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Still Revolutionary”… or stuck in a rut?

This hour -- in the midst of budget woes and major business losses -- we find out what Connecticut can and should be doing to bolster its image on the national stage. 

Reyner Media / Creative Commons

We spend over three trillion dollars on health care every year and we have worse outcomes than any other developed country - all of which spend on average about half of what America spends per person. 

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Alexion Pharmaceuticals plans to move its headquarters out of the city of New Haven where it began as a startup. The giant company will relocate its corporate office to Boston, the third major company to announce a move from the state in the last two years, following General Electric and Aetna.

Waiting for the Word / Creative Commons

John Nichols, author of Horsemen of the Trumpocalypse: A Field Guide to The Most Dangerous People in America believes Donald Trump has put together the most dangerous cabinet in history. He says Trump has filled it with partisan ideologues or people with no government experience and/or unqualified to do the job of their department. 

UTC

United Technologies’s aerospace units are about to get a lot bigger. The Farmington-based conglomerate has announced it will buy Rockwell Collins in a $30 billion dollar deal -- its biggest ever. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Health insurer Aetna has admitted it inadvertently revealed the HIV status of some of its customers in a paper mailing last month. 

Photo Courtesy Martin Podskoch / Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

In the midst of the Great Depression more than 80 years ago, President Franklin D. Roosevelt created the Civilian Conservation Corps — giving jobs to young men to support their families, while conserving the country’s wild lands and upgrading our state parks.

This hour, we revisit our show on the CCC’s impact in Connecticut and we hear from one “CCC boy” who is now 102 years old.

Medium

Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy has taken to the roadways of Connecticut for his second "Walk Across Connecticut," a chance to hear face to face from constituents about their concerns. Along the way he is holding daily town hall forums and eating at local restaurants.

Jon Callas / Creative Commons

Hartford has long been known as the insurance capital of the world, but will that change now that insurance giant, Aetna, is moving its headquarters out of the state?

This hour, we examine the past and future of insurance in Connecticut — and beyond.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The U.S Senate recently rejected a number of Republican plans to repeal, replace, or just overhaul the Affordable Care Act. But the health care debate is far from settled.

Americans have been waiting for a solid pay raise for years. Maybe there's good news awaiting them as the country employs more people.

The U.S. economic recovery has gone on for eight long years, and the unemployment rate is at a low 4.4 percent. But wage gains have barely budged.

That's got economists scratching their heads.

Daniel X. O'Neil / Creative Commons

Justice for all? Or justice for the privileged?

This hour, we hear how one Connecticut-based incubator is helping vulnerable residents gain access to counsel. We also examine more wide-ranging efforts to narrow the country’s “justice gap.” 

The Affordable Care Act is not "exploding" or "imploding," as President Trump likes to claim. But Trump does hold several keys to sabotaging the insurance marketplaces, should he so choose — one of which his administration is reportedly weighing using.

Photo Courtesy Martin Podskoch / Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

In the midst of the Great Depression more than 80 years ago, President Franklin D. Roosevelt created the Civilian Conservation Corps — giving jobs to young men to support their families, while conserving the country’s wild lands and upgrading our state parks.

This hour, we learn about the CCC’s impact in Connecticut and we hear from one “CCC boy” who is now 102 years old.

The heat of summer is felt by prospective homeowners in the housing market.

The average price of a single family home in the state has reached $410,000 — up $30,000 from the same time last year.

For many would-be homebuyers, it’s probably a little too hot.

“It’s a little scary the way things fly off the market,” says 34-year-old Katie McGee, a first grade teacher who lives in a small Somerville condo with her 2-year-old daughter and her fiancé, Charlie Linehan, a landscaper in Cambridge.

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