All summer long, the clock has been ticking on voting rights cases. Judges don't like to change voting rules too near an election, and November is creeping ever closer.

And the last two weeks, in particular, have been eventful: Five courts in five states ruled against voter ID and proof-of-citizenship laws.

There's still time for appeals and stays. But for now, advocates for voting access are celebrating.

"It's been like Christmas Day," one activist told CNN on Monday.

Many delegates from Vermont arrived at the Democratic National Convention this week ready to continue the political battle for Bernie Sanders. They’re now coming to terms with the fact that the convention in Philadelphia has marked the end of his presidential campaign.

When all was said and done, Team Hillary had to be pretty happy. Their four nights in Philadelphia turned out better than almost anyone expected.

Thursday night featured an orchestrated symphony of praise for Hillary Clinton and a precision-bombing of her opponent, Donald Trump.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It's the final day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia -  and the ride has been almost as wild as last week's Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

Ralph Nader is not happy with either the Republican or Democratic candidates for president. He says Republicans tolerating Donald Trump will look back and be ashamed and that Democrats chose a "deeply-rooted corporatist" and "militarist." In fact, he thinks the "two party tyranny" reduces the "voices and choices" of the people and we should all consider a third-party.  

Ida May Astute / ABC <a href=https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/>(Creative Commons)</a>

Scattered across the GOP convention hall floor in Cleveland, Ohio, delegates from around New England have been cheering in support of Donald Trump, a candidate who has run largely on an anti-establishment platform.

Erik Drost / Creative Commons

The Republican National Convention in Cleveland wraps up today following a speech by Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.

Mallory Benedict / PBS NewsHour

It’s the biggest party for Republicans since…well, 2012. GOP lawmakers, retired military leaders, and soap opera stars speak this week in Cleveland as the national Republican party puts a ring on Donald Trump. Our panel will provide mid-convention analysis and updates on the speeches, controversies, and theatrics that are on full-display in Ohio.

Mike Licht / Creative Commons

The Republican National Convention kicks off in Cleveland today after several days of pre-convention fireworks, including efforts by anti-Trump delegates to change the rules, Trump's agonizing indecision on his VP, and a changing list of speakers that will include more Trump family members than seasoned politicians. 

Donald Trump is running for president as a Washington outsider. Yet to manage his campaign, he's picked someone who is very much a Washington insider. Paul Manafort has been a political operative and lobbyist for years, including for some controversial figures seeking to influence U.S. politics.

Donald Trump could stand to benefit from his reported vice presidential pick Mike Pence in a number of ways, in particular from his strong Christian identity, which might help Trump gain needed support in evangelical communities.

But Pence initially endorsed Ted Cruz, albeit without enthusiasm, and there were some reports that the Indiana governor disliked Trump. Less than a week after Cruz dropped out, Pence endorsed Trump.

Erik (HASH) Hersman / Creative Commons

The Republican and Democratic National Conventions are just around the corner. The presumptive nominees? Two of the most unpopular presidential candidates in recent history: Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. 

Colleen P / Creative Commons

The Grand Old Party puts on its full Cleveland next week to make it official with Donald Trump. Bernie did the math, and endorsed Hillary Clinton. And one of our favorite Connecticut politicians has resurfaced as Clinton fundraiser.

Sen. Bernie Sanders endorsed former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton for the Democratic nomination for president Tuesday.

KAZ Vorpal / Creative Commons

Donald Trump wants to advance his business interests in Russia - and Vladimir Putin couldn't be happier. Putin's geopolitical interests rely on weakening the West. To that end, he has supported right-wing populists in Europe for more than a decade.  

Donald Trump may be the perfect tool to help Putin destroy the West. He supports many of the goals of Putin and has openly admired him. He's cultivated ties to Russia for a long time, including with a Russian gangster once jailed for slashing a man's face with a broken margarita glass. To make it worse, Trump has surrounded himself with advisors with shady ties to Russia.

el cajon / creative commons

Many Americans feel their vote no longer carries much clout in determining the decisions that most affect their lives -- whether it's about immigration, health care, gay rights, or gun control. The list goes on. The elected representatives they send to Congress as their voice are unable or unwilling to speak.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

FBI Director James Comey recommended no criminal charges against Hillary Clinton for her use of a personal email server while she was Secretary of State. His judgment came on the heels of the FBI's more than three hour interview with Hillary Clinton on Saturday

YouTube / Senate Democrats

It's been a busy week in Connecticut's political world. Sen. Chris Murphy rode the wave following his nearly 15-hour-long filibuster to get a vote on gun laws. That wave crashed this week after his colleagues rejected new restrictions on gun sales. But several gun-related issues made news from the judicial branch. This hour, our weekly news roundtable discusses these developments and an update from the state capitol where the legislature overrode some of Gov. Dannel Malloy's vetoes, but not as many as expected. 

Donkey Hotey / Creative Commons

Donald Trump has had a really bad few weeks. His poll numbers are dropping to the lowest point for any general election candidate in the last three years. He's coming under fire for his response to last week's shootings in Orlando, and for saying U.S. District Court Judge Gonzalo Curiel -- who is the judge overseeing the fraud case against Trump University -- may be biased against him because of his Mexican heritage.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Consumer advocate and Connecticut resident Ralph Nader says Hillary Clinton will be the next U.S. president, only because the nomination process favors people that Nader calls "establishment candidates."

Hillary Clinton has secured enough delegates to be the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, according to an updated count by The Associated Press. She is the first woman ever to head a major-party ticket in this country.

Steve Terrell / Wikimedia Commons

There has never been a time in the last ten presidential cycles when voters have disliked two presidential front-runners as much as they dislike Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. Yes, the country is becoming increasingly polarized, but that doesn't explain why the candidates aren't well-liked by their respective parties.

Donald Trump now has the support of 1,238 delegates — just a hair above the 1,237 threshold needed to clinch the Republican presidential nomination, according to The Associated Press.

Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton appear to have split victories in the Oregon and Kentucky primaries Tuesday night.

With all counties reporting in Kentucky, Clinton was leading Sanders by a narrow margin of 1,924 votes out of more than 450,000 cast. Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes told CNN that Clinton was the "unofficial winner," but the Associated Press said the race was too close to call.