisher John Kasich, who pulled in 16 percent. Kasich was followed by Ted Cruz at 12 percent, Jeb Bush at 11 percent and Marco Rubio, who, after a poor debate performance Saturday, faded to fifth just shy of 11 percent.

New Hampshire Public Radio

Connecticut voters made the trip north to support their candidates in New Hampshire's presidential primary on Tuesday.

Chion Wolf / Wnpr

Secretary of the State Denise Merrill wants people who are doing business with the Connecticut Department of Motor Vehicles to be automatically registered to vote.

The Democrat announced Monday in Hartford that she submitted a proposal that would allow eligible DMV customers to be automatically registered unless they choose to opt out.

Mike Licht / Creative Commons

Our deepest convictions shape how we see the world from a very young age. Our parents, community, and religion deeply influence our beliefs and ultimately, the political identity we choose to adopt.

The major presidential candidates are campaigning across New Hampshire on Wednesday, continuing their sprint toward primary day next Tuesday.

Following her razor-thin victory in the Iowa caucuses, Democrat Hillary Clinton spent Tuesday rallying loyal Democrats. Her challenger, Bernie Sanders, was also back on the campaign trail — sounding a lot like an Iowa winner, as well.

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul is suspending his campaign for president after a disappointing finish in Iowa, turning his focus now to his Senate re-election bid.

"Across the country thousands upon thousands of young people flocked to our message of limited government, privacy, criminal justice reform and a reasonable foreign policy. Brushfires of Liberty were ignited, and those will carry on, as will I," the Republican said in a statement.

In a photo finish early Tuesday, the Iowa Democratic Party declared Hillary Clinton the winner in Monday's Iowa Caucus. She edged out Sen. Bernie Sanders by a mere fraction of a percent, 49.9 percent to 49.6 percent, in what NPR calls "the thinnest of margins in the closest Democratic contest ever." And Sanders’ supporters say a tie is as good as a win for the Vermont senator. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The eyes of the nation turn to Iowa. But, why? The caucus process doesn't really resemble voting as we do it the rest of the time in this nation. And, the Iowa caucuses aren't really binding in terms of national delegate selection.  Iowa doesn't look like the rest of the nation, by which I mean, way whiter, but this in the words of Bruce Hornsby, is "just the way it is."

We also talk about the New York Times endorsement of Hillary Clinton and reactions to her candidacy. 

As any bridge player can tell you, the game is different when there is no trump.

On Thursday night in Des Moines, Iowa, the seventh debate among major candidates for president in the Republican Party set a new standard in both substance and tone. And it did so because the front-runner in the 2016 nomination fight, Donald J. Trump, did not attend.

Since launching his candidacy for president last May, Sen. Bernie Sanders has watched his poll numbers explode. But Hillary Clinton continues to hold a major advantage with the black and Latino voters that will be key to winning the Democratic nomination. Sanders says he’s convinced he can close that gap.

This week, NPR asked voters around the country how they are feeling about this election, and why so many tell us they are anxious or angry.

President Obama and Vice President Biden "have tried to be fair and even-handed" in the primary process, Sen. Bernie Sanders said Wednesday following a meeting with the president at the White House.

Calling the meeting "constructive and productive," Sanders cautiously praised the Obama administration's economic work, saying there is still work to be done. The two also talked talked about foreign and domestic policy and "a little bit of politics," according to Sanders, who spoke to reporters after the meeting.

Earlier this month, no less an authority than TeenVogue declared that Bernie Sanders is “killin' it” with millennials.

This week, NPR and some member stations will be taking the temperature of the electorate in communities around the country. You can follow those stations, via Twitter, here.

The mood of the voters is one of the most important political factors in an election year. This year voters are anxious, frightened and angry.

Candidates in both parties are trying to show they get it.

There was a new urgency as Republican presidential hopefuls took the stage Thursday evening, with simmering feuds spilling into the open less than three weeks before the Iowa caucuses.

The onetime detente between Donald Trump and Ted Cruz was gone. The billionaire real estate mogul early on had to defend his doubts as to whether the Canadian-born Texas senator is even eligible for the White House.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Former gubernatorial candidate Joe Visconti said he's now exploring a run for the U.S. Senate.

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