elections

Illustration by Mary Lou Cooke for WNPR / Photos by Robert H. Goun and Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

Donald Trump has swept the five Republican presidential primaries on Tuesday, including a win in Connecticut.

Hillary Clinton won the Democratic primary in Connecticut. She also won in Maryland, Delaware, and Pennsylvania. Bernie Sanders won in Rhode Island.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton took definitive steps toward solidifying their respective party's presidential nomination on Tuesday, making their rivals' task to beat them nearly insurmountable.

Trump won all five of the delegate-rich GOP primaries in Connecticut, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware and Rhode Island. Clinton notched four victories in Maryland, Delaware, Connecticut and Pennsylvania, while Bernie Sanders won the Rhode Island Democratic primary.

Connecticut Secretary of the State Denise Merrill’s office says members of the public have been asking about the “uncommitted” line on Tuesday's presidential primary ballot.

Merrill says the ballot line allows eligible voters to ask Connecticut delegates to decide for them at the Democratic and Republican Party conventions.

“It’s interesting because that ‘Uncommitted’ line has always been there, but it has never attracted any interest from anyone except this year. 

Theresa Thompson / Creative Commons

It's Primary Day in Connecticut and I'm excited about it.

For the first time in a long time, Connecticut voters feel they have a say in which candidate moves on to the general election in November, most of whom spent time speaking to voters in Connecticut this weekend.

WNPR

As presidential candidates crisscross the United States, they have to learn how to win in open primaries, closed primaries, and caucuses. If they want their party's nomination, they need support from average voters and the more high-profile superdelegates. Candidates also must navigate the unique and varying rules of each state's contest. We haven't even gotten to the general election and the electoral college rules!

As Primary Ballots Are Cast, Connecticut Voters Weigh in

Apr 26, 2016
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut Democrats and Republicans are voting on Tuesday in the state’s primaries. 

Citizens4taxjustice / Creative Commons

The effect of a declining middle class is everywhere -- the medically uninsured or underinsured, the heroin epidemic, declining life expectancy for middle-aged white men, flat wages, weakened unions -- the list goes on and on.

Alan Parkinson / Creative Commons

When history teacher Brandon Lorentz first told his students at Thirman Milner School they would be voting in a mock version of the presidential election, he wasn’t sure how they’d respond.

Illustration by Mary Lou Cooke for WNPR / Photos by Robert H. Goun and Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

Connecticut Democrats and Republicans vote for their party's nominee next week and a new Quinnipiac University poll shows Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump with statewide leads.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton notched important wins in their respective presidential primaries in their home state of New York on Tuesday night, helping both in their efforts to clinch their party's White House nomination.

In the Republican race, the billionaire real estate mogul sealed a massive victory over his two remaining rivals, sweeping at least 89 of the 95 delegates up for grabs.

The Associated Press reports:

Donald Trump is now the only Republican candidate with any chance of clinching the nomination before the convention.

Following widespread irregularities at polls in Brooklyn Tuesday, New York City officials are calling for major reforms at the Board of Elections.

The problem was first identified in a an analysis of state voter enrollment statistics by WNYC's Brigid Bergin. The Board of Elections then confirmed that more than 120,000 voters have been dropped from the rolls in Brooklyn alone since November.

Tucker Ives / WNPR

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump tailored his stump speech for the economic problems facing the state of Connecticut. He spoke to roughly 6,000 to 7,000 people at the Hartford Convention Center Friday night. Those who made it inside were met by thousands of protesters when they left.

 


Despite protests, presidential candidate Donald Trump spoke at a fundraiser for the Suffolk County Republican party in Patchogue.

Syria's bloody civil war has been raging for six years. At least a quarter of a million people have been killed, and half the country is displaced. Major swaths of the county are held by ISIS or opposition fighters.

But in government-held areas, citizens queued up to cast ballots Wednesday for parliamentary elections, the second since the start of the war. Syrian state media carried photos from multiple provinces showing voters tucking their ballots into boxes and dipping their fingers into ink to show their participation.

Oregon Sen. Jeff Merkley has endorsed Bernie Sanders for president, the first of Sanders' fellow members of the U.S. Senate to do so.

In a New York Times op-ed, Merkley wrote that Sanders is "boldly and fiercely addressing the biggest challenges facing our country." Merkley praised the Vermont senator for opposition to international trade deals, his push for renewable energy, his calls to crack down on big banks, and his fight to address campaign finance laws.

Gage Skidmore/Frank Plitt / Creative Commons

A new Quinnipiac University poll was released on Tuesday for the upcoming presidential primaries in New York State scheduled for April 19.


 Donald Trump's rally in Albany, New York, was interrupted several times by protesters.

Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

Republican presidential nominee John Kasich made his first official campaign stop in Connecticut on Friday at the Martire Center at Sacred Heart University in Fairfield.

State lawmakers and local supporters showed up Thursday for the opening of the Hillary Clinton campaign headquarters in Providence. Many of the state’s Democratic leadership, including Governor Gina Raimondo are backing the former Secretary of State.

Warwick resident Justine Lutzel-Caldwell voted for Clinton in 2008 and favors her positions on women’s health.

Astro / Creative Commons

A few weeks ago we held a conversation about the n-word -- how the word is used by black and white Americans; how it's been used by newspapers over time; and how one professor would like to see it stop being used altogether. 

Dave Granlund / DaveGranlund.com

The polling industry is in transition. Fewer people consider it their civic duty to participate -- less than ten percent today compared to 80 percent two decades ago -- and pollsters haven't yet figured out how to effectively capture public opinion using cell phones and online surveys. 

Drumming up support ahead of New York’s April 19 primary, former New York U.S. Senator Hillary Clinton campaigned in Westchester County Thursday. Though she was flanked by a number of staunch supporters, some students in the audience made it known they back her Democratic rival.

Bernie Sanders is telling thousands of supporters in New York City that if he wins the state's primary, he will win the White House. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Consumer advocate Ralph Nader spent the better part of two decades dreaming up a museum with a highly specific, slightly bizarre theme: tort law. In late 2015, that dream became a reality with the opening of the American Museum of Tort Law in downtown Winsted, Connecticut. 

North Country Public Radio

Reporters describe Donald Trump events as frightening and unsettling for those in the media. Trump relegates the media  to rectangular pens they're not allowed to leave, singles out reporters with personal insults and refuses entry to those he doesn't like, and whips up his crowds against reporters he says are "very dishonest people." Will there be a free press under a President Trump?

Jamelle Boule / Creative Commons

There is no doubt that Donald Trump has taken the country by storm, defying all expectations that his candidacy would implode after the initial infatuation wore off last summer. Why Trump now?

When it comes to turnout, the tables have...uh, turned.

In 2008, Democrats had the historic turnout numbers. GOP voters, meanwhile, came out in modest numbers in 2008 and 2012. But this year, Democrats are seeing their turnout figures fall off since 2008. Republicans, meanwhile, are coming out in droves.

Kevin Dooley / Creative Commons

Donald Trump is closer to locking up the Republican nomination for president after big wins in Tuesday's primaries. He has incredible support from a party that's grown increasingly disappointed in their established leaders, yet still seeks the traits we have traditionally sought in a leader. 

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