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education

Catherine Boyce

This hour, Save the Children U.S. President and CEO Carolyn Miles joins us. We talk about her decades-long career and learn about the unconventional journey that led her to the Fairfield-based NGO.

It’s the latest conversation in Connecticut Public Radio's “Making Her Story” series, featuring prominent women with ties to the state. 

ccarlstead / Creative Commons

West Virginia, Oklahoma, Arizona. Across the country, teachers have been striking for better wages. This hour, we talk about the challenges facing public school teachers nationwide and here in Connecticut. Have we invested enough in the professionals who educate the next generation?

Bulkeley High School senior Yeicy Alejandro, smiling at left, talks to her new mentors from Central Connecticut State University. They're in the new "Ambassadors" program - Puerto Rican evacuees helping other students displaced by Hurricane Maria.
Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

Communications major Marivelisse Acosta attends Central Connecticut State University. But on Wednesday night, she stood in the cafeteria of Hartford’s Bulkeley High School, contemplating what to say as a mentor to the school’s displaced students from Puerto Rico.

CAS-CIAC

Connecticut’s Dr. Karissa Niehoff has been named the executive director of America’s ruling body of high school sports and activities, the National Federation of State High School Association. She’ll be the first-ever woman to lead the organization.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Details on how states could apply for federal disaster relief money for U.S. schools were due out over a week ago.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Central Connecticut State University has placed Joshua Perlstein, a professor in its theatre department, on administrative leave.

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

The November midterms are fast-approaching -- raising concerns about election security and the safeguarding of local voter identity.

This hour, we look at how Connecticut is responding with Secretary of the State Denise Merrill.

Plus: a Middletown-based prison program gives incarcerated adults the opportunity to work towards an Associate degree behind bars.

We learn about the Wesleyan Center for Prison Education and its recent degree-granting collaboration with Middlesex Community College.

And finally: Have recent weather reports left you feeling underwhelmed? Don’t be upset with your local forecaster, says Quinnipiac University professor Ben Bogardus.

Coming up, Bogardus joins us along with NBC Connecticut Chief Meteorologist Ryan Hanrahan. And we want to hear from you. 

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

In the wake of last month’s high school shooting in Parkland, Florida, many parents are wondering what to do — or who to look to — if a potential threat is uncovered at their child’s school. Parents in Avon were recently confronted by the reality of a school lockdown.

Bossi / Creative Commons

In the past decade, the amount of money that students owe for education has more than doubled to almost $1.4 trillion, and tuition for college has increased nearly 400 percent in the last 30 years. 

Before a screening of "Black Panther," artist Martha Walker-Dawkins paints the face of Zaniah Welsh, a fourth-grader at West Hartford's Smith STEM School. Engineer David Johnson sponsored the event to inspire students.
Vanessa de la Torre / WNPR

As a child in the Midwest, David Johnson said he dreamed of becoming an engineer.

CT-N

The legislature's Higher Education Committee heard hours of testimony Tuesday, in support of allowing undocumented students to access financial aid at state colleges. 

Andy Fleischmann - State Representative for West Hartford and Co-Chair of the CT General Assembly Education Committee.
Chion Wolf / WNPR

The state Supreme Court ruled last month that the way Connecticut funds public schools doesn’t violate the state’s constitution.

Spectactors at Tuesday's Hartford school board meeting in the Naylor School auditorium.
Vanessa de la Torre / WNPR

The Hartford school board voted Tuesday night to close two neighborhood schools this year, endorsing the first wave of a plan to downsize a school system with high needs and declining enrollment.

ccarlstead / Creative Commons

Supporters of a landmark court case on educational equality in Connecticut say they’ll now take their fight to the legislature, after a Supreme Court ruling went against them. 

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