elections

The major presidential candidates are campaigning across New Hampshire on Wednesday, continuing their sprint toward primary day next Tuesday.

Following her razor-thin victory in the Iowa caucuses, Democrat Hillary Clinton spent Tuesday rallying loyal Democrats. Her challenger, Bernie Sanders, was also back on the campaign trail — sounding a lot like an Iowa winner, as well.

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul is suspending his campaign for president after a disappointing finish in Iowa, turning his focus now to his Senate re-election bid.

"Across the country thousands upon thousands of young people flocked to our message of limited government, privacy, criminal justice reform and a reasonable foreign policy. Brushfires of Liberty were ignited, and those will carry on, as will I," the Republican said in a statement.

In a photo finish early Tuesday, the Iowa Democratic Party declared Hillary Clinton the winner in Monday's Iowa Caucus. She edged out Sen. Bernie Sanders by a mere fraction of a percent, 49.9 percent to 49.6 percent, in what NPR calls "the thinnest of margins in the closest Democratic contest ever." And Sanders’ supporters say a tie is as good as a win for the Vermont senator. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The eyes of the nation turn to Iowa. But, why? The caucus process doesn't really resemble voting as we do it the rest of the time in this nation. And, the Iowa caucuses aren't really binding in terms of national delegate selection.  Iowa doesn't look like the rest of the nation, by which I mean, way whiter, but this in the words of Bruce Hornsby, is "just the way it is."

We also talk about the New York Times endorsement of Hillary Clinton and reactions to her candidacy. 

As any bridge player can tell you, the game is different when there is no trump.

On Thursday night in Des Moines, Iowa, the seventh debate among major candidates for president in the Republican Party set a new standard in both substance and tone. And it did so because the front-runner in the 2016 nomination fight, Donald J. Trump, did not attend.

Since launching his candidacy for president last May, Sen. Bernie Sanders has watched his poll numbers explode. But Hillary Clinton continues to hold a major advantage with the black and Latino voters that will be key to winning the Democratic nomination. Sanders says he’s convinced he can close that gap.

This week, NPR asked voters around the country how they are feeling about this election, and why so many tell us they are anxious or angry.

President Obama and Vice President Biden "have tried to be fair and even-handed" in the primary process, Sen. Bernie Sanders said Wednesday following a meeting with the president at the White House.

Calling the meeting "constructive and productive," Sanders cautiously praised the Obama administration's economic work, saying there is still work to be done. The two also talked talked about foreign and domestic policy and "a little bit of politics," according to Sanders, who spoke to reporters after the meeting.

Earlier this month, no less an authority than TeenVogue declared that Bernie Sanders is “killin' it” with millennials.

This week, NPR and some member stations will be taking the temperature of the electorate in communities around the country. You can follow those stations, via Twitter, here.

The mood of the voters is one of the most important political factors in an election year. This year voters are anxious, frightened and angry.

Candidates in both parties are trying to show they get it.

There was a new urgency as Republican presidential hopefuls took the stage Thursday evening, with simmering feuds spilling into the open less than three weeks before the Iowa caucuses.

The onetime detente between Donald Trump and Ted Cruz was gone. The billionaire real estate mogul early on had to defend his doubts as to whether the Canadian-born Texas senator is even eligible for the White House.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Former gubernatorial candidate Joe Visconti said he's now exploring a run for the U.S. Senate.

Ben W / Creative Commons

The Libertarian Party is suing the state of Connecticut in federal court, challenging laws regarding the rules for petitioning candidates to appear on the election ballot. 

Many Republicans may have sided with Donald Trump's controversial proposal to ban Muslims from entering the U.S., but his rival Jeb Bush predicts that the GOP faithful will eventually oppose the plan and see it his way.

"Trump clearly banning all Muslims would actually be so counterproductive in our efforts to destroy ISIS that it's foolhardy," the former Florida governor told NPR's Steve Inskeep in an interview Wednesday in Boston. "I mean, it's beyond ridiculous; it's quite dangerous."

Dealing a big blow to President Nicolas Maduro's Socialist leadership, Venezuelan voters handed a majority of congressional seats to a coalition of opposition parties.

NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports the opposition gains control of congress for the first time since Hugo Chávez ushered in victory for the leftist movement in 1999. She filed this report for our Newcast unit:

Edit note: Since this story was first published, former Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver was found guilty of taking nearly $4 million in bribes and kickbacks. We have updated the story to reflect this change.

Las Vegas has The Mob Museum. Washington, D.C., has the International Spy Museum. And if a concerned citizen has his way, there will be a Museum of Political Corruption in Albany, N.Y.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Hartford Mayor-elect Luke Bronin is gearing up to take office in the early morning hours of January 1. He announced his transition team on Wednesday morning.

In 2008, one voting bloc in particular made a huge difference in the presidential election: young people. Young voters were a crucial part of the coalition that propelled President Obama to victory then.

But what about now? What issues matter to young voters this time around — and which candidates are doing the best job so far of speaking to those concerns?

Mark M. Murray / The Springfield Republican

Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno has relieved Sal Circosta of his seat on the city’s Community Police Hearing Board, which reviews complaints against police officers. Circosta was the mayor’s challenger in this last election.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Following a recount, officials in Clinton have determined the outcome of the coastal Connecticut town's first selectman vote by the slimmest of possible margins.

Connecticut Local Election Turnout Was 33 Percent

Nov 7, 2015

Turnout for municipal elections in Connecticut continues to be low, with 32.7 percent of registered voters going to the polls earlier this week.

bldsteelpointe.com

Bridgeport’s business community is absorbing the news that Joe Ganim will soon be back in the mayor’s office. It's a city that’s always needed all hands on deck to stimulate economic development, attract businesses, and boost employment.

Heather Katsoulis / Creative Commons

It was Sharon Uricchio's first municipal election as Clinton's town clerk. She never thought there'd be a tie.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Municipal election day has come and gone in Connecticut. This hour, our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse checks in on three of the state's big races: Hartford, Bridgeport, and New London. We chat with reporters, hear from Secretary of the State Denise Merrill, and take your comments and observations. Did you vote? If so, what was your experience like at the polls? 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

That Luke Bronin would win the mayoral election wasn’t exactly a surprise. In Hartford, the people who win the Democratic primary often win the November general election. And this night was no different. So the mood at Real Art Ways in Hartford was already celebratory long before Bronin got there.

Amy Hambly / WNPR

Just a short time after the polls closed, incumbent First Selectman of Stonington, George Crouse, conceded to his Republican challenger, Rob Simmons. Simmons claimed the First Selectman position handily, polling 2,893 to Crouse's 2,093. 

East Haven GOP incumbent mayor Joseph Maturo has claimed victory. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Three years ago, Connecticut voters elected the first two Latino senators in the state's history to the General Assembly. 

There are currently 13 Latinos serving in the General Assembly, according to the Latino and Puerto Rican Affairs Commission. While this is the most on record, it is still an underrepresentation of the population.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

A former Rhodes scholar who worked in the administrations of both President Barack Obama and Governor Dannel Malloy will be the next mayor of Hartford. 

Harriet Jones / WNPR

It's not a conventional political career path, but then the man who's forging it is hardly known for following conventions.

Rob Simmons, former Second District Representative in the U.S. House, is standing for First Selectman in his home town of Stonington (population 18,000 or so).

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